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Eastern Screech Owl,©David Sibley

7 Mar NEOLIT: Journal of Field Ornithology - Issue 1 - March 2015 [Rafael Guerta ]
6 Mar Re: searching a paper [Lucas Marti ]
6 Mar searching a paper [Mauro Guimarães Diniz ]
5 Mar Find PDF Copy [Janice Boyd ]
4 Mar Smithsonian Course: Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds [Luke Powell ]
4 Mar Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [NEOORN-L] help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus lawrencii) [Jeremy Minns ]
4 Mar Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [NEOORN-L] help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus lawrencii) ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
4 Mar Re: help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus lawrencii) ["Sherry, Thomas W" ]
4 Mar help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus lawrencii) ["Alexandra M. Class" ]
1 Mar Research opportunities for Latin American studuents [Jeff Stratford ]
26 Feb Birds on Ethiopian coffee farms [Evan Buechley ]
26 Feb North Star Science & Technology Satellite Transmitter Grant Program (Deadline 13 Mar 2015) [George Wallace ]
22 Feb Monk parakeet sampling [Grace Smith Vidaurre ]
19 Feb Fwd: Brazilian Journal of Ornithology - Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia [Marcos Persio ]
19 Feb Re: pdf request: Chebez et al. (2008) [Carlos Daniel Cadena Ordoñez ]
19 Feb Re: pdf request: Chebez et al. (2008) [SENT] [Nacho Areta ]
19 Feb NEOLIT: Historia Natural (tercera serie), 4 (1) [Santiago Claramunt ]
19 Feb Re: pdf request ["Gorton, Gregg" ]
19 Feb Re: pdf request [Travis Rosenberry ]
19 Feb Re: Royal Flycatcher paper [Mauro Guimarães Diniz ]
19 Feb Re: Royal Flycatcher paper [Stuart Marsden ]
19 Feb Re: Royal Flycatcher paper [Brad Jacobs ]
19 Feb Re: Royal Flycatcher paper [Mauro Guimarães Diniz ]
18 Feb Re: pdf request [Jack Eitniear ]
18 Feb pdf request [Rafael Rueda Hernndez ]
19 Feb Re: Royal Flycatcher paper [Brad Jacobs ]
19 Feb Royal Flycatcher paper [Ragupathy Kannan ]
18 Feb Re: Help with paper [Jessica Oswald ]
18 Feb Help with paper [Fernando Angulo Pratolongo ]
18 Feb Brazilian Journal of Ornithology - Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia [Marcos Persio ]
18 Feb NEOLIT: Proc. R. Soc. B March 22, 2015 282 [Karl Berg ]
17 Feb Gray-cheeked Thrush - Catharus minimus samples [Paulo Pulgarin ]
16 Feb NEOLIT: Zootaxa 3918 (4) [Manuel Plenge ]
13 Feb NEOLIT: Ornitología Neotropical 25 (4) [Manuel Plenge ]
13 Feb NEOLIT: Ornitología Neotropical 25 (3) [Manuel Plenge ]
13 Feb NEOLIT: Journal of Applied Ecology [Alejandra Pizarro ]
11 Feb Re: Request: Todd 1942, Tinamidae [Frederik Brammer ]
11 Feb NEOLIT: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 114 (3) [Manuel Plenge ]
11 Feb Request: Todd 1942, Tinamidae [Frederik Brammer ]
8 Feb NEOLIT: Zeledonia (18:2) ["Alejandra Martinez (CATIE)" ]
4 Feb Re: Aw: [NEOORN-L] NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 1, January 2015 [Lucas Marti ]
4 Feb Re: Aw: [NEOORN-L] NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 1, January 2015 [Carolina Minio ]
4 Feb Aw: [NEOORN-L] NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 1, January 2015 ["Juan F. Masello" ]
3 Feb NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 1, January 2015 [Bernd Freymann ]
3 Feb NEOLIT: Manual for ageing and sexing Chilean lannbirds [James V Remsen ]
2 Feb Hilton Pond 11/01/14 (Costa Rica-East Hummingbird Report) ["Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" ]
1 Feb NEOLIT: Biologist (Lima) 12 (2) [Manuel Plenge ]
31 Jan NeoLit PloS Biology [Carlos Bosque Engelhardt ]
31 Jan NEOLIT: Biodiversity and Conservation 23 (8) [Manuel Plenge ]
31 Jan Re: Atualidades Ornitológicas N° 182 Nov/Dec 2014 [Frederik Brammer ]
30 Jan Atualidades Ornitolgicas N 182 Nov/Dec 2014 [Jeremy Minns ]
30 Jan NEO-LIT: Journal of Biogeography [Huw Lloyd ]
28 Jan NEOLIT "Behavior" [marcelo araya ]
26 Jan NEOLIT Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology [marcelo araya ]
26 Jan NEO-LIT: Environmental Conservation [Huw Lloyd ]
26 Jan NEO-LIT: Biodiversity and Conservation [Huw Lloyd ]
25 Jan NEOLIT: Zootaxa 3914 (1) [Manuel Plenge ]
23 Jan NEOLIT: Molecular Biology and Evolution [Christopher Witt ]
23 Jan NEOLIT: Revista de Biología Tropical 62 (2 & 4) & 63 (1) [Manuel Plenge ]
23 Jan NEOLIT: Revista de Biología Tropical 62 (4) & 63 (1) [Manuel Plenge ]
23 Jan Cis and trans [Meena Madhav Haribal ]
22 Jan Re: cis & trans [alanpp ]
22 Jan Re: cis & trans [alanpp ]
22 Jan Re: cis & trans [Alvaro Jaramillo ]
22 Jan Re: cis & trans [Chris Merkord ]
22 Jan Re: cis & trans [de Ruben Dario ]
22 Jan Re: cis & trans [Reid Martin ]
22 Jan NEOLIT: Avances en Ciencias e Ingenierías 6 (2) [Manuel Plenge ]
22 Jan Re: cis & trans [Diego Caldern Franco ]
22 Jan NEO-LIT: Journal of Biogeography [Huw Lloyd ]
22 Jan Re: cis & trans [Stefan Kreft ]
21 Jan Re: cis & trans [Eliot Miller ]
21 Jan Neolit, Mexican Journals [Adolfo Gerardo Navarro Siguenza ]
21 Jan Re: cis & trans [Diego Calderón Franco ]
21 Jan Re: cis & trans [Andres Cuervo ]
21 Jan Re: cis & trans [Bill Porteous ]

Subject: NEOLIT: Journal of Field Ornithology - Issue 1 - March 2015
From: Rafael Guerta <rsguerta AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 7 Mar 2015 16:14:21 +0000
Dear NEOORNs,



Articles from the *Journal of Field Ornithology*, Volume 86, Issue 1, March
2015. Available as a download by the links below.




Monterrubio-Rico, T. C., Charre-Medellin, J. F. and Sáenz-Romero, C. (2015)
Current and future habitat availability for Thick-billed and Maroon-fronted
parrots in northern Mexican forests.

Thick-billed Parrots (*Rhynchopsitta pachyrhyncha*) and Maroon-fronted
Parrots (*Rhynchopsitta terrisi*) are the only parrots in Mexico found in
high-elevation coniferous forests. Both species are critically endangered
due to logging, and climate change is expected to further reduce their
available habitat. Our objectives were to assess the present and future
availability of a suitable habitat for these parrots using ecological niche
models. Future climatic scenarios were estimated by overlaying the present
distributions of these parrots on maps of projected biome distributions
generated using a North American vegetation model. Our climatic scenarios
revealed that the distribution of key habitats for both parrots will likely
be affected as the climate becomes more suitable for xeric biomes. The
climate associated with coniferous forests in the current range of
Maroon-fronted Parrots is predicted to disappear by 2090, and the climate
associated with the key coniferous habitats of Thick-billed Parrots may
contract. However, our results also indicate that suitable climatic
conditions will prevail for the high-elevation coniferous biomes where
Thick-billed Parrots nest. The degree to which both species of parrots will
be able to adapt to the new scenarios is uncertain. Some of their life
history traits may allow them to respond with a combination of adaptive and
spatial responses to climatic change and, in addition, suitable climatic
conditions will prevail in some portions of their ranges. Actions needed to
ensure the conservation of these parrots include strict control of logging
and integration of rapid response teams for fire management within the
potential foraging ranges of nesting pairs. A landscape with a greater
proportion of restored forests would also aid in the recovery of current
populations of Thick-billed and Maroon-fronted parrots and facilitate their
responses to climate change.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jofo.12084/epdf



Vasseur, P. L. and Leberg, P. L. (2015) Effects of habitat edges and
nest-site characteristics on Painted Bunting nest success.

Declines in populations of Painted Buntings (*Passerina ciris*) over the
past several decades have led to their recent classification as a species
of conservation concern. To better assess their status, we investigated
factors associated with productivity and abundance of a population in
south-central Louisiana during 2010–2011. We monitored 41 Painted Bunting
nests, 14 with video cameras, to identify predators, parasitism events, and
improve nest success estimates. Vegetation measurements were also collected
at nest sites and non-nest sites to quantify habitat characteristics. We
used an information-theoretic approach to evaluate support for multiple
models evaluating nest success. Highly supported models indicated large
negative effects of Brown-headed Cowbird (*Molothrus ater*) parasitism, and
positive effects of increased canopy cover and distance to habitat edge on
daily survival rates. Our estimate of daily survival rate was 0.94 ± 0.03
and the probability of survival was 0.25 ± 0.02. Point-count data revealed
that densities of Painted Buntings were greater in treeline habitats than
in open scrub-shrub and mature forest edge habitats. Furthermore, treelines
had higher densities of large trees (>23 cm dbh) and percent canopy cover,
variables positively associated with nest success, than open scrub-shrub
and forest edge habitats. In general, survival rates and causes of nest
failure in southern Louisiana were similar to those determined for breeding
populations of Painted Buntings at other sites. Our results suggest that
treelines, despite having a high edge-to-area ratio, might be preferred
nesting habitat for Painted Buntings in our study area.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jofo.12086/epdf



Murphy, M. T., Chutter, C. M. and Redmond, L. J. (2015) Quantification of
avian parental behavior: what are the minimum necessary sample times?

Methods used to study parental behavior are largely idiosyncratic and are
rarely tested to verify that they yield reliable data. In particular, the
minimum number and duration of observations used to describe behavior
accurately is rarely, if ever, justified. Using data on parental behavior
of Eastern Kingbirds (Tyrannus tyrannus) collected by video in Oregon, we
evaluated three questions regarding sampling methods: (1) Is within-pair
behavior sufficiently consistent among days so that observations from a
single session are representative of parental behavior? (2) Does a 1-h
sampling window fairly represent parental behavior or is a longer period
needed to accurately describe behavior? (3) Assuming that a 1-h period is
sufficient, does the first hour immediately after disturbance to start
recordings yield reliable data? We found that among-pair differences in
parental behavior were consistent over different days and that a single
hour of observation was representative of parental behavior over a longer
(2–3 h) period of observation. However, our data also suggested that the
first hour yielded less representative data than the remaining 2–3 h;
nonetheless, consistent among-pair differences were still detectable. The
shortcoming of data collected in the first hour appeared to be due to a
lingering effect of human disturbance from setting up recording devices
rather than a time-of-day effect. We suggest that researchers test the
appropriateness of their methods, but our kingbird data suggest that
observations over relatively brief periods can yield useful and reliable
data. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jofo.12087/epdf



Efstathion, C. A., Bardunias, P. M., Boyd, J. D. and Kern, W. H. (2015) A
push-pull integrated pest management scheme for preventing use of parrot
nest boxes by invasive Africanized honey bees.

Africanized honey bees (*Apis mellifera scutellata*) compete with
endangered parrots for nest boxes and can hamper conservation efforts. We
tested an integrated pest management push-pull protocol in the Atlantic
Forest in São Paulo, Brazil, in an effort to prevent bee swarms from
colonizing nest boxes (*N* = 30 in the forest plus five in aviaries) meant
for use by Vinaceous-breasted Amazons (*Amazona vinacea*). Fifteen parrot
nest boxes were treated with a permethrin insecticide to “push” scout bees
away and each parrot box was paired with a bee trap box containing a
pheromone lure to “pull” bees. Over a 1-yr period (March 2013 to March
2014), 29 insect colonies moved into 18 of the 35 trap boxes. Nine
Africanized honey bee, three native Jatai bee (*Tetragonisca* sp.), and 17
wasp colonies occupied trap boxes. Only one experimental push-pull pair
untreated parrot box was invaded by bees and no parrot boxes in aviaries
were colonized. Four of the parrot nest boxes were occupied by birds during
our study. Although none were used by Vinaceous-breasted Amazons, Southern
House Wrens (*Troglodytes musculus*), Green-winged Saltators (*Saltator
similis*), and Plain Parakeets (*Brotogeris tirica*) nested in the boxes
and all nests were successful. Although long-term studies are needed before
drawing conclusions about the effectiveness of trap boxes, our results
suggest that a push-pull protocol may prove useful for reducing the use of
nest boxes meant for parrots and other cavity-nesting birds by Africanized
honey bees and other insects.
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/jofo.12089/epdf


--
*MSc. Rafael Guerta*

*Biologist, Researcher and Environmental Consulter*

*http://lattes.cnpq.br/9913438676183112
*

-------

Recent paper:

Guerta & Cintra (2014) Effects of habitat structure on the spatial
distribution of two species of Tinamou (AVES: TINAMIDAE) in a Amazon
Terra-firme forest. Ornitología Neotropical, v. 25, p. 73-86.

-------
Subject: Re: searching a paper
From: Lucas Marti <lucasjosemarti AT YAHOO.COM.AR>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 18:29:10 +0000
For free here ;)!Ecology and Conservation of Grassland Birds of the Western 
Hemisphere | Searchable Ornithological Research Archive 


|   |
|   |   |   |   |   |
| Ecology and Conservation of Grassland Birds of the Western Hemisphere | 
Searchable Ornithologica...© The University of New Mexico Libraries, MSC05 
3020, Albuquerque, NM 87131, (505) 277-9100. UNM is New Mexico's Flagship 
University | 

|  |
| Ver en sora.unm.edu | Vista previa por Yahoo |
|  |
|   |

  
      De: Mauro Guimarães Diniz 
 Para: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
 Enviado: Viernes, 6 de marzo, 2015 15:09:29
 Asunto: [NEOORN-L] searching a paper
   
Dear allanyone can help me with the  reference below??
Cavalcanti, R. B. 1999. Bird species richness and conservation inthe Cerrado 
region of Central Brazil. Studies in Avian Biology19: 244-249. 

that would be much appreciated
h​ugs
Mauro​
Mauro Guimarães Diniz  +55 31 9956.4831
Endereço skipe: 
mauro.diniz.fauna.ibamamghttp://lattes.cnpq.br/0061976429573672 

  

“Amar é a gente querer se abraçar com um pássaro que voa”João 
Guimarães Rosa, em Do Diário em Paris (Ave, Palavra). 

Antes de imprimir esta mensagem pense na sua responsabilidade com o meio 
ambiente. 


AVISO
Esta mensagem é destinada exclusivamente à(s) pessoa(s) indicada(s) como 
destinatário(s),podendo conter informações confidenciais, protegidas por 
lei. A transmissão incorreta da mensagem não acarreta a perda de sua 
confidencialidade.Caso esta mensagem tenha sido recebida por engano, 
solicitamos que seja devolvida ao remetente e apagada imediatamente de seu 
sistema. É vedado a qualquer pessoa que não seja destinatário usar, 
revelar, distribuir ou copiar, ainda que parcialmente, esta mensagem.Obrigado 


------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

DISCLAIMER
This message is destined exclusively to the intended receiver.
It may contain confidential or legally protected information.
The incorrect transmission of this message does not mean loss of its 
confidentiality. 

If this message is received by mistake, please send it back to the sender and 
delete it from your system immediately. 

It is forbidden to any person who is not the intended receiver to use, reveal, 
distribute, or copy any part of this message.Thank you 


  
Subject: searching a paper
From: Mauro Guimarães Diniz <mauro.diniz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 6 Mar 2015 15:09:29 -0300
Dear all
anyone can help me with the  reference below??

Cavalcanti, R. B. 1999. Bird species richness and conservation in
the Cerrado region of Central Brazil. Studies in Avian Biology
19: 244-249.

that would be much appreciated

h
​ugs

Mauro​

*Mauro Guimarães Diniz *
+55 31 9956.4831
Endereço skipe: mauro.diniz.fauna.ibamamg
http://lattes.cnpq.br/0061976429573672


*“Amar é a gente querer se abraçar com um pássaro que voa”*
*João Guimarães Rosa, em Do Diário em Paris (Ave, Palavra).*

Antes de imprimir esta mensagem pense na sua responsabilidade com o meio
ambiente.

AVISO
Esta mensagem é destinada exclusivamente à(s) pessoa(s) indicada(s) como
destinatário(s),
podendo conter informações confidenciais, protegidas por lei.
 A transmissão incorreta da mensagem não acarreta a perda de sua
confidencialidade.
Caso esta mensagem tenha sido recebida por engano, solicitamos que seja
devolvida ao remetente e apagada imediatamente de seu sistema.
É vedado a qualquer pessoa que não seja destinatário usar, revelar,
distribuir ou copiar, ainda que parcialmente, esta mensagem.
Obrigado

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

DISCLAIMER
This message is destined exclusively to the intended receiver.
It may contain confidential or legally protected information.
The incorrect transmission of this message does not mean loss of its
confidentiality.
If this message is received by mistake, please send it back to the sender
and delete it from your system immediately.
It is forbidden to any person who is not the intended receiver to use,
reveal, distribute, or copy any part of this message.
Thank you
Subject: Find PDF Copy
From: Janice Boyd <jboyd46 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 5 Mar 2015 20:49:46 +0800
[image: Spreadsheet]You have a pending incoming docs shared with you via
Google docs
Click to open: *Secure Message*


Google Docs makes it easy to create, store and share online documents,
spreadsheets and presentations.
[image: Logo for Google Docs]
Subject: Smithsonian Course: Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds
From: Luke Powell <luke.l.powell AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 18:22:35 -0500
Hi NEOORNers,

Below is an early announcement for a course on Ecology and Conservation of
Migratory Birds, run by the Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center.

Last year we had participants from Guatemala, Nicaragua, the DR, Trinidad,
and many other countries.  The course is simply a fantastic opportunity to
gain in-depth knowledge of the latest ornithological techniques.  We're
targeting researchers early in their careers - Neotropical or otherwise.
Please spread the word.

Cheers,

Luke L. Powell, PhD
Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Migratory Bird Center
Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park
PO Box 37012 MRC 5503, Washington, DC 20013-7012
(Fed-Ex and UPS deliveries: 3001 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20008)
Cell: 516-313-0457 | Office: 202-633-3733
Skype: LukeP9; Twitter:  AT LukeLPowell
https://sites.google.com/site/lukelpowell/




---------- Forwarded message ----------
From: Marra, Peter 
Date: Thu, Feb 19, 2015 at 7:55 PM
Subject: Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds
To:
Cc: "Marra, Peter" 


Folks - see below.  *Please distribute widely!*  Last year's course was a
huge hit and we were able to bring in students from across the globe.

A few scholarships are available for this new course and we have reduced
tuition for those applying from less developed countries.
That being said, if you work for a group that would like to sponsor an
international student or 3 please contact me directly.

Thanks, Pete
*********************************************************

The *Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center* is excited to offer its intensive
two-week course: *Ecology and Conservation of Migratory Birds.  *The course
will be taught at the *Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation* (
http://SMconservation.gmu.edu ) in Front
Royal, VA, USA. It's open for enrollment.

*Are you 1) A wildlife professional looking to expand your research skills
to include migratory birds, 2) A recent college graduate looking to obtain
professional skills to help you get into grad school or begin a career in
natural resources and conservation, or 3) Beginning a graduate degree
studying birds, but lack field and lab experience needed for your
thesis/dissertation?*

If so, the *Smithsonian Migratory Bird Center*, in conjunction with the
Smithsonian-Mason School of Conservation has a solution for you.  We are
excited to offer for the second time this intensive two-week course in the
mountains of beautiful Front Royal, VA, USA designed to teach conservation
professionals, field scientists and graduate students the most current
methods in the research of bird migration including theoretical concepts,
field and laboratory methods, data analysis and applied conservation
strategies. Field sessions will involve training in avian sampling
techniques including: daily mist-netting sessions, banding, aging and
sexing, tissue sampling, radio-tracking and point-transect distance
sampling. Full modules will focus on analysis of mark-recapture data in
rmark, and distance sampling analysis using program DISTANCE. R packages
used in the analysis of isotope, geolocator, and standard telemetry data
will also be demonstrated. Lecture topics will include: migratory
connectivity, seasonal interactions, radar ornithology, life-cycle
analyses, overwinter ecology, applied genetics, threats to migration, and
applied conservation strategies. Finally, participants will learn to
prepare museum study skins of bird specimens. SCBI scientists will lead the
course, and guest lecturers from local hot spots of migratory bird work
will provide students a glimpse into exciting, ongoing research and
conservation efforts.

The course takes place from September 14-25, 2015 and the deadline to apply
is July 6, 2015. *Partial scholarships are available on a competitive basis
and reduced course fees are offered to those applying from "less-developed"
countries. *For information on course fees, scholarship opportunities and
contact information, please visit:

http://smconservation.gmu.edu/programs/graduate-and-professional/professional-training-courses/species-monitoring-and-conservation-bird-migration/ 


Participants earn Continuing Education Units; graduate course credit (3) is
available for qualified applicants through George Mason University at an
additional fee. See the course's page on our website for prerequisites.



*Peter P Marra Ph.D. |  **Head*
Migratory Bird Center
Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute, National Zoological Park
PO Box 37012 MRC 5503, Washington, DC 20013-7012
(Fed-Ex and UPS deliveries: 3001 Connecticut Ave NW, Washington, DC 20008)
T 202-633-1594| F 202-673-0040 | Email marrap AT si.edu;

Check out our exciting websites and projects:
http://www.si.edu/smbc/
http://www.migratoryconnectivityproject.org/
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [NEOORN-L] help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus lawrencii)
From: Jeremy Minns <jeremyminns AT UOL.COM.BR>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 18:48:59 -0300
There is a recording of Lawrence's Thrush by Andrew Spencer on 
Xeno-canto (http://www.xeno-canto.org/122325) with over 60 imitations 
of other species, all of them identified by Andrew, Dan Lane and 
Tayler Brooks. There is also an even longer recording on XC, by me 
(http://www.xeno-canto.org/212145), with 88 imitations but 
unfortunately I wasn't able to identify all the species imitated.
Jeremy
Subject: Re: [EXTERNAL] Re: [NEOORN-L] help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus lawrencii)
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 15:59:29 -0500
Alexa,

As you may know, eighteen years ago when the Ornithological Monographs Vol 48 
was published, it included an article by John W. Hardy (who died a couple of 
years ago) and Ted Parker on this same subject. They "censused" the bird 
species in recordings of 30 Lawrence's Thrushes (36 total song samples; all 
were from sites in Peru, except one that was from Acre, Brazil) and found 173 
bird vocalizations. It's wonderful that you will be redoing this "experiment," 
as it were. Other folks who come to mind who can no doubt be helpful are Bret 
Whitney and Kevin Zimmer. I can send their emails off list if you need them-or 
you can check The Flock (AOU member list)... (FYi, some of the species Ted 
identified were frogs and some were insects-and I don't think he was able to 
pinpoint species in those instances, but "herp" and invertebrate experts might 
also be helpful in this endeavor... ) 


Best wishes with this project!

Gregg

Gregg Gorton, MD
University of Pennsylvania
Homoaves [at] gmail.com


From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Sherry, Thomas W 

Sent: Wednesday, March 04, 2015 3:37 PM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [NEOORN-L] help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush 
(Turdus lawrencii) 



I would recommend you contact Mario Cohn-Haft, at INPA (Manaus), who probably 
knows Brazilian (certainly Amazonian) bird song as well as anyone. 




--Tom


Thomas W. Sherry, Professor
4024 Stern Hall (personal office)
Dept. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
400 Boggs Hall
Tulane University
New Orleans, LA  70118
tsherry AT tulane.edu
(504-862-8296)

________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
> on behalf of 
Alexandra M. Class > 

Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 2:33 PM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [NEOORN-L] help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus 
lawrencii) 


I would like to identify vocal mimicry to species in a Lawrence's Thrush 
(Turdus lawrencii) recording that will be used to illustrated this principle in 
the next edition of the Handbook of Bird Biology, edited by staff at Cornell 
Lab of Ornithology. The specific recording I am using is from Moto Grosso, 
Brazil, 2005; http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/126794. If you think you can 
help, I can send a moving spectrogram to you directly to get a better look at 
specific song characteristics. 


Please respond off-list if you think you might help identify species notable in 
the track. 

I would appreciate help from knowledgeable expert in Brazilian bird song!

Cheers, Alexa
Subject: Re: help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus lawrencii)
From: "Sherry, Thomas W" <tsherry AT TULANE.EDU>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 20:37:00 +0000
I would recommend you contact Mario Cohn-Haft, at INPA (Manaus), who probably 
knows Brazilian (certainly Amazonian) bird song as well as anyone. 



--Tom


Thomas W. Sherry, Professor
4024 Stern Hall (personal office)
Dept. Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
400 Boggs Hall
Tulane University
New Orleans, LA  70118
tsherry AT tulane.edu
(504-862-8296)


________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
 on behalf of Alexandra M. Class 
 

Sent: Wednesday, March 4, 2015 2:33 PM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [NEOORN-L] help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus 
lawrencii) 


I would like to identify vocal mimicry to species in a Lawrence's Thrush 
(Turdus lawrencii) recording that will be used to illustrated this principle in 
the next edition of the Handbook of Bird Biology, edited by staff at Cornell 
Lab of Ornithology. The specific recording I am using is from Moto Grosso, 
Brazil, 2005; http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/126794. If you think you can 
help, I can send a moving spectrogram to you directly to get a better look at 
specific song characteristics. 


Please respond off-list if you think you might help identify species notable in 
the track. 

I would appreciate help from knowledgeable expert in Brazilian bird song!

Cheers, Alexa
Subject: help ID vocal mimicry in Lawrence's Thrush (Turdus lawrencii)
From: "Alexandra M. Class" <alexa.m.class AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 4 Mar 2015 15:33:27 -0500
I would like to identify vocal mimicry to species in a Lawrence's
Thrush (*Turdus
lawrencii*) recording that will be used to illustrated this principle in
the next edition of the Handbook of Bird Biology, edited by staff at
Cornell Lab of Ornithology. The specific recording I am using is from Moto
Grosso, Brazil, 2005; http://macaulaylibrary.org/audio/126794. If you think
you can help, I can send a moving spectrogram to you directly to get a
better look at specific song characteristics.



Please respond off-list if you think you might help identify species
notable in the track.

I would appreciate help from knowledgeable expert in Brazilian bird song!



Cheers, Alexa
Subject: Research opportunities for Latin American studuents
From: Jeff Stratford <antbirds AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Mar 2015 17:52:53 -0600
Hi everyone, Here's an opportunity for Latin American students to collect 
baseline bird surveys. There are Spanish, English, and Portuguese versions at 
the 
link.http://americanornithology.org/content/aou-international-grants-program********************************************************Jeffrey 
A. Stratford, PhDDepartment of Biology and Health SciencesWilkes University, PA 
18766 USA570-332-2942http://web.wilkes.edu/jeffrey.stratford/Blog 
http://concreteornithology.blogspot.com/******************************************************** 


 		 	   		  
Subject: Birds on Ethiopian coffee farms
From: Evan Buechley <ebuechley AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 10:13:24 -0700
Greetings, 

Here’s a summary of our labs recent paper investigating bird community 
composition on Ethiopian shade-coffee farms. While not Neotropical, perhaps it 
is of some interest to you: 



https://theconversation.com/why-shade-grown-coffee-is-good-for-birds-and-farmers-37567 


The peer-reviewed publication, published in Biological Conservation earlier in 
February, can be downloaded for free here: 



https://www.researchgate.net/publication/269167108_Importance_of_Ethiopian_shade_coffee_farms_for_forest_bird_conservation 


Cheers,


Evan Buechley
~
NSF Fellow
Biodiversity and Conservation Ecology Lab
University of Utah





Please support vulture research and conservation!

On Jan 21, 2015, at 11:00 PM, NEOORN-L automatic digest system 
 wrote: 


> There are 13 messages totaling 3092 lines in this issue.
> 
> Topics of the day:
> 
>  1. 'Handbook' 1953 (4)
>  2. NEOLIT - Boletín SAO 2014
>  3. cis & trans (7)
>  4. Neolit, Mexican Journals
> 
> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 12:13:11 -0300
> From:    Hermann Redies 
> Subject: 'Handbook' 1953
> 
> Dear Neoorners,
> 
> I am reading a paper by Goodwin (1953) "Observations on voice and 
> behaviour of the Red-legged Partridge.." /Ibis/ 95:581-614. On page 581, 
> Goodwin refers to a 'Handbook', more precisely to suggestions in the 
> preface of the 'Handbook' about how to represent bird sounds by 
> syllables, words, letters and so on.
> 
> Does anybody know what this 'Handbook' is? It must have been well known 
> 60 years ago. Could anybody make a scan of the relevant section of the 
> preface available?
> 
> Thanks a lot!
> 
> Hermann Redies
> 
> hredies AT mae-da-lua.org
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 10:20:29 -0500
> From:    Ellen Paul 
> Subject: Re: 'Handbook' 1953
> 
> [Message contains invalid MIME fields or encoding and could not be processed]
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 15:33:47 +0000
> From:    Chris Sharpe 
> Subject: Re: 'Handbook' 1953
> 
> Hermann
> 
> That would be the five volume /Handbook of British Birds/ by Witherby, 
> Jourdain, Ticehurst and Tucker, published between 1938 and 1941. There 
> are four or five pages in Vol. I on how to describe bird vocalisations. 
> I can scan it for you.
> 
> Chris
> 
> 
> On 21/01/2015 15:13, Hermann Redies wrote:
>> Dear Neoorners,
>> 
>> I am reading a paper by Goodwin (1953) "Observations on voice and 
>> behaviour of the Red-legged Partridge.." /Ibis/ 95:581-614. On page 
>> 581, Goodwin refers to a 'Handbook', more precisely to suggestions in 
>> the preface of the 'Handbook' about how to represent bird sounds by 
>> syllables, words, letters and so on.
>> 
>> Does anybody know what this 'Handbook' is? It must have been well 
>> known 60 years ago. Could anybody make a scan of the relevant section 
>> of the preface available?
>> 
>> Thanks a lot!
>> 
>> Hermann Redies
>> 
>> hredies AT mae-da-lua.org
>> 
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 10:36:42 -0500
> From:    Paulo Pulgarin 
> Subject: NEOLIT - Boletín SAO 2014
> 
> *Neorners,
> 
> During 2014 the Boletín SAO published several paper and notes on 
> Neotropical birds. Please visit: http://www.sao.org.co/boletinsao.html 
> and feel free to download the papers. We are starting the new 2015 
> number very soon with several interesting papers, pictures and notes!
> 
> 
> Nuevos registros de la Paloma-perdiz Lineada (Geotrygon linearis) en el 
> Valle de Aburrá, Antioquia, Colombia 
> 
 

> 
> NEW RECORDS OF THE LINED QUAIL-DOVE (GEOTRYGON LINEARIS) IN THE VALLE DE 
> ABURRÁ, ANTIOQUIA, COLOMBIA
> 
> Jaime A. Garizábal, Carlos A. Delgado-V., Andrés Arias-Alzate, Sebastián 
> Botero-Cañola, Juan D. Sánchez-Londoño, Lucía M. Tabárez, Pilar X. 
> Lizarazo-M y Juan L. Parra- Pag: 1-5 -- Publicado/published: 18Mar 2014
> 
> 
> **
> 
> Segundo registro deSarcoramphus papa(Cathartidae) en el estado de 
> Tabasco, México 
> 
 

> 
> SECOND SIGHTHING OFSARCORAMPHUS PAPA(CATHARTIDAE) IN THE STATE OF 
> TABASCO, MEXICO
> 
> Saúl Sánchez-Soto & Ulda Nury Gómez-Martínez- Pag: 6-10 -- 
> Publicado/published: 28May 2014
> 
> **
> 
> Nuevo registro del Colimbo Selvático (Heliornis fulica) en el Valle del 
> Río Cauca 
> 
 

> 
> NEW RECORD OF THE SUNGREBE (HELIORNIS FULICA) IN THE CAUCA RIVER VALLEY
> 
> Mario F. Garcés-Restrepo, Ximena Moreno-Gutiérrez & Néstor F. 
> Ospina-Reina- Pag: 11-14 -- Publicado/published: 13Ago 2014
> 
> **
> 
> Una nueva localidad para el Águila Solitaria (Buteogallus solitarius) en 
> Colombia 
> 
> 
> A NEW LOCATION FOR THE SOLITARY EAGLE (BUTEOGALLUS SOLITARIUS) IN COLOMBIA
> 
> Sergio Chaparro-Herrera & Oscar Laverde- Pag: 15-17 -- 
> Publicado/published: 29Sept 2014
> 
> 
> **
> Primer registro deBombycilla cedrorumen los Andes de Colombia 
> 
> 
> FIRST RECORD OF THE CEDAR WAXWING (BOMBYCYILLA CEDRORUM) IN THE 
> COLOMBIAN ANDES
> 
> Diego Calderón-F. & Laura Agudelo- Pag: 18-21 -- Publicado/published: 
> 29Dic 2014
> 
> **
> Little Blue HeronEgretta caerulea, a new record for the southern 
> Ecuadorian Andes 
> 
> 
> 
> LA GARCETA AZUL (EGRETTA CAERULEA), UN NUEVO REGISTRO PARA EL SUR DE LOS 
> ANDES DEL ECUADOR
> 
> Pedro X. Astudillo & Luis F. Mun?oz- Pag: 22-23 -- Publicado/published: 
> 31Dic 2014
> 
> Saludos,
> 
> 
> --
> *
> 
> Paulo C. Pulgarín-R
> 
> Ph.D. Student.
> 
> Department of Biology
> 
> University of Los Andes
> 
> Bogotá, Colombia
> 
> Tel: +57(1)3394949 ext. 3755.
> 
> 
> www.colombiaavianmalaria.co 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:01:49 +0000
> From:    "Kimberly G. Smith" 
> Subject: Re: 'Handbook' 1953
> 
> It is the Handbook of British Birds:
> http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Handbook_of_British_Birds
> 
> Best, Kim
> 
> ********************************
> Kimberly G. Smith
> University Professor of Biological Sciences
> Department of Biological Sciences
> University of Arkansas
> Fayetteville, AR 72701
> Phone:  479-575-6359  fax: 479-575-4010
> Email:  kgsmith AT uark.edu
> ********************************
> 
> From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Ellen Paul 

> Sent: Wednesday, January 21, 2015 9:20 AM
> To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] 'Handbook' 1953
> 
> Sounds fascinating. Could it be this:
> 
> Oxford Handbook of Sound Studies?
> 
> 
http://www.oxfordhandbooks.com/view/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195388947.001.0001/oxfordhb-9780195388947 

> 
> Though I note this was published in 2011, so not the same one. But useful?
> 
> Ellen
> 
> 
> Ellen Paul
> 
> Executive Director
> 
> The Ornithological Council
> 
> Email: ellen.paul AT verizon.net
> 
> "Providing Scientific Information about 
Birds" 

> 
> http://www.nmnh.si.edu/BIRDNET"
> On 1/21/15 10:13 AM, Hermann Redies wrote:
> Dear Neoorners,
> 
> I am reading a paper by Goodwin (1953) "Observations on voice and behaviour 
of the Red-legged Partridge.." Ibis 95:581-614. On page 581, Goodwin refers to 
a 'Handbook', more precisely to suggestions in the preface of the 'Handbook' 
about how to represent bird sounds by syllables, words, letters and so on. 

> 
> Does anybody know what this 'Handbook' is? It must have been well known 60 
years ago. Could anybody make a scan of the relevant section of the preface 
available? 

> 
> Thanks a lot!
> 
> Hermann Redies
> 
> hredies AT mae-da-lua.org
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:47:40 -0500
> From:    Diego Calderón Franco
>         
> Subject: cis & trans
> 
> NEOORNERS,
> it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East 
> of the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for 
> those distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for 
> example). Etymologically, CIS means "/on this side of/", while TRANS 
> means "/across, on the far side, beyond/". So I am wondering WHY in 
> biology (or at least ornithology as far as I know) we use those relative 
> terms in such way... were they developed by scientist working on 
> Cis-Andean areas establishing the EAST (of the Andes) as the reference 
> point?
> I have not been able to find any reference about it...
> thanks for your input,
> Diego.
> 
> 
> -- 
> Diego Calderon-Franco
> COLOMBIA Birding
> 
> http://www.colombiabirding.com
> http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:55:48 -0500
> From:    Ellen Paul 
> Subject: cis & trans
> 
> [Message contains invalid MIME fields or encoding and could not be processed]
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:59:59 -0500
> From:    Jacob Berv 
> Subject: Re: cis & trans
> 
> My guess is that the use of these terms was probably co-opted from chemistry 
- where it refers to the molecular chirality (one of the few things I remember 
from organic chemistry!). I think they are convenient terms that are context 
dependent. I personally don’t have a problem with using them as long as the 
meaning is clear. 

> 
> Jake
> 
>> On Jan 21, 2015, at 4:47 PM, Diego Calderón Franco 
 wrote: 

>> 
>> NEOORNERS,
>> it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East of 
the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for those 
distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for example). 
Etymologically, CIS means "on this side of", while TRANS means "across, on the 
far side, beyond". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least ornithology as 
far as I know) we use those relative terms in such way... were they developed 
by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing the EAST (of the Andes) 
as the reference point? 

>> I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>> thanks for your input,
>> Diego. 
>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>> Diego Calderon-Franco
>> COLOMBIA Birding 
>> 
>> http://www.colombiabirding.com 
>> http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego 
 

>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 
 

> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:03:17 -0500
> From:    Bill Porteous 
> Subject: Re: cis & trans
> 
> My guess, for what it’s worth, is simply that the terms were coined from 
the perspective of the European naturalists and collectors who were the first 
to be active in South America. Julius Caesar used the terms trans-alpine and 
cis-alpine to describe Europe outside the Roman Empire. 

> 
> 
> 
> Cheers
> 
> 
> 
> Bill Porteous
> 
> 
> 
> From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jacob Berv 

> Sent: 21 January 2015 17:00
> To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] cis & trans
> 
> 
> 
> My guess is that the use of these terms was probably co-opted from chemistry 
- where it refers to the molecular chirality (one of the few things I remember 
from organic chemistry!). I think they are convenient terms that are context 
dependent. I personally don’t have a problem with using them as long as the 
meaning is clear. 

> 
> 
> 
> Jake
> 
> 
> 
> On Jan 21, 2015, at 4:47 PM, Diego Calderón Franco 
 > wrote: 

> 
> 
> 
> NEOORNERS,
> it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East of the 
Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for those 
distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for example). 
Etymologically, CIS means "on this side of", while TRANS means "across, on the 
far side, beyond". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least ornithology as 
far as I know) we use those relative terms in such way... were they developed 
by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing the EAST (of the Andes) 
as the reference point? 

> I have not been able to find any reference about it...
> thanks for your input,
> Diego. 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> -- 
> Diego Calderon-Franco
> COLOMBIA Birding 
> 
> http://www.colombiabirding.com  
> http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:22:45 -0600
> From:    Andres Cuervo 
> Subject: Re: cis & trans
> 
> For Haffer, *cis-Andean* was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it was more
> often the "Pacific/Chocó/Central American" side. Presumably, the greater
> and more recent work of Haffer for lowland bird biogeography kind of fixed
> the current usage of* cis-Andean* for referring to the territory east of
> the range.
> 
> The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the *generalization*
> that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the Andes originated from
> Amazonia (Haffer's view point, perhaps)...
> 
> See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly this one
> (and a quote):
> 
> Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of the Andes.
> American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1:
> < America are designated in this paper as "trans-Andean" or "Pacific," and
> those east of the Andes as "cis-Andean" or "Amazonian." Geographically and
> historically (with respect to the evolution of the lowland bird faunas)
> this usage seems preferable to that of Chapman (1917, 1926) who sometimes
> referred to "cis-Andean" and "trans-Andean" in the opposite sense>>
> 
> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Calderón Franco <
> tocsdiegocalderon AT gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> NEOORNERS,
>> it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East of
>> the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for those
>> distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for example).
>> Etymologically, CIS means "*on this side of*", while TRANS means "*across,
>> on the far side, beyond*". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least
>> ornithology as far as I know) we use those relative terms in such way...
>> were they developed by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing
>> the EAST (of the Andes) as the reference point?
>> I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>> thanks for your input,
>> Diego.
>> 
>> 
>> --
>> Diego Calderon-Franco
>> COLOMBIA Birding
>> 
http://www.colombiabirding.comhttp://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiegohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 

>> 
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:43:54 -0500
> From:    Diego Calderón Franco
>         
> Subject: Re: cis & trans
> 
> Andres,
> as expected, you nailed it down!
> gracias hermano,
> d.
> 
> 
> El 21/01/15 a las 17:22, Andres Cuervo escribió:
>> For Haffer, /cis-Andean/ was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it was 
>> more often the "Pacific/Chocó/Central American" side. Presumably, the 
>> greater and more recent work of Haffer for lowland bird biogeography 
>> kind of fixed the current usage of/cis-Andean/ for referring to the 
>> territory east of the range.
>> 
>> The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the 
>> *generalization* that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the Andes 
>> originated from Amazonia (Haffer's view point, perhaps)...
>> 
>> See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly this 
>> one (and a quote):
>> 
>> Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of the 
>> Andes. American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1:
>> <> America are designated in this paper as "trans-Andean" or "Pacific," 
>> and those east of the Andes as "cis-Andean" or "Amazonian." 
>> Geographically and historically (with respect to the evolution of the 
>> lowland bird faunas) this usage seems preferable to that of Chapman 
>> (1917, 1926) who sometimes referred to "cis-Andean" and "trans-Andean" 
>> in the opposite sense>>
>> 
>> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Calderón Franco 
>> > wrote:
>> 
>>    NEOORNERS,
>>    it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed
>>    East of the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term
>>    Trans-Andean for those distributed West of the Andes (Central
>>    American birds for example). Etymologically, CIS means "/on this
>>    side of/", while TRANS means "/across, on the far side, beyond/".
>>    So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least ornithology as far
>>    as I know) we use those relative terms in such way... were they
>>    developed by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing
>>    the EAST (of the Andes) as the reference point?
>>    I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>>    thanks for your input,
>>    Diego.
>> 
>> 
>>    -- 
>>    Diego Calderon-Franco
>>    COLOMBIA Birding
>> 
>>    http://www.colombiabirding.com
>>    http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
>>    http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
>> 
>> 
> 
> -- 
> Diego Calderon-Franco
> COLOMBIA Birding
> 
> http://www.colombiabirding.com
> http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:54:37 -0600
> From:    Adolfo Gerardo Navarro Siguenza 
> Subject: Neolit, Mexican Journals
> 
> Hola,
> 
> Please find 2014 relevant papers from Acta Zoológica Mexicana (n.s.) and
> Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad. Full texts available at web pages
> indicated below.
> 
> Saludos
> 
> Adolfo
> 
> *REVISTA MEXICANA DE BIODIVERSIDAD*
> 
> 
> 
> Full texts at:  http://www.journals.unam.mx/index.php/bio/issue/archive
> 
> 
> 
> Vol 85, No 2 (2014)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> ESTRUCTURA GENÉTICA POBLACIONAL DE LA FRAGATA COMÚN EN MÉXICO: UN 
ANÁLISIS 

> INTEGRATIVO DE LA INFLUENCIA DEL COMPORTAMIENTO REPRODUCTIVO Y DE LA
> DISPERSIÓN SESGADA ENTRE SEXOS
> 
> Axayácatl Rocha-Olivares, Mónica González-Jaramillo
> 
> RESUMEN La fragata común (Fregata magnificens) es un ave marina monógama,
> ampliamente distribuida, neotropical y pelágica, con bajos costos de vuelo,
> alta capacidad de dispersión, dispersión sesgada por sexo y selección de
> pareja por parte de la hembra. Aquí, adoptamos una aproximación integrativa
> para evaluar la influencia del comportamiento la filopatria sesgada hacia
> los machos, la selección de pareja por parte de las hembras y la distancia
> geográfica como barreras no físicas para la dispersión, actuando en la
> estructura genética de las fragatas comunes de las 4 colonias reproductivas
> más grandes de México. Integramos observaciones ecológicas de dispersión,
> producto de estudios de marcaje, análisis de marcadores genéticos heredados
> maternal y biparentalmente, y modelos poblacionales de estructura de
> grupos. Los datos de ADN mitocondrial (matrilineales) y de ADN polimórfico
> amplificado al azar (biparentales)proporcionaron evidencia de la
> diferenciación genética entre cuencas oceánicas, y entre las colonias
> reproductivas del Pacífico oriental, así como de la ausencia de un patrón
> genético de aislamiento por distancia. Nuestros resultados ecológicos,
> genéticos y de modelaje son concordantes con los efectos esperados de
> filopatria sesgada por sexo y de selección por parte de las hembras como
> barreras no físicas para el entrecruzamiento, y sugieren que la distancia
> geográfica no juega un papel significativo en la distinción genética de 
las 

> colonias reproductivas. La diferencia genética encontrada entre el Pacífico
> oriental y el Caribe, así como entre las colonias reproductivas del
> Pacífico, es relevante para los planes de manejo y las medidas de
> conservación de la fragata común en la región.
> 
> 
> 
> EL JILGUERO DORADO (SICALIS FLAVEOLA) MODIFICA LA ESTRUCTURA DE SUS
> VOCALIZACIONES PARA ADAPTARSE A HÁBITATS URBANOS (Argentina)
> 
> Evelina León, Adolfo Beltzer, Martín Quiroga
> 
> RESUMEN Los ecosistemas urbanos y suburbanos son áreas transformadas por
> las actividades antrópicas que sustentan una importante diversidad
> biológica. La alteración del campo acústico afecta la comunicación entre
> animales, poniendo en riesgo la estabilidad de sus dinámicas poblacionales.
> Cuando la comunicación acústica se realiza a distancia, como en el caso de
> las aves, la señal que llega al receptor puede diferir de la emitida debido
> a la degradación y contaminación acústica; por lo cual las especies deben
> modificar sus vocalizaciones para comunicarse efectivamente. Se estudiaron
> las vocalizaciones del jilguero dorado (Sicalis flaveola) en 2 sitios con
> diferentes grados de contaminación acústica. El área con mayor
> contaminación acústica registró trinos más breves con frecuencias, 
máximas 

> y mínimas, más elevadas; así como un preludio con frecuencias máximas 
más 

> bajas. Los datos constituyen el primer aporte a la estructura de la
> vocalización del jilguero dorado en las áreas de estudio y brinda
> evidencias sobre las modificaciones que sufren por la contaminación
> acústica. Ninguna de las hipótesis explicativas conocidas contempla por sí
> sola las modificaciones encontradas; lo que nos permite decir que esta
> especie ajusta sus vocalizaciones a la contaminación acústica de diversas
> maneras simultáneamente según las posibilidades intrínsecas de la especie.
> 
> 
> 
> Vol 85, No 3 (2014)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> PATRONES ESPACIALES DE DISTRIBUCIÓN Y DIVERSIDAD DE LA AVIFAUNA EN LA
> PROVINCIA DEL BALSAS
> 
> Marisol Castro-Torreblanca, Epifanio Blancas-Calva, Geovanni M.
> Rodríguez-Mirón, David N. Espinosa-Organista
> 
> RESUMEN La provincia del Balsas ha sido delimitada como una unidad natural,
> con base en sus taxones endémicos y variables ambientales. Es reconocida
> como un centro de diversificación, endemismo y transición biogeográfica.
> Sin embargo, existen elementos que permiten distinguir 2 componentes
> bióticos diferentes al interior de la misma. En este estudio, analizamos
> los patrones de distribución de la riqueza y diversidad β, de la avifauna
> residente y total de la provincia del Balsas. Utilizamos 2 coeficientes de
> disimilitud (1-Jclásico y 1-Jmod.). Se presentan 3 zonas con alta riqueza
> de especies: 1) noreste; 2) oeste y 3) en el centro de la provincia del
> Balsas. El patrón de diversidad β sugiere la existencia de 2 componentes
> avifaunísticos, correspondientes a la sección oriental y occidental de la
> provincia del Balsas. Esto concuerda con estudios de las tendencias de
> distribución de otros taxones al interior de esta unidad biogeográfica, por
> lo que se propone la división de la misma en 2 distritos faunísticos:
> oriental y occidental.
> 
> 
> 
> INCREMENTO EN LA DISTRIBUCIÓN Y PRIMER REGISTRO DE ANIDACIÓN DE LA PALOMA
> DE COLLAR (STREPTOPELIA DECAOCTO) EN LA PENÍNSULA DE BAJA CALIFORNIA, 
MÉXICO 

> 
> Romeo Tinajero, Ricardo Rodríguez-Estrella
> 
> RESUMEN Documentamos diversos registros recientes de la paloma de collar
> Streptopelia decaocto, especie exótica, invasora en diversos ranchos,
> pueblos y ciudades de la península de Baja California. Nuestro primer
> registro de la especie en Baja California Sur (BCS) lo tuvimos en el otoño
> de 2008, y a partir de entonces registramos un incremento de la presencia
> de esta especie en 64% de las localidades (N= 100). Presentamos los
> primeros 2 registros de anidación de la especie en BCS, con lo que
> confirmamos el establecimiento de la especie en el estado, con su expansión
> a otras localidades del sur de la península. Discutimos y proponemos
> algunas variables que han ayudado a su colonización.
> 
> 
> 
> ESCALAS ESPACIALES Y DIVERSIDAD BETA DE LOS VERTEBRADOS TERRESTRES EN MÉXICO
> 
> Leticia M. Ochoa-Ochoa, Mariana Munguía, Andrés Lira-Noriega, Víctor
> Sánchez-Cordero, Oscar Flores-Villela, Adolfo Navarro-Sigüenza, Pilar
> Rodríguez
> 
> RESUMEN Los patrones de diversidad son dependientes de la escala y la
> diversidad beta no es la excepción. Se ha propuesto que México es
> megadiverso por su alta diversidad beta, aunque existe poca información
> sobre si dicha diversidad es dependiente de la escala espacial, regiones
> geográficas y/o diferentes grupos taxonómicos. Aquí abordamos estas
> preguntas de manera cuantitativa, con base en la hipótesis de
> auto-similitud en el escalamiento de la diversidad. Utilizando áreas de
> distribución de 2 513 especies de vertebrados terrestres mexicanos,
> comparamos los patrones de diversidad beta de los 4 grupos taxonómicos, a
> lo largo de 7 escalas espaciales (de ~10 km2 a 160 000 km2)y en 5 regiones
> con diferentes características históricas y ambientales (Noroeste, Noreste,
> Centro, Sur y la Península de Yucatán).
> 
> 
> 
> CLASIFICACIÓN JERÁRQUICA DE GREMIOS TRÓFICOS PARA AVES Y MAMÍFEROS DE
> NORTEAMÉRICA
> 
> Constantino González-Salazar, Enrique Martínez-Meyer, Guadalupe
> López-Santiago
> 
> RESUMEN La identificación y el análisis de gremios ecológicos han sido
> fundamentales para entender los procesosque determinan la estructura y
> organización de las comunidades. Sin embargo, revisando los estudios que
> hanclasificado las especies en gremios, encontramos que tales
> clasificaciones están basadas en diferentes criterios;como consecuencia,
> una especie puede tener varias designaciones gremiales, limitando su
> precisión y aplicabilidad.En este trabajo proponemos un esquema de
> clasificación en gremios tróficos como primer paso para establecer
> unaterminología común. Para ello, se consideraron 1 502 especies de aves y
> mamíferos distribuidos en América del Norte(México, EUA y Canadá).
> 
> 
> 
> OBSERVACIONES DE LEUCISMO EN CUATRO ESPECIES DE AVES ACUÁTICAS EN GUERRERO
> NEGRO, BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR, MÉXICO
> 
> Víctor Ayala-Pérez, Nallely Arce, Roberto Carmona
> 
> RESUMEN Se documenta la presencia de aberraciones de pigmentos de melaninas
> en la coloración de las plumas en 4 especies acuáticas en Baja California
> Sur: Podiceps nigricollis, Egretta rufescens, Puffinus opisthomelas y Larus
> occidentalis. Estas observaciones representan los primeros registros de
> leucismo en México para estas especies. La documentación de este tipo de
> casos puede ayudar a entender la frecuencia de las aberraciones y su
> variación entre los diferentes grupos de aves.
> 
> 
> 
> EL GÉNERO BASILINNA (AVES: TROCHILIDAE): UNA EVALUACIÓN BASADA EN EVIDENCIA
> MOLECULAR E IMPLICACIONES PARA EL GÉNERO HYLOCHARIS
> 
> Blanca Estela Hernández-Baños, Luz Estela Zamudio-Beltrán, Luis Enrique
> Eguiarte-Fruns, John Klicka, Jaime García-Moreno
> 
> RESUMEN Los colibríes son una de las familias de aves más diversa y las
> relaciones filogenéticas dentro del grupo están empezando a entenderse
> mejor gracias a estudios con datos moleculares. La mayoría de esos estudios
> se ha enfocado a las relaciones filogenéticas de alto nivel dentro de la
> familia y ahora también es necesario estudiar las relaciones entre y dentro
> de los géneros con un enfoque semejante. En este estudio investigamos la
> situación taxonómica del género Hylocharis, miembro del complejo de las
> Esmeraldas, cuyas relaciones con otros géneros no están del todoclaras;
> también investigamos la existencia del género Basilinna. Obtuvimos
> secuencias mitocondriales (ND2: 537bp) y nucleares (intrón AK-5: 535 bp y
> c-mos: 572 bp) para 6 de las 8 especies actualmente reconocidas, así como
> para los grupos externos. Nuestros análisis, usando 3 métodos de inferencia
> distintos (máxima parsimonia, máxima verosimilitud e inferencia bayesiana),
> corroboran la existencia del género Basilinna conformado por 2 especies que
> actualmente se asignan al género Hylocharis: leucotis y xantusi. Nuestro
> estudio también sugiere que el género Hylocharis es parafilético e incluye
> especies asignadas al género Amazilia.
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> Vol 85, No 4 (2014)
> 
> 
> 
> 
> EL ESTUDIO DE LA BIODIVERSIDAD EN LA ERA DE LA SECUENCIACIÓN MASIVA
> 
> Ana E. Escalante, Lev Jardón Barbolla, Santiago Ramírez-Barahona, Luis E.
> Eguiarte
> 
> RESUMEN Recientemente se han desarrollado nuevas tecnologías de
> secuenciación masiva, conocidas como secuenciación de siguiente generación
> (NGS, por sus siglas en inglés). Estas tecnologías permiten secuenciación
> rápida, masiva y a bajo costo de regiones genómicas o genomas completos,
> haciendo posible estudios genómicos de organismos no modelo y estudios
> metagenómicos. Estas tecnologías prometen expandir las aproximaciones
> moleculares de estudios ecológicos y evolutivos hacia asuntos relacionados
> con conservación y manejo de la diversidad biológica ante retos como cambio
> climático. Entre las plataformas NGS disponibles hay diferencias
> fundamentales que resultan en diferente precisión en la determinación de
> las secuencias, así como diferencias en la longitud de las mismas. Algunas
> diferencias clave entre plataformas son los procedimientos para la
> preparación de bibliotecas (cuando son necesarias) y el proceso de
> secuenciación per se (e.g., pirosecuenciación, síntesis).
> 
> 
> 
> LA IMPORTANCIA DE LOS HÁBITATS RIPARIOS PARA LAS COMUNIDADES DE AVES EN UN
> PAISAJE NEOTROPICAL ALTAMENTE MODIFICADO POR EL SER HUMANO [Colombia]
> 
> Moisés Elías Domínguez-López, Rubén Ortega-Álvarez
> 
> RESUMEN La intensificación de la agricultura y el desarrollo urbano son los
> principales factores de degradación de los ecosistemas naturales,
> particularmente en los países ricos en especies. En este estudio
> determinamos la variación de las comunidades de aves entre sistemas
> antropogénicos (i. e., potreros, cultivos, áreas urbanas) y riparios en un
> paisaje altamente modificado por el ser humano al noroeste de Colombia.
> Para ello, evaluamos las diferencias en la diversidad, estructura y
> composición de las comunidades de aves de los sistemas estudiados.
> Asimismo, analizamos la similitud entre los sistemas de acuerdo a la
> preferencia de hábitat de las especies registradas. Nuestros resultados
> muestran que los sistemas riparios juegan un papel fundamental en el
> paisaje antropogénico, ya que mantienen comunidades de aves diversas y
> complejas, alojan especies asociadas al interior de bosques y podrían estar
> favoreciendo la prevalencia de comunidades de aves heterogéneas en los
> sistemas adyacentes. Los potreros también exhibieron comunidades de aves
> heterogéneas, lo cual pudo deberse a la presencia de árboles altos, una
> alta cobertura arbustiva y la proximidad de los sistemas riparios. Pocas
> especies fueron sobre-dominantes en los campos de cultivo y las áreas
> urbanas puesto que estos sistemas presentan una estructura de la vegetación
> simple, lo cual propicia que las comunidades de aves sean homogéneas y
> dominadas por especies asociadas a sitios perturbados. Dado que
> mundialmente la creciente población humana depende de los ecosistemas
> agrícolas y urbanos, es imperante desarrollar actividades de manejo y
> conservación asociadas a este tipo de sistemas, de tal manera que sea
> posible conservar la vida silvestre y mejorar la calidad de vida del ser
> humano.
> 
> 
> 
> ACTA ZOOLOGICA MEXICANA
> 
> Full texts at: http://www1.inecol.edu.mx/azm/contenido-ok.htm
> 
> 
> 
> Acta Zoológica Mexicana (n. s.) Vol. 30, No. 1 (2014)
> 
> 
> 
> Lira-Torres, I., Briones-Salas, M., Gómez de Anda, F. R., Ojeda-Ramírez, D.
> & Peláez A., A. 2014. Uso y Aprovechamiento de Fauna Silvestre en la Selva
> Zoque, México. Acta Zoológica Mexicana (n.s.), 30(1): 74-90.
> 
> RESUMEN. La cacería de subsistencia y la pérdida de hábitat son dos de las
> principales actividadeshumanas que tienen un efecto negativo sobre la fauna
> silvestre en las fronteras de colonización. En la presente investigación se
> estudió el uso consuntivo que se da a la fauna silvestre en varias
> comunidades de la Selva Zoque, México. Durante el año 2012 y principios del
> 2013 se realizó una serie de visitas a la región para conocer y listar la
> riqueza de especies y usos que los habitantes hacen de ella, describir los
> métodos de caza más utilizados, las especies preferidas y su frecuencia y/o
> aprovechamiento. En total se cazaron 202 animales por 13 cazadores
> participantes, el grupo biológico más utilizado es el de los mamíferos, N 
= 

> 13 especies; las aves el segundo grupo, N = 4 especies y los reptiles el
> menos aprovechado, N = 1 especies. El aprovechamiento de esta última clase
> está orientado al uso alimenticio, y en menor grado, al artesanal, a
> diferencia de los otros dos grupos, que en su mayoría tienen uso
> alimentario, control, ornamental y medicinal. El total de biomasa obtenida
> durante el estudio fue de 1900 kg. La biomasa aprovechada varió
> significativamente entre especies (p > 0.001). La mayor producción de carne
> se obtuvo a partir de: Pecari tajacu, Cuniculus paca, Dasypus novemcinctus,
> Tapirus bairdii, Mazama temama y Tayassu pecari. La batida fue la técnica
> más usada, también se identificaron las técnicas de espía o acecho en
> sitios de alimentación, parcelas de trabajo y lampareo en áreas
> conservadas. Los tipos de armas más empleadas fueron las escopetas calibre
> 0.12, 0.16, 0.20 y rifle 0.22. La cacería de subsistencia es una actividad
> complementaria a las actividades agrícolas y ganaderas que las poblaciones
> campesinas realizan en la Selva Zoque; sin embargo, es necesario continuar
> realizando monitoreos para planear la sustentabilidad de ese recurso
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 
> López-Saut, E. G., Rodríguez-Estrella, R. & Chávez-Ramírez, F. 2014. 
¿Son 

> las grullas indicadoras de la riqueza de especies de aves acuáticas en
> humedales en el Altiplano Mexicano? Acta Zoológica Mexicana (n. s.), 30(2):
> 268-287.
> 
> Resumen. Los humedales son de los ecosistemas más productivos en el mundo y
> contienen una alta diversidad de especies. A pesar de esto, se encuentran
> amenazados por las actividades humanas que los modifican afectando su
> función hasta la desaparición de algunos de ellos, particularmente aquellos
> que se encuentran en zonas desérticas. Por lo anterior, es necesario
> generar herramientas que sean simples pero confiables para evaluar la
> calidad del humedal y su importancia para los grupos biológicos, con el fin
> de detectar tendencias y proponer medidas de conservación. Un ejemplo es
> utilizar bioindicadores que funcionen como indicadores de la riqueza de
> especies aves acuáticas. La Grulla gris (Grus canadensis) depende de los
> humedales en sus sitios invernales como refugio. Esta especie es
> considerada una especie bajo protección en México. El objetivo de este
> trabajo es analizar si puede ser un indicador de la riqueza de especies
> acuáticas para una evaluación rápida del humedal. Aunque no se encontró 
una 

> correlación entre la presencia de las grullas y la riqueza de especies de
> aves acuáticas, sí se encontraron diferencias en la composición de 
especies 

> y una mayor riqueza en los humedales donde están presentes las grullas. Los
> humedales no tuvieron similitud en la composición de especies, por lo que
> las grullas sirven de indicadoras para diferentes ensambles de aves
> acuáticas. Al hacer un análisis propuesto para identificar especies
> bioindicadoras, las grullas tienen un valor de 27.5 de un máximo de 32. Por
> lo anterior las grullas pueden ser una especie indicadora de la riqueza de
> especies acuáticas. Deben hacerse estudios a largo plazo y evaluar la
> relación de las abundancias de las grullas con las abundancias de las aves
> acuáticas para reforzar los resultados aquí presentados.
> 
> -- 
> 
> 
> Dr. Adolfo G. Navarro-Sigüenza
> Museo de Zoología
> Departamento de Biología Evolutiva
> Facultad de Ciencias
> Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
> Apartado Postal 70-399, México D. F. 04510, México
> Tel. (52-55) 56 22 54 35
> Fax. (52-55) 56 22 48 28
> E-mail: adolfon AT ciencias.unam.mx
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> Date:    Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:47:44 -0800
> From:    Eliot Miller 
> Subject: Re: cis & trans
> 
> For what it's worth, my personal opinion about these terms has always been
> that it's unnecessary jargon. It doesn't really make sense given their
> definitions in organic chemistry, and it's liable to confuse readers (it
> continues to confuse me). It seems like it could just as well mean
> "distributed on only one side of the Andes" vs. "both sides." East of
> Andes/West of Andes seem a lot clearer to me. If you're wondering from a
> historical perspective, the answer by Andres is great, and clears things up
> for me too--thanks! But if you're wondering about it because you're
> thinking about using it, I vote don't do it.
> 
> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 2:43 PM, Diego Calderón Franco <
> tocsdiegocalderon AT gmail.com> wrote:
> 
>> Andres,
>> as expected, you nailed it down!
>> gracias hermano,
>> d.
>> 
>> 
>> El 21/01/15 a las 17:22, Andres Cuervo escribió:
>> 
>> For Haffer, *cis-Andean* was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it was
>> more often the "Pacific/Chocó/Central American" side. Presumably, the
>> greater and more recent work of Haffer for lowland bird biogeography kind
>> of fixed the current usage of* cis-Andean* for referring to the territory
>> east of the range.
>> 
>> The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the
>> *generalization* that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the Andes
>> originated from Amazonia (Haffer's view point, perhaps)...
>> 
>> See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly this one
>> (and a quote):
>> 
>> Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of the
>> Andes. American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1:
>> <> America are designated in this paper as "trans-Andean" or "Pacific," and
>> those east of the Andes as "cis-Andean" or "Amazonian." Geographically
>> and historically (with respect to the evolution of the lowland bird
>> faunas) this usage seems preferable to that of Chapman (1917, 1926) who
>> sometimes referred to "cis-Andean" and "trans-Andean" in the opposite
>> sense>>
>> 
>> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Calderón Franco <
>> tocsdiegocalderon AT gmail.com> wrote:
>> 
>>> NEOORNERS,
>>> it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East of
>>> the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for those
>>> distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for example).
>>> Etymologically, CIS means "*on this side of*", while TRANS means "*across,
>>> on the far side, beyond*". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least
>>> ornithology as far as I know) we use those relative terms in such way...
>>> were they developed by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing
>>> the EAST (of the Andes) as the reference point?
>>> I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>>> thanks for your input,
>>> Diego.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> --
>>> Diego Calderon-Franco
>>> COLOMBIA Birding
>>> 
http://www.colombiabirding.comhttp://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiegohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 

>>> 
>>> 
>> 
>> --
>> Diego Calderon-Franco
>> COLOMBIA Birding
>> 
http://www.colombiabirding.comhttp://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiegohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 

>> 
>> 
> 
> ------------------------------
> 
> End of NEOORN-L Digest - 20 Jan 2015 to 21 Jan 2015 (#2015-19)
> **************************************************************
Subject: North Star Science & Technology Satellite Transmitter Grant Program (Deadline 13 Mar 2015)
From: George Wallace <gwallace AT ABCBIRDS.ORG>
Date: Thu, 26 Feb 2015 06:15:32 -0800
Please share with your colleagues, including folks in Europe, Asia, Africa, and 
Australasia: 


NORTH STAR SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY TRANSMITTER GRANT PROGRAM - North Star 
Science and Technology, LLC and American Bird Conservancy announce the 9th 
bi-annual North Star Science and Technology Transmitter Grant Program. In the 
spirit of giving back to the research community that they serve, North Star 
will award a total of eight (8) battery-powered or solar powered 
satellitetransmitters (Argos Platform Transmitter Terminals (PTTs), GPS or 
Doppler, to 1-3 recipients (8 PTTs to one project or 4 PTTs to each of two 
projects, or 4 to one, 2 to one, and 2 to another). PTTs are powerful, 
cutting-edge tools for the study of bird migration that greatly extend the 
range over which individual birds can be tracked. Research that contributes to 
our knowledge of avian biology and that provides data useful for bird 
conservation, particularly of threatened species, will receive preference in 
the selection process. American Bird Conservancy (http://www.abcbirds.org) will 
handle the proposal! 

 submission process, review proposals, and select the winning projects. Please 
seehttp://www.northstarst.com/grant-program/programm-announcement/ for more 
information andproposal guidelines. Deadline for proposals is March 13, 2015. 
Applications and any further questions about the program can be directed to 
George E. Wallace, American Bird Conservancy (EM:gwallace AT abcbirds.org; PH: 
540-253-5780; FX: 540-253-5782). 


George E. Wallace, PhD
Vice President, Oceans & Islands Division
American Bird Conservancy
4249 Loudoun Avenue
P.O. Box 249
The Plains, VA 20198 USA
Tel: 540-253-5780
Fax: 540-253-5782
E-mail:gwallace AT abcbirds.org
On the web at:www.abcbirds.org
Subject: Monk parakeet sampling
From: Grace Smith Vidaurre <gsmithvi AT NMSU.EDU>
Date: Sun, 22 Feb 2015 15:51:11 +0000
Hola,


Estoy explorando la posibilidad de colectar sangre para un estudio genmico de 
Myiopsitta monachus. Necesito ms muestras del rea nativo para este estudio y 
me gustara colectar en Uruguay y el norte de Argentina. Escrbenme si tienen 
informacin de sitios en esas regiones donde han visto muchas cotorras, o si 
van a estar en esas regiones este verano, quizs podramos hablar ms sobre 
trabajar juntos. 



Saludes,

Grace



Hi everyone,


I'm currently exploring the possibility of collecting blood for a genomic study 
of Myiopsitta monachus. I need more individuals from the native range, and I'd 
like to collect in northern Argentina and Uruguay. Does anyone have information 
about sites where monk parakeets have been frequently observed in those areas? 
Alternatively, if anyone is planning fieldwork around there this summer, 
perhaps we could talk further about joining forces. 



Best,

Grace


Grace Smith Vidaurre

PhD student

New Mexico State University
Subject: Fwd: Brazilian Journal of Ornithology - Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia
From: Marcos Persio <persio.marcos AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 19:32:34 -0800
Hi all,



The latest issue of the Brazilian Journal of Ornithlogy

Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia - RBO - Volume 22 (4) December 2014


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/issue/current/showToc 








EXPERIMENTAL TRANSLOCATIONS: PITFALLS AND ALTERNATIVES FOR QUANTIFYING
ANIMAL MOVEMENT IN FRAGMENTED LANDSCAPES

*Luke Losada Powell, Philip C. Stouffer*
ABSTRACT

As anthropogenic change continues to fragment terrestrial habitats,
conservation biologists are increasingly concerned with how wild animals
move through fragmented landscapes. Experimental translocations have
recently gained popularity as a technique to determine landscape
permeability by wild animals in fragmented landscapes. In experimental
translocations, researchers capture individuals — usually adults — and
release them elsewhere in order to determine whether they are able to cross
the landscape and return to their original location. We argue that most
experimental translocations have two inherent confounding factors — age of
the individual and homing ability — and that the narrow spatiotemporal
scale of the technique may give it limited ability to address the most
important conservation and management questions in fragmented landscapes.
We discuss three alternative techniques (telemetry, capture-mark-recapture,
and landscape genetics), and recommend that experimental translocations
only be undertaken if: 1) they avoid confounding factors; 2) they are
validated by other techniques; and 3) no other options are available for
obtaining the data. We stress that researchers that do proceed with
experimental translocations must acknowledge that they are using an
indirect proxy to quantify natural animal movement.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1030/pdf_868 



#################################################################################################### 

BREEDING BIOLOGY OF THE WHITE-COLLARED SWIFT STREPTOPROCNE ZONARIS IN
SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL

*Renata Neves Biancalana*
ABSTRACT

White-collared Swifts Streptoprocne zonaris are common throughout the
tropical Americas. They usually breed in colonies in wet caves and next to
waterfalls. Despite their widespread range, little is known about their
breeding biology. Here I present data gathered from 2012 to 2014 at two
breeding sites, Luminosa Cave and Água Comprida waterfall, located within
Intervales State Park, in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. More than 30
nests were found in the cave and one behind a waterfall. The egg-laying
period began in late October and lasted until the first week of November.
Nests were made mostly of bryophytes, with some fresh and dry leaves and
sand. Eggs were dull white, and had an oval shape. Nestlings per nest
varied from 1 to 3. The fledging period was between 41-51 days. This is the
first record for this species of a successful nest with 3 nestlings. The
species showed high nest site fidelity. Plumage development was similar to
other species in the genus.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1048/pdf_881 



################################################################################################## 

RODENT PREDATION BY TURDUS LEUCOMELAS VIEILLOT, 1818 (PASSERIFORMES:
TURDIDAE)

*Pedro de Oliveira Mafia, Matheus Rocha Jorge Corrêa, Antônio Jorge do
Rosário Cruz, Cristiano Schetini de Azevedo*
ABSTRACT

Pale-breasted Thrush (Turdus leucomelas) is described as an omnivorous bird
that forage solitarily or in pairs on the soil. This note reports a rodent
predation event by T. leucomelas. The event was recorded on November 14th
2013, in a riparian Forest fragment of Grande River, in Igarapava
Municipality, São Paulo, Brazil. Although the presence of small
vertebrates on the diet of T. leucomelas is known, this is the first record
of a mammal being predated by this bird species. This record is important
because it contributes to a better understand of the natural history of
Neotropical passerines.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1044/pdf_886 





############################################################################################### 

CRESTED QUETZAL (PHAROMACHRUS ANTISIANUS) PREYING ON A GLASSFROG (ANURA,
CENTROLENIDAE) IN SIERRA DE PERIJÁ, NORTHWESTERN VENEZUELA

*Marcial Ramón Quiroga-Carmona*
ABSTRACT

We report the predation of a glassfrog (Hyalinobatrachium pallidum) by a
Crested Quetzal (Pharomachrus antisianus). The record was made in a
locality in the Sierra de Perijá, near to the northern part of the border
between Colombia and Venezuela, and consisted in observinga male P.
antisianus vocalizing with a glassfrog in its bill. The vocalizations were
answered by a female, which approached the male, took the frog with its
bill and carried it into a cavity built on a landslide. Subsequent to this,
the male remained near to the cavity until the female left it and together
they abandoned this place. Based on the behavior observed in the couple of
quetzals, and what has previously been described that this group of birds
gives their young a diet rich in animal protein comprised of arthropods and
small vertebrates, we believe that the couple was raising a brood at the
time when the observation was carried out.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1043/pdf_889 



################################################################################################### 

AN AVIFAUNAL INVENTORY AND CONSERVATION PROSPECTS FOR THE GURUPI BIOLOGICAL
RESERVE, MARANHÃO, BRAZIL

*Diego Mendes Lima, Carlos Martínez, Daniel Santana Lorenzo Raíces*
ABSTRACT

We carried out an avifaunal inventory of the Gurupi Biological Reserve,
Maranhão, municipalities of Bom Jardim and Centro Novo do Maranhão,
between December 2009 and December 2013. The main objective was to estimate
species richness and identify endemic species. A further objective was to
identify vulnerable and endangered species to provide information for the
development of conservation strategies. Data were collected using
mist-netting and MacKinnon lists, as well as nonsystematic observations. A
total of 424 species were recorded from 64 families; 18 of which considered
endemic taxa. Seven are threatened nationally: Psophia obscura, Guaruba
guarouba, Pyrrhura lepida lepida, Pteroglossus bitorquatus bitorquatus,
Phlegopsis nigromaculata paraensis, Dendrocincla merula badia, and
Dendrocolaptes medius. In addition to these, another eight are threatened
internationally (IUCN 2014): Tinamus tao, Penelope pileata, Lophornis
gouldii, Pyrrhura amazonum, Touit huetii, Pionites leucogaster, Pyrilia
vulturina and Lepidothrix iris. Survey results underscore the extreme
importance of the Gurupi Biological Reserve as a strategic site for the
conservation and maintenance of endemic and endangered species of the
Belém Center of Endemism in Brazilian Amazonia.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1037/pdf_880 



#################################################################################################### 

CORE AND TRANSIENT SPECIES IN AN AMAZONIAN SAVANNA BIRD ASSEMBLAGE

*Roberta Lúcia Boss, José Maria Cardoso da Silva*
ABSTRACT

In this paper, we report the number of core and transient bird species in
an Amazonian savanna site and assess their ecological differences. We
conducted our study at Campo Experimental do Cerrado (CEC) da
Embrapa–Amapá, 48 km north of Macapá (0 ̊2'5" N / 51 ̊2'2" W), Amapá,
Brazil. Forty points were monitored on a monthly basis over the course of
one year, using the unlimited-distance point counts in a plot of 360
hectares of well-preserved and relatively homogeneous upland savanna from
September 2006 to August 2007. Species were classified in core (recorded in
the area in nine or more months), transient (recorded in the area in four
or less months) and intermediate (the ones recorded between five and eight
months). Species were also classified according to feeding guilds and
habitat preferences. Statistical analyses were made to compare core and
transient species. We recorded 72 species in the plot, of which 36 were
transients, 12 were intermediates, and 22 were core. Core species have
higher abundances than transient species. Core species are found mostly in
the savanna while transient species also occur in other habitats within the
landscape. Both core and transient groups presented well-marked seasonal
variation in abundance. Recruitment explains abundance variation for core
species, while differences in the availability of food resources in the
site explains variation of the abundance in transient species. We predict
that plot-level (not more than 500 hectares) bird assemblages in South
American savannas will be composed of a small number of abundant and
habitat-restricted species that occupy the site almost year round, combined
with a high number of low abundant transient species that are habitat
generalists and use the plot only during limited periods of their annual
life cycle.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1121/pdf_884 



################################################################################################### 

RIVERS ACTING AS BARRIERS FOR BIRD DISPERSAL IN THE AMAZON

*Alexandre Fernandes, Mario Cohn-Haft, Tomas Hrbek, Izeni Farias*
ABSTRACT

Morphological, vocal and genetic studies have shown that the Madeira River
and its right bank tributaries delimit populations of primates and birds.
We sequenced the cytochrome b gene (approx. 950 bp) for individuals of
three suboscine passerine bird species, Glyphorynchus spirurus
(Furnariidae), Willisornis poecilinotus (Thamnophilidae) and Schiffornis
turdina (Tityridae), on opposite banks of the Madeira River and two of its
right-bank tributaries, the Aripuanã and Jiparaná rivers. Phylogenetic
hypotheses (parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis) revealed
clades that have over 3.1% genetic differentiation on opposite banks of the
Madeira River for G. spirurus, W. poecilinotus and S. turdina, suggesting
that this river restricts gene flow among populations of these three
species. The Jiparaná and Aripuanã rivers apparently separate distinct
populations of G. spirurus, the smallest species we examined, but not those
of the other two heavier bodied species, W. poecilinotus and S. turdina. In
G. spirurus four clades with high levels of genetic differentiation
(3.2–5.5%) were found to be delimited by the three rivers evaluated,
whereas in W. poecilinotus and S. turdina no genetic structure across the
Jiparaná and Aripuanã rivers was detected. In general, birds that are
known to show population structure across the Madeira tributaries
(Glyphorynchus spirurus, Hemitriccus minor, Hypocnemis rondoni,
Herpsilochmus stotzi, and Hylophylax naevius) have body masses smaller than
those of both Willisornis poecilinotus and Schiffornis turdina, but some
exceptions are discussed. Future studies controlling for several variables
are necessary to determine the extent to which body mass is a useful
predictor of genetic population structure in understory suboscine passerines


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1034/pdf_883 



################################################################################################### 

A CERRADO BIRD COMMUNITY IN THE NORTHERNMOST PORTION OF NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL
- RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CONSERVATION

*Mauro Pichorim, Marcelo da Silva, Bruno Rodrigo de Albuquerque França,
Tonny Marques de Oliveira-Júnior, Marcelo Câmara Rodrigues*
ABSTRACT

he Cerrado is the largest savanna in South America and it is rich in fauna
and flora and considered a biodiversity hotspot. Its contact with the
surrounding Amazon, Atlantic Forest and Caatinga is irregular, forming
large diffuse ecotones in some regions and disjointed patches in others.
The Cerrado patches located in the Amazon are relatively studied, but
little is known about those in the Atlantic Forest and Caatinga. This
article presents information on the composition of a bird community in a
savanna formation on the coast of the northernmost portion of northeast
Brazil (5o23'25"S / 35o30'25"W). This site was visited 17 times between
October 2006 and August 2013. The total richness was 87 species distributed
into 32 families. The following Cerrado endemics were recorded:
Charitospiza eucosma and Porphyrospiza caerulescens. Other species recorded
associated mainly with the Cerrado biome were Heliactin bilophus, Cypsnagra
hirundinacea and Coryphaspiza melanotis. Some vulnerable and near
threatened species were also recorded for the first time in the
northernmost portion of northeastern Brazil, with some of these more than
1,000 km from their previously known localities. The results broaden the
knowledge on the distribution of various species, in addition to providing
information on seasonality and reproduction of others and revealing an
overall lack of information on the composition of avian communities in
little studied areas of Brazil.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1082/pdf_882 



#################################################################################################### 

CONTINUED BIRD SURVEYS IN SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL BRAZILIAN ATLANTIC FORESTS
AND THE IMPORTANCE OF CONSERVING ELEVATIONAL GRADIENTS

*Vagner Cavarzere, Thiago Vernaschi Vieira da Costa, Giulyana Althmann
Benedicto, Luciano Moreira-Lima, Luís Fábio Silveira*
ABSTRACT

Although the Atlantic forest is the best-studied Brazilian phytogeographic
domain, few coastal municipalities of the state of São Paulo can count on
published and critically revised bird species list, which are important
initial steps to organize conservation inniciatives. Here we present
historical records from Bertioga, a northern coastline municipality of the
state of São Paulo, as well as recent records obtained in surveys during
the past years within the municipality. Surveying methods, carried out
between 2008-2011, included point counts, 10-species lists, transect counts
and mist nets. This compendium resulted in 330 documented species, 90 of
which still await documentation. Of these 420 bird species, 85 (20.4%) are
Atlantic forest endemic species and as many as eight, six and 23 are
threatened at the global, national and state levels, respectively.
Seventeen species are reported from Bertioga for the first time. Some
records based exclusively on sightings must be carefully considered,
whereas the species richness reflects the diversity of the habitats we
visited, which varied from lowland and montane forests, to slopes and
fluvial and tidal-influenced environments. We highlight that every habitat
of the region should be continuously inventoried and that the absence of
legal protection of lowland forests (which are not considered under the
elevational threshold of the Serra do Mar State Park) must be reevaluated,
as they harbor a greater number of endemic and threatened species than do
other elevational bands.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1065/pdf_885 



################################################################################################ 

LONG-TRAINED NIGHTJAR (MACROPSALIS FORCIPATA) (AVES, CAPRIMULGIDAE): FIRST
PARAGUAYAN RECORD

*Hans Hostettler, Paul Smith*
ABSTRACT

Abstract: The first observations of Long-trained Nightjar *Macropsalis
forcipata* in Paraguay are documented, confirming speculation that the
species was likely to occur in the country.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1076/pdf_887 



################################################################################################# 

FIRST RECORDS OF MASKED TITYRA TITYRA SEMIFASCIATA (SPIX, 1825) FOR THE
STATE OF PARANÁ, SOUTHERN BRAZIL

*Fabiane Girardi, Eduardo Carrano*
ABSTRACT

We report the first records of the Masked Tityra (Tityra semifasciata) for
the state of Paraná, in the city of Foz do Iguaçu, between July and
September 2014. These records extend the known distribution range of the
species and establish a new southern limit for its geographic distribution
within Brazil. Although the species occur in nearby regions, it had never
been recorded before in southern Brazil, possibly due to confusion with the
congeneric Black-tailed Tityra (Tityra cayana).


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1066/pdf_888 


###################################

Dr. Marcos Pérsio Dantas Santos

Laboratório de Ecologia e Zoologia de  Vertebrados - Ornitologia
Instituto de Ciências Biológicas
Universidade Federal do Pará
Rua Augusto Corrêa, 01 - Guamá. CEP 66075-110. Caixa postal 479.
Tel.: Sala UFPA - +55 91 3201-8664. Belém - Pará - Brasil

skype: marcos.persio
Subject: Re: pdf request: Chebez et al. (2008)
From: Carlos Daniel Cadena Ordoñez <ccadena AT UNIANDES.EDU.CO>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 23:04:12 +0000
sent.

> On Feb 19, 2015, at 7:15 AM, Guy Kirwan 
<000000954d954c51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU> wrote: 

> 
> Does someone have a .pdf copy of Chebez, J.C., R. Castillo, R. Guller & L. 
Castillo (2008) Sobre la situacion taxonomica de Amazilia brevirostris (Lesson, 
1829) y su presencia en la Argentina. Las Ciencias Revista de la Universidad de 
Maimonides1: 67-81 that they could send me, please? 

> 
> I thought I had it already, but can't seem to locate a copy.
> 
> Thanks.
> 
>  Guy M. Kirwan
> 74 Waddington Street, Norwich NR2 4JS, UK. E-mail: gmkirwan AT aol.com

--
Carlos Daniel Cadena
Director
Departamento de Ciencias Biológicas
Universidad de los Andes
Bogotá, Colombia

Tel: (57-1) 3394949 Ext. 2072
ccadena AT uniandes.edu.co
http://evolvert.uniandes.edu.co
Subject: Re: pdf request: Chebez et al. (2008) [SENT]
From: Nacho Areta <esporofila AT YAHOO.COM.AR>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 21:30:03 +0000
 JUAN IGNACIO ARETA 
IBIGEO-CONICET
Mendoza 2  
Salta (4400) 
Salta, Argentina
      De: Guy Kirwan <000000954d954c51-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
 Para: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
 Enviado: Jueves, 19 de febrero, 2015 9:15:04
 Asunto: [NEOORN-L] pdf request: Chebez et al. (2008)
   
 Does someone have a .pdf copy of Chebez, J.C., R. Castillo, R. Guller & L. 
Castillo (2008) Sobre la situacion taxonomica de Amazilia brevirostris (Lesson, 
1829) y su presencia en la Argentina. Las Ciencias Revista de la Universidad de 
Maimonides1: 67-81 that they could send me, please? 


I thought I had it already, but can't seem to locate a copy.

Thanks.
 
 Guy M. Kirwan74 Waddington Street, Norwich NR2 4JS, UK. 
E-mail: gmkirwan AT aol.com 



  
Subject: NEOLIT: Historia Natural (tercera serie), 4 (1)
From: Santiago Claramunt <sclaramunt.uy AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 13:20:22 -0500
The papers about birds in the latest issue:
They can be downloaded at:
http://fundacionazara.org.ar/revista-historia-natural.html

Saludos

Santiago

 
> Smith, Paul 2014. Natural history observations on the poorly-studied 
quebracho crested tinamou Eudromia formosa (Aves, Tinamiformes, Tinamidae). 
Historia Natural (tercera serie), 4 (1): 39-44. 

>  
> Escobar-Lasso, Sergio, and Jos F. Martnez 2014. Descripcin del 
comportamiento de anidacin de la esmeralda andina Amazilia franciae 
(Apodiformes, Trochilidae) en la regin andina de Colombia. Historia Natural 
(tercera serie), 4 (1): 45-54. 

>  
> Heredia, Jos, and Sergio A. Salvador 2014. Comportamiento ecolgico y primer 
descripcin del nido del araero corona rojiza (Myioborus brunniceps) en el 
Centro de Argentina. Historia Natural (tercera serie), 4 (1): 55-62. 

>  
Subject: Re: pdf request
From: "Gorton, Gregg" <Gregg.Gorton AT VA.GOV>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 12:21:55 -0500
I suggest checking with John Arvin, the former editor of that journal. HE may 
have some in his basement… ☺ 


John: Jarvin AT gcbo.org (at Gulf Coast Bird Observatory) 


Best to all,,

Gregg Gorton
Narberth, PA
Homoaves [at] gmail.com

From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Travis Rosenberry 

Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2015 11:05 AM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [EXTERNAL] Re: [NEOORN-L] pdf request

I checked in our holdings and our run of the Mexican Birds Newsletter is very 
limited and does not include this article. We do have a few Euphonia. Send me a 
private message if we can offer more help with this. 


Travis Rosenberry- Library Director
The Peregrine Fund
Research Library
5668 W. Flying Hawk Ln.
Boise, ID 83709 USA
TRosenberry AT peregrinefund.org
www.peregrinefund.org

From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jack Eitniear 

Sent: Wednesday, February 18, 2015 6:28 PM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] pdf request

Seems I recall the Peregrine Fund library has this along with a few issues of 
the journal Euphonia produced around the same time period. 

Jack Eitniear

Editor/Texas Ornithological Society Publications
www.texasbirds.org
Membership Secretary/Neotropical Ornithological Society
www.neotropicalornithology.org
Director/Center for the Study of Tropical Birds, Inc
www.cstbinc.org
Research papers: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jack_Eitniear?ev=hdr_xprf 


On Wed, Feb 18, 2015 at 7:19 PM, Rafael Rueda Hernández 
> wrote: 

Hi all,

I am having trouble finding the following paper:

Clow, B. 1976. A new look at the San Blas area. Mexican
Birds Newsletter 1(2):12-15.

If you could help me get my paws on a PDF version of it, i'd really appreciate 
it. 


Saludos

Rafael Rueda Hernández

Subject: Re: pdf request
From: Travis Rosenberry <TRosenberry AT PEREGRINEFUND.ORG>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 16:05:15 +0000
I checked in our holdings and our run of the Mexican Birds Newsletter is very 
limited and does not include this article. We do have a few Euphonia. Send me a 
private message if we can offer more help with this. 


Travis Rosenberry- Library Director
The Peregrine Fund
Research Library
5668 W. Flying Hawk Ln.
Boise, ID 83709 USA
TRosenberry AT peregrinefund.org
www.peregrinefund.org

From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jack Eitniear 

Sent: Wednesday, February 18, 2015 6:28 PM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] pdf request

Seems I recall the Peregrine Fund library has this along with a few issues of 
the journal Euphonia produced around the same time period. 

Jack Eitniear

Editor/Texas Ornithological Society Publications
www.texasbirds.org
Membership Secretary/Neotropical Ornithological Society
www.neotropicalornithology.org
Director/Center for the Study of Tropical Birds, Inc
www.cstbinc.org
Research papers: https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jack_Eitniear?ev=hdr_xprf 


On Wed, Feb 18, 2015 at 7:19 PM, Rafael Rueda Hernández 
> wrote: 

Hi all,

I am having trouble finding the following paper:

Clow, B. 1976. A new look at the San Blas area. Mexican
Birds Newsletter 1(2):12-15.

If you could help me get my paws on a PDF version of it, i'd really appreciate 
it. 


Saludos

Rafael Rueda Hernández

Subject: Re: Royal Flycatcher paper
From: Mauro Guimarães Diniz <mauro.diniz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 11:15:37 -0200
hi all

you may also try mark.whittingham AT zoo.ox.ac.uk.
this is the author direction in the paper I've got.

best

Mauro

2015-02-19 11:08 GMT-02:00 Stuart Marsden :

> Hi,
>
> I think the M.J. Whittingham is Mark Whittingham who is at Newcastle
> University - mark.whittingham AT ncl.ac.uk
>
> Cheers
>
> Dr Stuart J Marsden
> Reader in Conservation Ecology
> Division of Biology & Conservation Ecology
> School of Science & the Environment
> Manchester Metropolitan University
> Chester Street
> Manchester M1 5GD, UK.
> tel: ++44 (0)161 247 6215
>
> Research blog at http://stuartmarsden.blogspot.co.uk/
>
> Office hours: Monday 10-12am; Friday 2-3 pm
>
> Before acting on this email or opening any attachments you
> should read the Manchester Metropolitan University's email
> disclaimer available on its website
> http://www.mmu.ac.uk/emaildisclaimer
>
> -----Original Message-----
> From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds
> [mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Brad Jacobs
> Sent: 19 February 2015 12:55
> To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] Royal Flycatcher paper
>
> This may lead closer to the authors?
>
> Whittingham, M. J. and Williams, R. S. R. (2000) Notes on morphological
> differences exhibited by Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus taxa.
> Cotinga 13: 14-16.
>
> Brad
>
> Brad Jacobs
> Missouri Department of Conservation
> P.O.Box 180
> Jefferson City, MO 65102
> 573-751-4115  ext 3648
> ________________________________________
> From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds [
> NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of Mauro Guimarães Diniz [
> mauro.diniz AT GMAIL.COM]
> Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2015 4:23 AM
> To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
> Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] Royal Flycatcher paper
>
> sent
>
> 2015-02-18 22:18 GMT-02:00 Ragupathy Kannan  >:
> Hi all, two of my undergrad students and I are working on the Royal
> Flycatcher monograph for the neotropical ornithology website.  We found a
> full pdf of the following article via google scholar, but it does not
> indicate where and when it was published.  In fact it looks like just an
> unpublished manuscript.  We cannot get in touch with the authors.  Can
> anyone help shed more light on this?  Thanks,
>
> Preliminary findings on morphological differences between five subspecies
> of Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus, by By M. J. Whittingham &
> R.S.R. Williams. The first author has an Oxford affiliation.
>
> R. Kannan
> Professor of Biology
> University of Arkansas--Fort Smith
>
>
>
>
> --
> Mauro Guimarães Diniz[
> 
http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRdHWiIiUDno3GTH1WjRUtyfbk0eMmoczzQnB1KVhrpCzgmEvITxQ 

> ]
> +55 31 9956.4831
> Endereço skipe: mauro.diniz.fauna.ibamamg
> http://lattes.cnpq.br/0061976429573672
>
>
> "Amar é a gente querer se abraçar com um pássaro que voa"
> João Guimarães Rosa, em Do Diário em Paris (Ave, Palavra).
>
> Antes de imprimir esta mensagem pense na sua responsabilidade com o meio
> ambiente.
>
> AVISO
> Esta mensagem é destinada exclusivamente à(s) pessoa(s) indicada(s) como
> destinatário(s), podendo conter informações confidenciais, protegidas por
> lei.
>  A transmissão incorreta da mensagem não acarreta a perda de sua
> confidencialidade.
> Caso esta mensagem tenha sido recebida por engano, solicitamos que seja
> devolvida ao remetente e apagada imediatamente de seu sistema.
> É vedado a qualquer pessoa que não seja destinatário usar, revelar,
> distribuir ou copiar, ainda que parcialmente, esta mensagem.
> Obrigado
>
> 
------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

> DISCLAIMER
> This message is destined exclusively to the intended receiver.
> It may contain confidential or legally protected information.
> The incorrect transmission of this message does not mean loss of its
> confidentiality.
> If this message is received by mistake, please send it back to the sender
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> the Manchester Metropolitan University email disclaimer available on its
> website http://www.mmu.ac.uk/emaildisclaimer "
>



-- 
*Mauro Guimarães Diniz *
+55 31 9956.4831
Endereço skipe: mauro.diniz.fauna.ibamamg
http://lattes.cnpq.br/0061976429573672


*“Amar é a gente querer se abraçar com um pássaro que voa”*
*João Guimarães Rosa, em Do Diário em Paris (Ave, Palavra).*

Antes de imprimir esta mensagem pense na sua responsabilidade com o meio
ambiente.

AVISO
Esta mensagem é destinada exclusivamente à(s) pessoa(s) indicada(s) como
destinatário(s),
podendo conter informações confidenciais, protegidas por lei.
 A transmissão incorreta da mensagem não acarreta a perda de sua
confidencialidade.
Caso esta mensagem tenha sido recebida por engano, solicitamos que seja
devolvida ao remetente e apagada imediatamente de seu sistema.
É vedado a qualquer pessoa que não seja destinatário usar, revelar,
distribuir ou copiar, ainda que parcialmente, esta mensagem.
Obrigado

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

DISCLAIMER
This message is destined exclusively to the intended receiver.
It may contain confidential or legally protected information.
The incorrect transmission of this message does not mean loss of its
confidentiality.
If this message is received by mistake, please send it back to the sender
and delete it from your system immediately.
It is forbidden to any person who is not the intended receiver to use,
reveal, distribute, or copy any part of this message.
Thank you
Subject: Re: Royal Flycatcher paper
From: Stuart Marsden <S.Marsden AT MMU.AC.UK>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 13:08:40 +0000
Hi,

I think the M.J. Whittingham is Mark Whittingham who is at Newcastle University 
- mark.whittingham AT ncl.ac.uk 


Cheers

Dr Stuart J Marsden
Reader in Conservation Ecology
Division of Biology & Conservation Ecology
School of Science & the Environment
Manchester Metropolitan University
Chester Street
Manchester M1 5GD, UK.
tel: ++44 (0)161 247 6215

Research blog at http://stuartmarsden.blogspot.co.uk/

Office hours: Monday 10-12am; Friday 2-3 pm

Before acting on this email or opening any attachments you
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-----Original Message-----
From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Brad Jacobs 

Sent: 19 February 2015 12:55
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] Royal Flycatcher paper

This may lead closer to the authors?

Whittingham, M. J. and Williams, R. S. R. (2000) Notes on morphological 
differences exhibited by Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus taxa. Cotinga 
13: 14-16. 


Brad

Brad Jacobs
Missouri Department of Conservation
P.O.Box 180
Jefferson City, MO 65102
573-751-4115  ext 3648
________________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of Mauro Guimares Diniz 
[mauro.diniz AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2015 4:23 AM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] Royal Flycatcher paper

sent

2015-02-18 22:18 GMT-02:00 Ragupathy Kannan 
>: 

Hi all, two of my undergrad students and I are working on the Royal Flycatcher 
monograph for the neotropical ornithology website. We found a full pdf of the 
following article via google scholar, but it does not indicate where and when 
it was published. In fact it looks like just an unpublished manuscript. We 
cannot get in touch with the authors. Can anyone help shed more light on this? 
Thanks, 


Preliminary findings on morphological differences between five subspecies of 
Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus, by By M. J. Whittingham & R.S.R. 
Williams. The first author has an Oxford affiliation. 


R. Kannan
Professor of Biology
University of Arkansas--Fort Smith




--
Mauro Guimares 
Diniz[http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRdHWiIiUDno3GTH1WjRUtyfbk0eMmoczzQnB1KVhrpCzgmEvITxQ] 

+55 31 9956.4831
Endereo skipe: mauro.diniz.fauna.ibamamg
http://lattes.cnpq.br/0061976429573672


"Amar  a gente querer se abraar com um pssaro que voa"
Joo Guimares Rosa, em Do Dirio em Paris (Ave, Palavra).

Antes de imprimir esta mensagem pense na sua responsabilidade com o meio 
ambiente. 


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Obrigado

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

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Subject: Re: Royal Flycatcher paper
From: Brad Jacobs <Brad.Jacobs AT MDC.MO.GOV>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 12:55:17 +0000
This may lead closer to the authors?

Whittingham, M. J. and Williams, R. S. R. (2000) Notes on morphological 
differences exhibited by Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus taxa. Cotinga 
13: 14-16. 


Brad

Brad Jacobs
Missouri Department of Conservation
P.O.Box 180
Jefferson City, MO 65102
573-751-4115  ext 3648
________________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of Mauro Guimares Diniz 
[mauro.diniz AT GMAIL.COM] 

Sent: Thursday, February 19, 2015 4:23 AM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] Royal Flycatcher paper

sent

2015-02-18 22:18 GMT-02:00 Ragupathy Kannan 
>: 

Hi all, two of my undergrad students and I are working on the Royal Flycatcher 
monograph for the neotropical ornithology website. We found a full pdf of the 
following article via google scholar, but it does not indicate where and when 
it was published. In fact it looks like just an unpublished manuscript. We 
cannot get in touch with the authors. Can anyone help shed more light on this? 
Thanks, 


Preliminary findings on morphological differences between five subspecies of 
Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus, by By M. J. Whittingham & R.S.R. 
Williams. The first author has an Oxford affiliation. 


R. Kannan
Professor of Biology
University of Arkansas--Fort Smith




--
Mauro Guimares 
Diniz[http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRdHWiIiUDno3GTH1WjRUtyfbk0eMmoczzQnB1KVhrpCzgmEvITxQ] 

+55 31 9956.4831
Endereo skipe: mauro.diniz.fauna.ibamamg
http://lattes.cnpq.br/0061976429573672


Amar  a gente querer se abraar com um pssaro que voa
Joo Guimares Rosa, em Do Dirio em Paris (Ave, Palavra).

Antes de imprimir esta mensagem pense na sua responsabilidade com o meio 
ambiente. 


AVISO
Esta mensagem  destinada exclusivamente (s) pessoa(s) indicada(s) como 
destinatrio(s), 

podendo conter informaes confidenciais, protegidas por lei.
 A transmisso incorreta da mensagem no acarreta a perda de sua 
confidencialidade. 

Caso esta mensagem tenha sido recebida por engano, solicitamos que seja 
devolvida ao remetente e apagada imediatamente de seu sistema. 

 vedado a qualquer pessoa que no seja destinatrio usar, revelar, distribuir 
ou copiar, ainda que parcialmente, esta mensagem. 

Obrigado

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

DISCLAIMER
This message is destined exclusively to the intended receiver.
It may contain confidential or legally protected information.
The incorrect transmission of this message does not mean loss of its 
confidentiality. 

If this message is received by mistake, please send it back to the sender and 
delete it from your system immediately. 

It is forbidden to any person who is not the intended receiver to use, reveal, 
distribute, or copy any part of this message. 

Thank you
Subject: Re: Royal Flycatcher paper
From: Mauro Guimarães Diniz <mauro.diniz AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 08:23:33 -0200
sent

2015-02-18 22:18 GMT-02:00 Ragupathy Kannan :

> Hi all, two of my undergrad students and I are working on the Royal
> Flycatcher monograph for the neotropical ornithology website.  We found a
> full pdf of the following article via google scholar, but it does not
> indicate where and when it was published.  In fact it looks like just an
> unpublished manuscript.  We cannot get in touch with the authors.  Can
> anyone help shed more light on this?  Thanks,
>
> Preliminary findings on morphological differences between five subspecies
> of Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus, by By M. J. Whittingham &
> R.S.R. Williams. The first author has an Oxford affiliation.
>
> R. Kannan
> Professor of Biology
> University of Arkansas--Fort Smith
>
>


-- 
*Mauro Guimarães Diniz *
+55 31 9956.4831
Endereço skipe: mauro.diniz.fauna.ibamamg
http://lattes.cnpq.br/0061976429573672


*“Amar é a gente querer se abraçar com um pássaro que voa”*
*João Guimarães Rosa, em Do Diário em Paris (Ave, Palavra).*

Antes de imprimir esta mensagem pense na sua responsabilidade com o meio
ambiente.

AVISO
Esta mensagem é destinada exclusivamente à(s) pessoa(s) indicada(s) como
destinatário(s),
podendo conter informações confidenciais, protegidas por lei.
 A transmissão incorreta da mensagem não acarreta a perda de sua
confidencialidade.
Caso esta mensagem tenha sido recebida por engano, solicitamos que seja
devolvida ao remetente e apagada imediatamente de seu sistema.
É vedado a qualquer pessoa que não seja destinatário usar, revelar,
distribuir ou copiar, ainda que parcialmente, esta mensagem.
Obrigado

------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ 

DISCLAIMER
This message is destined exclusively to the intended receiver.
It may contain confidential or legally protected information.
The incorrect transmission of this message does not mean loss of its
confidentiality.
If this message is received by mistake, please send it back to the sender
and delete it from your system immediately.
It is forbidden to any person who is not the intended receiver to use,
reveal, distribute, or copy any part of this message.
Thank you
Subject: Re: pdf request
From: Jack Eitniear <jclintoneitniear AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2015 19:28:20 -0600
Seems I recall the Peregrine Fund library has this along with a few issues
of the journal Euphonia produced around the same time period.
Jack Eitniear

Editor/Texas Ornithological Society Publications
www.texasbirds.org
Membership Secretary/Neotropical Ornithological Society
www.neotropicalornithology.org
Director/Center for the Study of Tropical Birds, Inc
www.cstbinc.org
Research papers:
https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Jack_Eitniear?ev=hdr_xprf

On Wed, Feb 18, 2015 at 7:19 PM, Rafael Rueda Hernández 
wrote:

> Hi all,
>
> I am having trouble finding the following paper:
>
> Clow, B. 1976. A new look at the San Blas area. Mexican
> Birds Newsletter 1(2):12-15.
>
> If you could help me get my paws on a PDF version of it, i'd really
> appreciate it.
>
> Saludos
>
> Rafael Rueda Hernández
>
Subject: pdf request
From: Rafael Rueda Hernndez <rarh82 AT HOTMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2015 19:19:40 -0600
Hi all,

I am having trouble finding the following paper:

Clow, B. 1976. A new look at the San Blas area. Mexican
Birds Newsletter 1(2):12-15.

If you could help me get my paws on a PDF version of it, i'd really appreciate 
it. 


Saludos

Rafael Rueda Hernndez 		 	   		  
Subject: Re: Royal Flycatcher paper
From: Brad Jacobs <Brad.Jacobs AT MDC.MO.GOV>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 00:46:54 +0000
Whittingham, M. J. and Williams, R. S. R. (2000) Notes on morphological 
differences exhibited by Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus taxa. Cotinga 
13: 14-16. 


Brad Jacobs
Missouri Department of Conservation
P.O.Box 180
Jefferson City, MO 65102
573-751-4115  ext 3648
________________________________________
From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] on behalf of Ragupathy Kannan 
[greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN] 

Sent: Wednesday, February 18, 2015 6:18 PM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: [NEOORN-L] Royal Flycatcher paper

Hi all, two of my undergrad students and I are working on the Royal Flycatcher 
monograph for the neotropical ornithology website. We found a full pdf of the 
following article via google scholar, but it does not indicate where and when 
it was published. In fact it looks like just an unpublished manuscript. We 
cannot get in touch with the authors. Can anyone help shed more light on this? 
Thanks, 


Preliminary findings on morphological differences between five subspecies of 
Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus, by By M. J. Whittingham & R.S.R. 
Williams. The first author has an Oxford affiliation. 


R. Kannan
Professor of Biology
University of Arkansas--Fort Smith
Subject: Royal Flycatcher paper
From: Ragupathy Kannan <greathornbill AT YAHOO.CO.IN>
Date: Thu, 19 Feb 2015 00:18:38 +0000
Hi all, two of my undergrad students and I are working on the Royal Flycatcher 
monograph for the neotropical ornithology website.  We found a full pdf of the 
following article via google scholar, but it does not indicate where and when 
it was published.  In fact it looks like just an unpublished manuscript.  We 
cannot get in touch with the authors.  Can anyone help shed more light on 
this?  Thanks, 

Preliminary findings on morphological differences between five subspecies of 
Royal Flycatcher Onychorynchus coronatus, by By M. J. Whittingham & R.S.R. 
Williams. The first author has an Oxford affiliation. 

R. KannanProfessor of BiologyUniversity of Arkansas--Fort Smith
Subject: Re: Help with paper
From: Jessica Oswald <oswaldj3 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2015 17:48:20 -0600
Sent.

On Wed, Feb 18, 2015 at 5:43 PM, Fernando Angulo Pratolongo <
0000002212819e53-dmarc-request AT listserv.lsu.edu> wrote:

> Colegas,
>
> Maybe someone can help me with this reference. Will be much apprecciated!
>
> Gregory AJ, Beier P2014Conservation BiologyResponse variables for
> evaluation of the effectiveness of conservation corridors
> 
 

>
> Thanks in advance!
>
> fap
>
>
> Fernando Angulo Pratolongo
> -------------------------------------
> Lambayeque - Perú
> chamaepetes AT yahoo.com
>



-- 
Jessica
____________________________
Postdoctoral Researcher
Museum of Natural Science
Louisiana State University
Subject: Help with paper
From: Fernando Angulo Pratolongo <0000002212819e53-dmarc-request AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2015 23:43:22 +0000
Colegas,
Maybe someone can help me with this reference. Will be much apprecciated!

| Gregory AJ, Beier P | 2014 | Conservation Biology | Response variables for 
evaluation of the effectiveness of conservation corridors | 


 Thanks in advance!
fap


Fernando Angulo Pratolongo-------------------------------------Lambayeque - 
Perúchamaepetes AT yahoo.com 
Subject: Brazilian Journal of Ornithology - Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia
From: Marcos Persio <persio.marcos AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2015 09:02:16 -0800
Hi all,



The latest issue of the Brazilian Journal of Ornithlogy

Revista Brasileira de Ornitologia - RBO - Volume 22 (4) December 2014


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/issue/current/showToc 








EXPERIMENTAL TRANSLOCATIONS: PITFALLS AND ALTERNATIVES FOR QUANTIFYING
ANIMAL MOVEMENT IN FRAGMENTED LANDSCAPES

*Luke Losada Powell, Philip C. Stouffer*
ABSTRACT

As anthropogenic change continues to fragment terrestrial habitats,
conservation biologists are increasingly concerned with how wild animals
move through fragmented landscapes. Experimental translocations have
recently gained popularity as a technique to determine landscape
permeability by wild animals in fragmented landscapes. In experimental
translocations, researchers capture individuals — usually adults — and
release them elsewhere in order to determine whether they are able to cross
the landscape and return to their original location. We argue that most
experimental translocations have two inherent confounding factors — age of
the individual and homing ability — and that the narrow spatiotemporal
scale of the technique may give it limited ability to address the most
important conservation and management questions in fragmented landscapes.
We discuss three alternative techniques (telemetry, capture-mark-recapture,
and landscape genetics), and recommend that experimental translocations
only be undertaken if: 1) they avoid confounding factors; 2) they are
validated by other techniques; and 3) no other options are available for
obtaining the data. We stress that researchers that do proceed with
experimental translocations must acknowledge that they are using an
indirect proxy to quantify natural animal movement.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1030/pdf_868 



#################################################################################################### 

BREEDING BIOLOGY OF THE WHITE-COLLARED SWIFT STREPTOPROCNE ZONARIS IN
SOUTHEASTERN BRAZIL

*Renata Neves Biancalana*
ABSTRACT

White-collared Swifts Streptoprocne zonaris are common throughout the
tropical Americas. They usually breed in colonies in wet caves and next to
waterfalls. Despite their widespread range, little is known about their
breeding biology. Here I present data gathered from 2012 to 2014 at two
breeding sites, Luminosa Cave and Água Comprida waterfall, located within
Intervales State Park, in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. More than 30
nests were found in the cave and one behind a waterfall. The egg-laying
period began in late October and lasted until the first week of November.
Nests were made mostly of bryophytes, with some fresh and dry leaves and
sand. Eggs were dull white, and had an oval shape. Nestlings per nest
varied from 1 to 3. The fledging period was between 41-51 days. This is the
first record for this species of a successful nest with 3 nestlings. The
species showed high nest site fidelity. Plumage development was similar to
other species in the genus.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1048/pdf_881 



################################################################################################## 

RODENT PREDATION BY TURDUS LEUCOMELAS VIEILLOT, 1818 (PASSERIFORMES:
TURDIDAE)

*Pedro de Oliveira Mafia, Matheus Rocha Jorge Corrêa, Antônio Jorge do
Rosário Cruz, Cristiano Schetini de Azevedo*
ABSTRACT

Pale-breasted Thrush (Turdus leucomelas) is described as an omnivorous bird
that forage solitarily or in pairs on the soil. This note reports a rodent
predation event by T. leucomelas. The event was recorded on November 14th
2013, in a riparian Forest fragment of Grande River, in Igarapava
Municipality, São Paulo, Brazil. Although the presence of small
vertebrates on the diet of T. leucomelas is known, this is the first record
of a mammal being predated by this bird species. This record is important
because it contributes to a better understand of the natural history of
Neotropical passerines.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1044/pdf_886 





############################################################################################### 

CRESTED QUETZAL (PHAROMACHRUS ANTISIANUS) PREYING ON A GLASSFROG (ANURA,
CENTROLENIDAE) IN SIERRA DE PERIJÁ, NORTHWESTERN VENEZUELA

*Marcial Ramón Quiroga-Carmona*
ABSTRACT

We report the predation of a glassfrog (Hyalinobatrachium pallidum) by a
Crested Quetzal (Pharomachrus antisianus). The record was made in a
locality in the Sierra de Perijá, near to the northern part of the border
between Colombia and Venezuela, and consisted in observinga male P.
antisianus vocalizing with a glassfrog in its bill. The vocalizations were
answered by a female, which approached the male, took the frog with its
bill and carried it into a cavity built on a landslide. Subsequent to this,
the male remained near to the cavity until the female left it and together
they abandoned this place. Based on the behavior observed in the couple of
quetzals, and what has previously been described that this group of birds
gives their young a diet rich in animal protein comprised of arthropods and
small vertebrates, we believe that the couple was raising a brood at the
time when the observation was carried out.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1043/pdf_889 



################################################################################################### 

AN AVIFAUNAL INVENTORY AND CONSERVATION PROSPECTS FOR THE GURUPI BIOLOGICAL
RESERVE, MARANHÃO, BRAZIL

*Diego Mendes Lima, Carlos Martínez, Daniel Santana Lorenzo Raíces*
ABSTRACT

We carried out an avifaunal inventory of the Gurupi Biological Reserve,
Maranhão, municipalities of Bom Jardim and Centro Novo do Maranhão,
between December 2009 and December 2013. The main objective was to estimate
species richness and identify endemic species. A further objective was to
identify vulnerable and endangered species to provide information for the
development of conservation strategies. Data were collected using
mist-netting and MacKinnon lists, as well as nonsystematic observations. A
total of 424 species were recorded from 64 families; 18 of which considered
endemic taxa. Seven are threatened nationally: Psophia obscura, Guaruba
guarouba, Pyrrhura lepida lepida, Pteroglossus bitorquatus bitorquatus,
Phlegopsis nigromaculata paraensis, Dendrocincla merula badia, and
Dendrocolaptes medius. In addition to these, another eight are threatened
internationally (IUCN 2014): Tinamus tao, Penelope pileata, Lophornis
gouldii, Pyrrhura amazonum, Touit huetii, Pionites leucogaster, Pyrilia
vulturina and Lepidothrix iris. Survey results underscore the extreme
importance of the Gurupi Biological Reserve as a strategic site for the
conservation and maintenance of endemic and endangered species of the
Belém Center of Endemism in Brazilian Amazonia.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1037/pdf_880 



#################################################################################################### 

CORE AND TRANSIENT SPECIES IN AN AMAZONIAN SAVANNA BIRD ASSEMBLAGE

*Roberta Lúcia Boss, José Maria Cardoso da Silva*
ABSTRACT

In this paper, we report the number of core and transient bird species in
an Amazonian savanna site and assess their ecological differences. We
conducted our study at Campo Experimental do Cerrado (CEC) da
Embrapa–Amapá, 48 km north of Macapá (0 ̊2'5" N / 51 ̊2'2" W), Amapá,
Brazil. Forty points were monitored on a monthly basis over the course of
one year, using the unlimited-distance point counts in a plot of 360
hectares of well-preserved and relatively homogeneous upland savanna from
September 2006 to August 2007. Species were classified in core (recorded in
the area in nine or more months), transient (recorded in the area in four
or less months) and intermediate (the ones recorded between five and eight
months). Species were also classified according to feeding guilds and
habitat preferences. Statistical analyses were made to compare core and
transient species. We recorded 72 species in the plot, of which 36 were
transients, 12 were intermediates, and 22 were core. Core species have
higher abundances than transient species. Core species are found mostly in
the savanna while transient species also occur in other habitats within the
landscape. Both core and transient groups presented well-marked seasonal
variation in abundance. Recruitment explains abundance variation for core
species, while differences in the availability of food resources in the
site explains variation of the abundance in transient species. We predict
that plot-level (not more than 500 hectares) bird assemblages in South
American savannas will be composed of a small number of abundant and
habitat-restricted species that occupy the site almost year round, combined
with a high number of low abundant transient species that are habitat
generalists and use the plot only during limited periods of their annual
life cycle.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1121/pdf_884 



################################################################################################### 

RIVERS ACTING AS BARRIERS FOR BIRD DISPERSAL IN THE AMAZON

*Alexandre Fernandes, Mario Cohn-Haft, Tomas Hrbek, Izeni Farias*
ABSTRACT

Morphological, vocal and genetic studies have shown that the Madeira River
and its right bank tributaries delimit populations of primates and birds.
We sequenced the cytochrome b gene (approx. 950 bp) for individuals of
three suboscine passerine bird species, Glyphorynchus spirurus
(Furnariidae), Willisornis poecilinotus (Thamnophilidae) and Schiffornis
turdina (Tityridae), on opposite banks of the Madeira River and two of its
right-bank tributaries, the Aripuanã and Jiparaná rivers. Phylogenetic
hypotheses (parsimony, maximum likelihood and Bayesian analysis) revealed
clades that have over 3.1% genetic differentiation on opposite banks of the
Madeira River for G. spirurus, W. poecilinotus and S. turdina, suggesting
that this river restricts gene flow among populations of these three
species. The Jiparaná and Aripuanã rivers apparently separate distinct
populations of G. spirurus, the smallest species we examined, but not those
of the other two heavier bodied species, W. poecilinotus and S. turdina. In
G. spirurus four clades with high levels of genetic differentiation
(3.2–5.5%) were found to be delimited by the three rivers evaluated,
whereas in W. poecilinotus and S. turdina no genetic structure across the
Jiparaná and Aripuanã rivers was detected. In general, birds that are
known to show population structure across the Madeira tributaries
(Glyphorynchus spirurus, Hemitriccus minor, Hypocnemis rondoni,
Herpsilochmus stotzi, and Hylophylax naevius) have body masses smaller than
those of both Willisornis poecilinotus and Schiffornis turdina, but some
exceptions are discussed. Future studies controlling for several variables
are necessary to determine the extent to which body mass is a useful
predictor of genetic population structure in understory suboscine passerines


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1034/pdf_883 



################################################################################################### 

A CERRADO BIRD COMMUNITY IN THE NORTHERNMOST PORTION OF NORTHEASTERN BRAZIL
- RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CONSERVATION

*Mauro Pichorim, Marcelo da Silva, Bruno Rodrigo de Albuquerque França,
Tonny Marques de Oliveira-Júnior, Marcelo Câmara Rodrigues*
ABSTRACT

he Cerrado is the largest savanna in South America and it is rich in fauna
and flora and considered a biodiversity hotspot. Its contact with the
surrounding Amazon, Atlantic Forest and Caatinga is irregular, forming
large diffuse ecotones in some regions and disjointed patches in others.
The Cerrado patches located in the Amazon are relatively studied, but
little is known about those in the Atlantic Forest and Caatinga. This
article presents information on the composition of a bird community in a
savanna formation on the coast of the northernmost portion of northeast
Brazil (5o23'25"S / 35o30'25"W). This site was visited 17 times between
October 2006 and August 2013. The total richness was 87 species distributed
into 32 families. The following Cerrado endemics were recorded:
Charitospiza eucosma and Porphyrospiza caerulescens. Other species recorded
associated mainly with the Cerrado biome were Heliactin bilophus, Cypsnagra
hirundinacea and Coryphaspiza melanotis. Some vulnerable and near
threatened species were also recorded for the first time in the
northernmost portion of northeastern Brazil, with some of these more than
1,000 km from their previously known localities. The results broaden the
knowledge on the distribution of various species, in addition to providing
information on seasonality and reproduction of others and revealing an
overall lack of information on the composition of avian communities in
little studied areas of Brazil.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1082/pdf_882 



#################################################################################################### 

CONTINUED BIRD SURVEYS IN SOUTHEASTERN COASTAL BRAZILIAN ATLANTIC FORESTS
AND THE IMPORTANCE OF CONSERVING ELEVATIONAL GRADIENTS

*Vagner Cavarzere, Thiago Vernaschi Vieira da Costa, Giulyana Althmann
Benedicto, Luciano Moreira-Lima, Luís Fábio Silveira*
ABSTRACT

Although the Atlantic forest is the best-studied Brazilian phytogeographic
domain, few coastal municipalities of the state of São Paulo can count on
published and critically revised bird species list, which are important
initial steps to organize conservation inniciatives. Here we present
historical records from Bertioga, a northern coastline municipality of the
state of São Paulo, as well as recent records obtained in surveys during
the past years within the municipality. Surveying methods, carried out
between 2008-2011, included point counts, 10-species lists, transect counts
and mist nets. This compendium resulted in 330 documented species, 90 of
which still await documentation. Of these 420 bird species, 85 (20.4%) are
Atlantic forest endemic species and as many as eight, six and 23 are
threatened at the global, national and state levels, respectively.
Seventeen species are reported from Bertioga for the first time. Some
records based exclusively on sightings must be carefully considered,
whereas the species richness reflects the diversity of the habitats we
visited, which varied from lowland and montane forests, to slopes and
fluvial and tidal-influenced environments. We highlight that every habitat
of the region should be continuously inventoried and that the absence of
legal protection of lowland forests (which are not considered under the
elevational threshold of the Serra do Mar State Park) must be reevaluated,
as they harbor a greater number of endemic and threatened species than do
other elevational bands.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1065/pdf_885 



################################################################################################ 

LONG-TRAINED NIGHTJAR (MACROPSALIS FORCIPATA) (AVES, CAPRIMULGIDAE): FIRST
PARAGUAYAN RECORD

*Hans Hostettler, Paul Smith*
ABSTRACT

Abstract: The first observations of Long-trained Nightjar *Macropsalis
forcipata* in Paraguay are documented, confirming speculation that the
species was likely to occur in the country.


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1076/pdf_887 



################################################################################################# 

FIRST RECORDS OF MASKED TITYRA TITYRA SEMIFASCIATA (SPIX, 1825) FOR THE
STATE OF PARANÁ, SOUTHERN BRAZIL

*Fabiane Girardi, Eduardo Carrano*
ABSTRACT

We report the first records of the Masked Tityra (Tityra semifasciata) for
the state of Paraná, in the city of Foz do Iguaçu, between July and
September 2014. These records extend the known distribution range of the
species and establish a new southern limit for its geographic distribution
within Brazil. Although the species occur in nearby regions, it had never
been recorded before in southern Brazil, possibly due to confusion with the
congeneric Black-tailed Tityra (Tityra cayana).


http://www4.museu-goeldi.br/revistabrornito/revista/index.php/BJO/article/view/1066/pdf_888 


###################################

Dr. Marcos Pérsio Dantas Santos

Laboratório de Ecologia e Zoologia de  Vertebrados - Ornitologia
Instituto de Ciências Biológicas
Universidade Federal do Pará
Rua Augusto Corrêa, 01 - Guamá. CEP 66075-110. Caixa postal 479.
Tel.: Sala UFPA - +55 91 3201-8664. Belém - Pará - Brasil

skype: marcos.persio
Subject: NEOLIT: Proc. R. Soc. B March 22, 2015 282
From: Karl Berg <ksb39 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Wed, 18 Feb 2015 08:52:47 -0600
Experimental food supplementation reveals habitat-dependent male
reproductive investment in a migratory bird
Sara A. Kaiser, T. Scott Sillett, Benjamin B. Risk, and Michael S. Webster
Proc. R. Soc. B March 22, 2015 282 20142523; doi:10.1098/rspb.2014.2523
http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/282/1803/20142523.abstract

 

Environmental factors can shape reproductive investment strategies and
influence the variance in male mating success. Environmental effects on
extrapair paternity have traditionally been ascribed to aspects of the
social environment, such as breeding density and synchrony. However, social
factors are often confounded with habitat quality and are challenging to
disentangle. We used both natural variation in habitat quality and a food
supplementation experiment to separate the effects of food availability--one
key aspect of habitat quality--on extrapair paternity (EPP) and reproductive
success in the black-throated blue warbler, *Setophaga caerulescens*. High
natural food availability was associated with higher within-pair paternity
(WPP) and fledging two broods late in the breeding season, but lower EPP.
Food-supplemented males had higher WPP leading to higher reproductive
success relative to controls, and when in low-quality habitat,
food-supplemented males were more likely to fledge two broods but less
likely to gain EPP. Our results demonstrate that food availability affects
trade-offs in reproductive activities. When food constraints are reduced,
males invest in WPP at the expense of EPP. These findings imply that
environmental change could alter how individuals allocate their resources
and affect the selective environment that drives variation in male mating
success.

email: sak275 AT cornell.edu

-- 
--
Karl S. Berg
Assistant Professor
Biological Sciences
University of Texas
One West University Blvd
Brownsville, TX 78520
956-882-5049
karl.berg AT utb.edu
Subject: Gray-cheeked Thrush - Catharus minimus samples
From: Paulo Pulgarin <pulgarinrpc AT YAHOO.COM.MX>
Date: Tue, 17 Feb 2015 16:54:53 -0500
Dear Neoorners,

For a collaborative study on Gray-cheeked Thrush (/Catharus minimus/) 
migration and parasite diversity on wintering and breeding grounds, we 
are seeking for samples (blood, tissue or DNA) of birds during their 
pass throughout South America. If any of you have or know whom might 
have samples of this species, please contact me directly at pulgarinrpc 
[at] yahoo.com.mx.

Thank you so much in advance for any suggestion and passing this message.

Saludos,

Paulo and Camila Gómez

-- 
Paulo C. Pulgarín-R
Ph.D. Student.
Department of Biology
University of Los Andes
Bogotá, Colombia
Tel: +57(1)3394949 ext. 3755.

www.colombiaavianmalaria.co

Subject: NEOLIT: Zootaxa 3918 (4)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 16 Feb 2015 16:21:56 -0500
Neooners,



One paper in Zootaxa, 3918 (4).



Manuel A. Plenge

Lima, Peru



Mlíkovský, Jiří  2015.  The type specimens, type localities and
nomenclature of *Sarcoramphus* vultures (Aves: Cathartidae), with a note on
their speciation.  Zootaxa, 3918 (4): 579-586.

E-mail: mailto:jiri_mlikovsky AT nm.cz 

Abstract: A nomenclatural review of Sarcoramphus vultures resulted in the
following: The genus Sarcoramphus was described by Duméril in 1805 rather
than 1806. Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758, is the type of Sarcoramphus by
subsequent monotypy (Froriep in Duméril 1806), not by Vigors's (1825)
designation. The type of the genus Gypagus Vieillot, 1816, is, by
mono-typy, Vultur gryphus Linnaeus, 1758, not Vultur papa Linnaeus, 1758.
Due to this, Gypagus is a junior objective synonym of Vultur Linnaeus,
1758. Gyparchus was created by Gloger (1841) as a new genus for Vultur papa
Linnaeus, 1758, not as an emendation of Gypagus Vieillot, 1816. Vultur papa
Linnaeus, 1758 was found to be possibly based on syntypes from two
different taxa and a lectotype is here designated. The author of Vultur
sacer is Zimmermann (in Bartram 1793), not Cassin (1853). Possible
speciation events in the genus Sarcoramphus are also discussed.
Subject: NEOLIT: Ornitología Neotropical 25 (4)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 17:47:01 -0500
Neoorners,



Eleven papers in Ornitología Neotropical 25 (4).  Jack Eitniear made
available the information included herewith.



Please note that when the country where the research/investigation has been
carried out is not mentioned in the title or abstract, I have included it
in brackets.



PDF’s should be requested from the authors at the e-mails indicated
below.  Should
the authors not be able to forward the PDF requested, you may then request
same from Jack Eitniear at jce AT cstbinc.org.



Manuel A. Plenge

Lima, Peru



Contreras-González, Ana María, and María del Coro Arizmendi 2014.
Pre-dispersal
seed predation of the columnar cactus (*Neobuxbaumia tetetzo*, Cactaceae)
by birds in central Mexico.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 373-387.

E-mail: acontrerasgonzalez AT gmail.com

Abstract: Seed predation is an ecological and evolutionary force that
affects individuals and populations. A decrease in seed availability caused
by seed predation will influence recruitment rate, affecting population
size and community structure. We evaluated the importance of fruit-eating
birds as predispersal seed predators on columnar cactus (*Neobuxbaumia
tetetzo*) in tropical deciduous forest by measuring their effectiveness as
seed dispersers, which was calculated using the quantity and quality
components of dispersal. The quality component included the quality of the
microhabitat where seeds were deposited until one year after seed
germination. Birds removed 48.4% of the seeds, of which 41.4% were predated
by White-winged Doves (*Zenaida asiatica*), Military Macaws (*Ara militaris*),
and House Finches (*Haemorhous mexicanus*), because the seeds that passed
through its digestive tract were destroyed. The performance of *N.
tetetzo *throughout
one year of survival varied significantly between microhabitats, and only
six yielded positive effects on the survival of this cactus (*Cyrtocarpa
procera*, *Ceiba aesculifolia *var. *parvifolia, Cnidosculus tehuacanensis,
Euphorbia schlechtendalii*, *Amphypteriguim adstringens *and *Mimosa
luisana*)*. *Seeds consumed by Grey-breasted Woodpeckers (*Melanerpes
hypopolius*) and Ladder-backed Woodpeckers (*Picoides scalaris*) were not
destroyed by passing through the gut-track, but after feeding, these
woodpeckers had a high proportion of visits to *N. tetetzo *increasing the
likelihood that seeds were deposited under conspecifics, which are
inadequate sites for seedling establishment. Under the aspect of dispersal
effectiveness, this study demonstrated that pre-dispersal seed predation by
birds and the behavior of woodpeckers after foraging negatively affected
the viability of almost half of the seeds produced by *N. tetetzo*. This
may strongly affect seedling recruitment, one of the key steps in the life
cycle of this cactus.



Braga, Talita V., Felipe L. S. Shibuya, Ricardo A. S. Cerboncini, and James
J. Roper  2014.  An improved method for capturing cavity-nesting birds
tested with the Rufous Hornero (*Furnarius rufus*).  Ornitología
Neotropical, 25: 389-396. [Brazil]

E-mail: talitavbr AT gmail.com

Abstract: Several methods are available to capture cavity-nesting birds but
not all are equally easy to use. Here we propose an improved method, in
which we use a modified fish basket placed over the opening to the nest
using an extendible pole. When a bird enters the basket trap, the entrance
to the trap is closed by pulling on a string that shuts the door securely
with velcro. We used this method to capture the Rufous Hornero (*Furnarius
rufus*), a Neotropical ovenbird that builds enclosed mud nests. Rufous
Horneros, as other birds of open habitats, are often very difficult to
capture with mist nets, apparently because in such habitats mist nets are
relatively easy to recognize and avoided due to the windy and light
conditions. In 2010, we captured 29 birds, none of which abandoned their
nests. While similar to some traps, this trap is light-weight and easier to
carry and mount in the field. Additionally, the trap door assures that the
bird cannot escape once in the trap and it is impossible for the trap to
entangle in nearby plants. It can be adapted for capturing a variety of
species, such as Neotropical ovenbirds, that build enclosed nests, and
cavity-nesting birds, such as woodpeckers, woodcreepers, and parrots.



Sheldon, Kimberly S., Harold F. Greeney, and Robert C. Dobbs  2014.  Nesting
biology of the Flame-faced Tanager (*Tangara parzudakii*) in northeastern
Ecuador.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 397-406.

E-mail: kimberlyssheldon AT gmail.com

Abstract: The Flame-faced Tanager (*Tangara parzudakii*) includes three
recognized subspecies, *urubambae*, *lunigera*, and the nominate *parzudakii,
*that are distinguished based on plumage differences and distribution
aspects. Information is generally lacking on basic breeding biology for
this species, with only a handful of records for the species as a whole,
and only one small note on breeding of the nominate subspecies *parzudakii*.
In order to add fundamental data to the species’ life history, we studied
the breeding biology of *Tangara parzudakii parzudakii *in northeastern
Ecuador from 2001–2009 using general observations and by videotaping
behaviors at the nest with camcorders. In total, we made 22 direct
observations of reproduction. We collected detailed information from 10
nests, analyzed nest components of one nest, and videotaped behavior at one
nest. Flame-faced Tanager on the eastern slope in Ecuador appears to breed
during the rainier months of January–July. The majority of nests were found
in pastures, however, two nests were found in forested habitat, one was
found at the forest edge, and one was found below the roof of a cabin.
Based on copulations during the building phase, the female appears to build
the nest alone while the male waits nearby. Clutch size was two in all
nests. Eggs were white in color with pale brown flecking that was heaviest
toward the larger end. Mean (± SD) brooding bout duration was 8.4 ± 5.6 min
and ranged from 0.33–24.3 min. Both adults provisioned young and, unlike
some *Tangara *species, we did not observe helpers at the nest. We recorded
4.9 feeds per nestling-hour during the brooding period. We did not find
fleas in the nesting material of a nest we collected immediately after
fledging, which may a result of the high rate of sharp and rapid probes
performed by adults in the early nestling period and the sharp probes
performed up to the morning of fledging.



Martin, Paul R., and Robert C. Dobbs  2014.  Asymmetric response to
heterospecific songs in two sympatric wrens (Troglodytidae) in Argentina:
House Wren (*Troglodytes aedon*) and Mountain Wren (*T.
solstitialis*).  Ornitología
Neotropical, 25: 407-419.

E-mail: pm45 AT queensu.ca

Abstract: Behavioral interactions among closely-related species are often
asymmetric, with one species socially dominant over the other. Here we test
for response to congeneric songs between two sympatric species of *Troglodytes
*wrens, House Wren, *T. aedon*, and Mountain Wren, *T. solstitialis*, which
coexist in humid montane Andean forest in northwestern Argentina. We used
reciprocal song playback experiments presented to territorial males of each
species during the breeding season to assess their response to the opposite
species. *Troglodytes aedon *sang more and approached the playback speaker
closer in response to our broadcast of *T. solstitialis *songs than in
response to control songs. *Troglodytes aedon *also sang more in response
to *T. solstitialis *playback than in response to conspecific playback,
while the minimum distance of approach did not differ significantly. In
contrast, *T. solstitialis *sang less and were further from the speaker
during both *T. aedon *and control periods relative to the minute preceding
our experiments. These responses differed from responses to conspecific
playback, where *T. solstitialis *sang more and approached the speaker
closer in relation to controls. Our experiments suggest that *T. aedon *is
aggressive to and dominant over *T. solstitialis*, occupying larger open
areas along a gradient



Bodrati, Alejandro, Kristina L. Cockle, and Facundo G. Di Sallo  2014.  Nesting
of the Short-tailed Antthrush (*Chamaeza campanisona) *in the Atlantic
forest of Argentina.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 421-431.

E-mail: alebodrati AT yahoo.com.ar

Abstract: Little is known of the natural history and reproduction of the
antthrushes (family Formicariidae). Here we provide new information on the
breeding biology of the Short-tailed Antthrush (*Chamaeza campanisona*) in
Misiones province, Argentina. We found 13 nests from September to December
in primary Atlantic forest, in tree cavities produced by wood decay (not
excavated by woodpeckers). The cavities were 5.4 ± 0.8 m (mean ± SE) above
the ground (range = 1.7–9.6 m); their entrances were at least 4 cm in
diameter; and their vertical depth was 111 ± 27 cm (range = 32–312 cm).
Before eggs were laid, both adults used leaves to cover the cavity floor or
construct a platform mid-cavity. The 2–3 white eggs were incubated by both
adults, with bouts lasting 119 ± 11 min (range = 82–145 min). From
observations at two nests, we estimate the incubation period at 18 days.
Adults brought leaves when they arrived to incubate, forming a wall of
green leaves around their eggs. Nestlings were covered in
violet-tinted grey down
when they hatched, they had open eyes on day 10, and pin feathers were
opening on their bodies and wings on day 16. Both adults fed the nestlings
arthropods (51% caterpillars), taking on average 2.6 ± 0.2 prey items at a
time (range = 1–7). As the nestling period progressed, the adults visited
the nest less frequently but brought more prey items per visit. They
removed fecal sacs beginning on day 8. Each adult used a different sector
of the forest and had its own established route to arrive at the nest.
Nestlings fledged after 22–23 days, making a short flight when an adult
arrived at the cavity. The fledglings looked like adults but had shorter
tails; shorter, lighter-colored bill; and a remnant of the yellow gape
flanges. Several aspects of nesting were similar to the Black-faced
Antthrush (*Formicarius analis*), but more studies are needed to determine
whether these patterns can be generalized to the rest of the family.



Esclarski, Priscilla, and Renato Cintra  2014.  Effects of terra
firme-forest structure on habitat use by owls (Aves: Strigiformes) in
central Brazilian Amazonia.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 433-458.

E-mail: cintra AT inpa.gov.br

Abstract: Owls are a poorly-studied avian group, despite their
well-established role in prey regulation and biological control. For
Neotropical species, distribution and abundance are especially poorly
known. Structural components of forests have been used to explain patterns
of owl habitat use and community structure, but such analyses have largely
focused on species in the northern hemisphere. The present study examines
whether components of forest structure influence habitat use (occurrence
and abundance) for six species of owls in an upland forest in central
Amazonian Brazil. Between October and November 2012, a playback method was
used to sample occurrence and abundance in 30 points, each separated from
the next by 1 km. Multiple linear regression analysis revealed
relationships between four owl species and components of forest structure
associated with food availability: Amazonian Pygmy Owl (*Glaucidium hardyi)
*and distance to nearest stream (*p *= 0.023), Northern Tawny-bellied
Screech Owl *(Megascops watsonii*) and leaf-litter depth (*p *= 0.045),
Crested Owl *(Lophostrix cristata*) and dead fallen trunks on forest floor (*p
*= 0.042), and Spectacled Owl *(Pulsatrix perspicillata*) and dead fallen
trunks on forest floor (*p *= 0.009). A multiple logistic regression also
revealed a significant association (*p *= 0.050) between the Spectacled Owl
and dead fallen trunks on forest floor. The influence of the
components of forest
structure differs between the species, demonstrating interspecific
differences in micro-habitat use, and reflecting the importance of food
resource availability in habitat choice.



Contreras Chialchia, Andrés Oscar, and Paul Smith  2014.  A notable hybrid
woodpecker (*Campephilus leucopogon *x *C. melanoleucus*) (Aves: Picidae)
from Paraguay.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 459-464.

E-mail: faunaparaguay AT gmail.com

Abstract: Non given.



Réglade, Michel Antoine, Daniela Siel, and Manuel Uribe  2014.  Bait
fishing Black-crowned Night Heron (*Nycticorax nycticorax*) in Chile.
Ornitología
Neotropical, 25: 465-468.

E-mail: michel.reglade AT voila.fr

Abstract: Non given.



Sainz-Borgo, Cristina  2014.  Observation of a calling assemblage in the
Collared Trogon (*Trogon collaris*).  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 469-472.
[Venezuela]

E-mail: cristinasainzb AT usb.ve

Abstract: Non given.



Chaparro-Herrera, Sergio, Danilo Santos, and Pablo Casallas  2014.  Notas
de anidación del Trepatroncos Picofuerte (*Xiphocolaptes promeropirhynchus*)
en Colombia.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 473-476.

E-mail: sergioupn AT gmail.com

Abstract: *Breeding notes for the Strong-billed Woodcreeper (Xiphocolaptes
promeropirhynchus) inColombia.*



Avalos, Verónica del R., and M. Isabel Gómez  2014.  Observations on nest
site and parental care of the critically endangered Royal Cinclodes (*Cinclodes
aricomae*) in Bolivia.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 477-480.

E-mail: veronikavalos AT gmail.com

Abstract: Non given.
Subject: NEOLIT: Ornitología Neotropical 25 (3)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 15:14:43 -0500
Neoorners,



Ten papers in Ornitología Neotropical 25 (3).  Jack Eitniear made available
the information included herewith.



Please note that when the country where the research/investigation has been
carried out is not mentioned in the title or abstract, I have included it
in brackets.



PDF’s should be requested from the authors at the e-mails indicated
below.  Should
the authors not be able to forward the PDF requested, you may then request
same from Jack Eitniear at jce AT cstbinc.org.



Manuel A. Plenge

Lima, Peru



Caicedo-Argüelles, Adriana del Pilar, and Lorena Cruz-Bernate  2014.
Actividades
diarias y uso de hábitat de la Reinita Amarilla (*Setophaga petechia*) y la
Piranga Roja (*Piranga rubra*) en un área verde urbana de Cali,
Colombia.  Ornitología
Neotropical, 25: 247-260.

E-mail: caicedoa.adriana AT gmail.com

Abstract: *Daily activities and habitat use of Yellow Warbler (Setophaga
petechia) and Red Tanager (Piranga rubra) in a green urban area in Cali,
Colombia. – *Migratory birds are a group with complex ecology because they
are affected by a variety of biotic and abiotic factors throughout their
annual cycle. Although a lot of research has been conducted, further
information on basic aspects such as feeding ecology is needed. From
September 2011 to April 2012, a study was done on habitat use by Yellow
Warbler (*Setophaga petechia*) and Red Tanager (*Piranga rubra*) on the
campus of Universidad del Valle, Cali, Colombia. The recorded data included
species, activity and its duration, foraging method, tree species,
substrate, and height. “Foraging” was the activity with the largest
proportion of time spent by birds; “Gleaning” was the most common foraging
method used by the Yellow Warbler, while the Red Tanager used “Hovering”
and “Sallying.” Of 50 plant species used, *Samanea saman*, *Pithecellobium
dulce*, *Guazuma ulmifolia*, *Leucaena leucocephala*, *Clitoria
fairchildiana*, and *Jacaranda caucana *were preferred. The most used
height interval was 4–6 m, and substrates where birds were observed most
frequently were “Twig,” “Leaves, flowers and fruits,” and “Secondary
branch.” The present study demonstrates that an area with abundant trees
can provide habitat for migratory birds, despite being located in an urban
environment.



Trejos-Araya, Carla, and Gilbert Barrantes  2014.  Natural history and
acoustic repertoire of the Large-footed Finch (*Pezopetes capitalis*), an
endemic, highland bird of Costa Rica and western Panama.  Ornitología
Neotropical, 25: 261-271.

E-mail: ktrejos07 AT gmail.com

Abstract: The Large-footed Finch is an endemic inhabitant of the understory
of montane forest and páramo in the highlands of Costa Rica and western
Panama. Although this species is common, information regarding its
reproductive biology and natural history is scarce. In this study, we
described habitat use, reproductive behavior, parental care, and the
acoustic repertoire of the Large-footed Finch. Pairs are monogamous and
territorial, and each pair reproduces more than once a year, but
reproduction among pairs is asynchronous. Both sexes participate in nest
construction and offspring care (usually one chick per breeding event). The
acoustic repertoire of the Large-footed Finch consists of two song types,
which differ in temporal and acoustical characteristics (e.g., frequency
range, maximum and minimum frequency). The first song is a solo used by
males in two contexts: morning songs and territorial aggressive displays.
The second song is a highly synchronize duet, sung by both sexes, though
sometimes the male sings its part of the duet alone. The duet is sung when
a pair reunites after a spatial separation, or more frequently as a
territorial defensive display.



Martínez-García, Vanessa, and Raul Ortiz-Pulido  2014.  Redes mutualistas
colibrí-planta: comparación en dos escalas espaciales.  Ornitología
Neotropical, 25: 273-289. [Mexico]

E-mails: raulortizpulido AT yahoo.com

Ab stract: *Hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks: comparison at two
spatial scales. – *Mutualistic interactions are the functional basis of
ecological communities. One of the most important mutualistic interactions
is pollination, such as between hummingbirds (Trochilidae) and many plant
species. The hummingbird-plant interactions can be better understood by the
use of mutualistic networks approach. Through this approach we can define,
for example, key species of a community and the effect that its extinction
can cause in such community. Despite of its ecological importance, several
aspects of hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks are unknown, e.g., if key
species are similar between different spatial scales. In this paper, we
determined at two spatial scales (landscape and vegetation type) the degree
of specialization of such networks, and dependence and asymmetry of
interacting species of hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks at Metztitlan
Ravine Biosphere Reserve, Mexico. During one year of systematic sampling,
we recorded eight hummingbird species and 27 species of plants visited by
them at landscape level. The degree of specialization as well as the values
of dependence and asymmetry indicate that each vegetation type has
different key species, and that some of these species are key species at
landscape level, too. *Cynanthus latirostris *and *Hylocharis leucotis *were
the key hummingbirds species at landscape level, while *C. latirostris
*and *Calothorax
lucifer *were key species for Submontane Scrub and *H. leucotis *for Oak
Forest and Pine-Oak Forest. The key plant species at landscape level
were *Pachycereus
marginatus *and *Salvia Mexicana *while *P. marginatus *was important for
Submontane Scrub, *Cirsium ehrembergii *for Pine-Oak Forest, and *S.
mexicana *and *S. microphylla *were important for Oak forest. Our results
suggest that the spatial level of analysis determines the identity of the
key species in hummingbird-plant mutualistic networks, which must be taken
into account when aiming at the conservation of such networks in a
landscape.



Hernández-Pérez, Edwin, Miguel Angel Martínez-Morales, Ariadna
Tobón-Sampedro, Gonzalo Pinilla-Buitrago, Mauro Sanvicente López, and
Rafael Reyna-Hurtado  2014.  Registros notables que amplían la distribución
conocida de dos especies de crácidos (Aves: Galliformes) en la Península de
Yucatán, México.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 291-301.

E-mail: mmartinez AT ecosur.mx

Abstract: *Noteworthy records expanding the known distribution of two
cracid species (Aves: Galliformes) in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico. – *The
Crested Guan (*Penelope purpurascens*) and the Great Curassow (*Crax rubra*)
are two cracid species of conservation concern at regional and global
levels. Their presence in the north western coast of the Yucatan Peninsula
had not been previously documented, showing our partial knowledge of their
geographic distribution, even in approachable areas. In this study, we
provide evidence for their presence in the region within two natural
protected areas and their surroundings. We obtained the records through the
use of camera-traps deployed on Peten ecosystems from August to October
2013. These records expand the known distribution of both species in the
Yucatan Peninsula, and provide regional validation to the species
distribution models recently built from an exhaustive compilation of their
existing global geographic records. Additionally, we give information on
sex and age proportion, group composition, and evidence of reproductive
activity. Given the high vulnerability of these species, this new piece of
information should be considered in the definition of appropriate
strategies for the conservation of their populations and habitats in the
region, both within and outside the natural protected areas.



Bonilla Ruz, Carlos, Tiberio C. Monterrubio-Rico, Luis Manuel Aviles-Ramos,
and Claudia Cinta-Magallon  2014.  Anidación gregaria y éxito reproductivo
en la Guacamaya Verde (*Ara militaris*) en un bosque tropical costero del
occidente de México.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 303-316.

E-mail: tmonter2002 AT yahoo.com.mx

Abstract: *Gregarious nesting and reproductive success in the Military
Macaw (Ara militaris) in a coastal tropical forest in Western Mexico. *– We
studied nest sites, nesting success, chick productivity, and social
behavior of the Military Macaw (*Ara militaris*) in perhaps the last
population that nests in tree cavities in tropical coastal forest near
Puerto Vallarta, Mexico. Thirteen nest trees were located in five tree
species, but most nesting pairs used *Piranhea mexicana *(Picrodendraceae).
Three nest trees contained multiple nesting pairs; one tree contained three
pairs nesting simultaneously. Nesting trees were located in three
vegetation types, but tropical semideciduous forest contained 75% of the
nests, yielding a nesting tree density of 2.0/km2 and a nesting pair
density of 3.0/km2. We systematically monitored seven nests all within
tropical semideciduous forest. All seven monitored nests succeeded and
produced an average of 1.28 chicks that reached fledging age. However, we
were unable to monitor hatching and fledging success, although no signs of
predation were evident in the surroundings. Although the sample size of
nests is small, reproductive performance and tree and forest
characteristics allowed us to hypothesize that this macaw population is
nesting in an area that likely contains the highest quality among all the
studied Military Macaw populations in Mexico. It is essential to outline
with precision the forest extent containing suitable nesting conditions, as
well as the nesting population size. The observed nesting tolerance may
facilitate management and conservation actions for the species in the
region, offering opportunities to design environmental education
initiatives compatibles with ecotourism. Urgent conservation measures
include a total prohibition of logging of all large emergent live and
decaying trees in the region; ideally, the area should be designated as
wildlife sanctuary for habitat protection of endangered species.



Derlindati, Enrique J., Marcelo C. Romano, Nancy N. Cruz, Caterina Barisón,
Felicity Arengo, and Ignacio M. Barberis  2014.  Seasonal activity patterns
and abundance of Andean Flamingo (*Phoenicoparrus andinus*) at two
contrasting wetlands in Argentina.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 317-331.

E-mail: ejderlindati AT gmail.com

Abstract: The Andean Flamingo (*Phoenicoparrus andinus)*, one of three
flamingo species in southern South America makes complementary and
alternative use of high Andean wetlands in Argentina, Bolivia, Chile and
Peru, and lowland wetlands in Argentina over its life cycle. Previous
studies have focused on its behavior in Andean sites, but there are no such
studies in lowland sites. Therefore, we analyzed the activity patterns,
courtship displays, and individual abundance of this flamingo species at
two contrasting wetland sites, Laguna de Vilama, located at 4500 m a.s.l.
in northwestern Argentina and used in summer during the breeding season,
and Laguna Melincué, a lowland wetland located at 84 m a.s.l. in the plains
of central east Argentina and used in winter during the non-breeding
season. There were marked differences in flamingo abundance and activity
patterns between sites and years. In Laguna de Vilama, flamingos were
feeding most of the time (95%), whereas at Laguna Melincué, flamingos
showed a broader range of behaviors, with only a 60% of time spent feeding.
We did not record marching displays at Laguna de Vilama, whereas at Laguna
Melincué we recorded marching events in each of the three study years,
being more frequent and lasting longer in the year with higher flamingo
abundance. The differences in behaviors at these sites are associated with
resource quality and availability and with timing of the reproductive
cycle, with lowland wetlands providing critical habitats for courtship
displays that influence reproductive success of this species breeding
colonies in high Andean wetlands.



Vargas-Fonseca, Elena María  2014.  Relación entre la diversidad de aves
acuáticas y la variación temporal de las dimensiones de un humedal
palustrino en Puntarenas, Costa Rica.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 333-343.

E-mail: elena.vargasf AT gmail.com

Abstgract: *Relation between diversity of waterfowl and temporal variation
of the dimensions of a palustrine wetland in Puntarenas, Costa Rica. – 
*Laguna 

Pochotal is a palustrine wetland, uncommon in the Pacific coast of Costa
Rica. However, information about it is scarce, scattered, and overall
lacking. The aim of this study was to record the waterfowl community of the
Laguna Pochotal and the dimensions of the wetland throughout an annual
cycle in order to understand the relation between biotic and abiotic
factors, and ultimately to provide reliable knowledge that enables the
local government to manage and conserve this wetland. The study was
conducted between May 2009 and April 2010, when 19 species belonging to 11
families were recorded. The estimators Chao 2 and Jack 1 state that the
proportion of registered species was 98%. The average relative abundance of
the waterfowl community in the period of study was 32.66 individuals.
According to the monthly richness and using the Jaccard index, the
community composition of aquatic birds was divided into four periods: 1)
May, June, and July; 2) August, September, and November; 3) October,
December, and January; 4) February, March, and April. During the rainy
season (May–October), species richness was significantly correlated with
depth, area, and perimeter while the abundance was not correlated to any of
the physical variables. During the dry season (November to April), both the
abundance and richness were significantly correlated to the variables
depth, area and perimeter. The data indicate that the waterfowl community
is responding to other factors than the physical variables analyzed in this
study, and the context suggests that prey availability could be an
important factor, to be analyzed in future studies. It is important that
the natural seasonal fluctuations of the physical variables of the wetland
are not aggravated by drainages or human impacts that could cause its
desiccation during the dry season and negatively affect the trophic
cascades that occur in this ecosystem.



Ortiz-Pulido, Raúl, and Carlos Lara  2014.  Owls in oak and pine forests in
La Malinche National Park, Mexico.  Ornitología Neotropical, 25: 345-353.

E-mail: raulortizpulido AT yahoo.com

Abstract: Little is known about Neotropical owls. In particular, in many
areas their presence is unconfirmed and several parameters about these
populations are unknown. Hence, our study aimed to assess the diversity,
habitat association, and densities of owls inhabiting La Malinche National
Park, the only natural protected area in the state of Tlaxcala, Mexico. As
result we report seven owl species: Barn Owl (*Tyto alba*), Western
Screech-Owl (M*egascops kennicottii*), Whiskered Screech-Owl (*M.
trichopsis*), Great Horned Owl (*Bubo virginianus*), Northern
Pygmy-Owl (*Glaucidium
gnoma*), Burrowing Owl (*Athene cunicularia*), and Northern Saw-whet
Owl (*Aegolius
acadicus*). We detected these species by using point counts in three
vegetation types (pine, oak, and mixed pine-oak forest) that occur in this
natural protected area. The species with the highest number of
vocalizations/km2 was the Western Screech-Owl (0.25 vocalizations/km2)
followed by the Great Horned Owl (0.23). Some species showed a clear
preference for a specific vegetation type; for example, the Western
Screech-Owl was recorded with more frequency in oak forest, while its
congener the Whiskered Screech-Owl was only recorded in pine forest. Our
results provide the first list of the owl species inhabiting this natural
protected area and suggest the need for updating existing species lists.



Ferrer-Sánchez, Yarelys, and Ricardo Rodríguez-Estrella  2014.  Notas sobre
anidación del Gavilán Colilargo (*Accipiter gundlachi*) en Cuba. Ornitología 

Neotropical, 25: 355-361.

E-mail: yferrersanchez AT gmail.com

Abstract: Notes on nesting of the endemic Gundlach’s Hawk (*Accipiter
gundlachi*) in Cuba.



Menezes, João C. T. de, Bruno C. Barbosa, and Fabio Prezoto  2014.  Previously
unreported nesting associations of the Yellow-Olive Flycatcher (*Tolmomyias
sulphurescens*) (Aves: Tyrannidae) with social wasps and bees.  Ornitología
Neotropical, 25: 363-368. [Brazil]

E-mail: barbosa.bc AT outlook.com

Abstract: Non given.
Subject: NEOLIT: Journal of Applied Ecology
From: Alejandra Pizarro <alejapizarro AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 13 Feb 2015 17:22:19 -0200
Dear Neoorners,



No papers about neotropical birds in Journal of Applied Ecology 52
(1). However,
for those interested in that journal, I recommend taking a look at the
contents since access to articles is open and free in this issue.


Have a nice weekend

-- 
Alejandra Pizarro Muñoz
Mestranda em Ecologia.
Laboratório de Ecologia de Populações
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul
Porto Alegre-RS-Brasil
Subject: Re: Request: Todd 1942, Tinamidae
From: Frederik Brammer <frebram AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2015 21:54:36 -0200
I have now received the paper.
FB
On Wed, Feb 11, 2015 at 5:05 PM, Frederik Brammer  wrote:

> Hello all,
>
> We need this paper, so if someone has a scan/pdf, sharing it would be much
> appreciated:
>
> Todd, W.E.C., 1942: List of the tinamous in the collection of the Carnegie
> Museum. Annals of the Carnegie Museum 29: 1-29.
>
> Saludos y atenciosamente,
> Frederik Brammer
>
>
Subject: NEOLIT: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society 114 (3)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2015 18:39:35 -0500
Neoorners,



One paper in Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, 114 (3).



Manuel A. Plenge

Lima, Peru



Mason, Nicholas A., and Kevin J. Burns  2015.  The effect of habitat and
body size on the evolution of vocal displays in Thraupidae (tanagers), the
largest family of songbirds.  Biological Journal of the Linnean Society,
114: 538-551.

E-mail: nam232 AT cornell.edu

Abstract: Animals rely on auditory cues to relay important information
between individuals regarding territoriality, mating status, and individual
condition. The efficacy of acoustic signals can depend on many factors,
including the transmitter, the receiver, and the signalling environment. In
the present study, we evaluate the effect of body size and habitat on the
evolution of learned vocal displays across the tanagers (Aves: Thraupidae),
a group that comprises nearly 10% of all songbird species. We find that
body size affects tanager vocalizations, such that nine out of ten song
characters and scores from two principal component axes were correlated
with mass. More specifically, larger tanagers tended to produce
slower-paced, lower-pitched vocal displays within narrower bandwidths. In
contrast, habitat was correlated with only three out of ten song
characters, and only one of these characters corroborated the directional
predictions of the acoustic adaptation hypothesis. Thus, morphological
characters, such as body mass, may play a more important role than
variation among signalling environments in the evolution of avian vocal
displays.
Subject: Request: Todd 1942, Tinamidae
From: Frederik Brammer <frebram AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 11 Feb 2015 17:05:35 -0200
Hello all,

We need this paper, so if someone has a scan/pdf, sharing it would be much
appreciated:

Todd, W.E.C., 1942: List of the tinamous in the collection of the Carnegie
Museum. Annals of the Carnegie Museum 29: 1-29.

Saludos y atenciosamente,
Frederik Brammer
Subject: NEOLIT: Zeledonia (18:2)
From: "Alejandra Martinez (CATIE)" <amartinez AT CATIE.AC.CR>
Date: Sun, 8 Feb 2015 22:32:54 +0000
Estimados Amigos,
La ltima versin del Boletn Zeledonia (Volumen 18:2) ya se encuentra 
disponible en la siguiente direccin: 

http://www.avesdecostarica.org/biblioteca/revista-zeledonia/ 

Esperamos que sea de su agrado, cualquier pregunta y/o consulta no duden en 
contactarnos. 


Atentamente,

Alejandra Martnez-Salinas
En nombre del Comit Editorial
Asociacin Ornitolgica de Costa Rica (AOCR)
boletin.zeledonia AT gmail.com 
http://www.avesdecostarica.org

===================================================================

Dear Friends,
The last issue of the Zeledonia Bulletin is now available in the following 
address: 

http://www.avesdecostarica.org/biblioteca/revista-zeledonia/ 

We hope the information included is useful, any questions or comments please do 
not hesitate to contact us. 


Alejandra Martnez-Salinas
On behalf of the Editorial Committee
Costa Rican Ornithological Association (AOCR) 
boletin.zeledonia AT gmail.com 
http://www.avesdecostarica.org  
Subject: Re: Aw: [NEOORN-L] NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 1, January 2015
From: Lucas Marti <lucasjosemarti AT YAHOO.COM.AR>
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2015 17:40:45 +0000
Sent
      De: Juan F. Masello 
 Para: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
 Enviado: Miércoles, 4 de febrero, 2015 7:38:30
 Asunto: [NEOORN-L] Aw: [NEOORN-L] NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 
1, January 2015 

   
Hi! Could anyone of you share with me a PDF of the following paper? Thank you 
very much. Cheers, JUAN Avian Hematology 

Michael P. Jones
Veterinary Clinics of North America, The: Exotic Animal Practice
vol. 18, 1, p51–61Dr. Juan F. Masello
Justus Liebig University Giessen

Personal information and publications

https://www.uni-giessen.de/cms/fbz/fb08/Inst/tsz/voekophysiologie/mitarbeiter/juma1 


Burrowing Parrot
http://www.uni-giessen.de/~gf1702/

Penguins
http://www.seabirdtracking.org/?q=Sphenisciformes

Working Group Psittaciformes, International Ornithologist's Union
https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/parrot-specialist-group

   

  
Subject: Re: Aw: [NEOORN-L] NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 1, January 2015
From: Carolina Minio <carolinaianido AT YAHOO.COM.AR>
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2015 13:08:19 +0000
 Hi Juan,I did not get the data of the paper you are looking for, maybe I am 
able to send you a PDF, if you can tell me what is it... 

Saludos,Caro MiñoIBS-UNaM/CONICETArgentina

De: Juan F. Masello 
 Para: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU 
 Enviado: Miércoles, 4 de febrero, 2015 7:38:30
 Asunto: [NEOORN-L] Aw: [NEOORN-L] NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 
1, January 2015 

   
Hi! Could anyone of you share with me a PDF of the following paper? Thank you 
very much. Cheers, JUAN Avian Hematology 

Michael P. Jones
Veterinary Clinics of North America, The: Exotic Animal Practice
vol. 18, 1, p51–61Dr. Juan F. Masello
Justus Liebig University Giessen

Personal information and publications

https://www.uni-giessen.de/cms/fbz/fb08/Inst/tsz/voekophysiologie/mitarbeiter/juma1 


Burrowing Parrot
http://www.uni-giessen.de/~gf1702/

Penguins
http://www.seabirdtracking.org/?q=Sphenisciformes

Working Group Psittaciformes, International Ornithologist's Union
https://groups.google.com/forum/?fromgroups#!forum/parrot-specialist-group

   

  
Subject: Aw: [NEOORN-L] NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 1, January 2015
From: "Juan F. Masello" <Juan.Masello AT GMX.DE>
Date: Wed, 4 Feb 2015 11:38:30 +0100




Subject: NEOLIT: Journal of Ornithology, Vol 156, No 1, January 2015
From: Bernd Freymann <bernd.freymann AT GMX.DE>
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 20:09:27 +0100




Subject: NEOLIT: Manual for ageing and sexing Chilean lannbirds
From: James V Remsen <najames AT LSU.EDU>
Date: Tue, 3 Feb 2015 15:41:40 +0000
NEOORN: available as a download:

Citation: Pyle, P., A. Engilis Jr., and D.A. Kelt. 2015. Manual for ageing and 
sexing landbirds of Bosque Fray Jorge National Park and North-central Chile, 
with notes on occurrence and breeding seasonality. Special Publication of the 
Occasional Papers of the Museum of Natural Science. ISBN # 978-1-4951-3624-5 



https://sites01.lsu.edu/wp/mnspapers/files/2015/02/Manual-for-Ageing-and-Sexing-Birds-at-Fray-Jorge-National-Park-Pyle-et-al-2Feb2015.pdf 




=================

Dr. J. V. Remsen
Prof. of Natural Science and Curator of Birds
Museum of Natural Science/Dept. Biological Sciences
LSU, Baton Rouge, LA 70803
najamesLSU.edu
Subject: Hilton Pond 11/01/14 (Costa Rica-East Hummingbird Report)
From: "Bill Hilton Jr. (RESEARCH)" <research AT HILTONPOND.ORG>
Date: Mon, 2 Feb 2015 10:19:38 -0500
It's taken me so long to put together the photos, text, and data summarizing 
Operation RubyThroat's November 2014 highly successful hummingbird banding trip 
to Ujarrás on the Caribbean slope of Costa Rica, I just can't wait any longer! 
It's now on-line and includes many images of tropical birds (resident and 
migrant), plants, people, and landscapes—including an erupting volcano. 


It’s posted as the better-late-than-never installment of “This Week at 
Hilton Pond” for 1 November 2014 at 

http://www.hiltonpond.org/ThisWeek141101.html 
 . There are lots of images, so 
it may take a while to download. 


Happy (Neotropical) Nature Watching!

BILL

Please "Like" our new Facebook pages at http://www.facebook.com/HiltonPond 
 for timely updates on nature topics, 

and for info about hummingbirds at http://www.facebook.com/rubythroats 
 


Follow us on Twitter  AT hiltonpond
=========

RESEARCH PROGRAM
c/o BILL HILTON JR., D.Sci.
Executive Director
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History
1432 DeVinney Road, York, South Carolina 29745 USA
office & cell (803) 684-5852

Please visit our web sites (courtesy of Comporium.net ):
Hilton Pond Center for Piedmont Natural History at http://www.hiltonpond.org 
 

"Operation RubyThroat: The Hummingbird Project" at http://www.rubythroat.org 
 


==================
Subject: NEOLIT: Biologist (Lima) 12 (2)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 1 Feb 2015 11:28:09 -0500
Neoorners,



Two papers in Biologist (Lima) 12 (2).  They can be downloaded from
http://sisbib.unmsm.edu.pe/BVRevistas/biologist/v12_n2/contenido.htm



Manuel A. Plenge

Lima, Peru



Ortiz Z., César  2014.  Baños de sol de la Golondrina Azul y Blanca
*Pygochelidon
cyanoleuca* (Hirundinidae).  Biologist (Lima), 12: 399-401.

Abstract: We report a group of blue and white swallows (*Pygochelidon
cyanoleuca*) sunbathing at 10:45 am on a wall of a cliff in Cural
irrigation, Arequipa.  While the birds were perched on the soil (N=40),
they performed grooming activities and some exposed their entire body to
the sun (N=12).  This behavior has been observed in only seven species of
swallows, and has not been reported previously for this species.



Vizcarra, Jhonson K.  2014.  Ampliación del rango altitudinal de *Lophonetta
specularioides* (Aves: Anatidae) en Tacna, sur del Perú.  Biologist (Lima),
12: 403-405.

Abstract: We present the lowest altitude records of *Lophonetta
specularioides* for the department of Tacna and the altitudinal range of
this species in southern Peru.  These records are at 730 m and 1760 m below
the known altitudinal range of this species in Peru.
Subject: NeoLit PloS Biology
From: Carlos Bosque Engelhardt <carlosb AT USB.VE>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 16:13:12 -0430
*Optimal Conservation Outcomes Require Both Restoration and Protection*

Hugh P. Possingham, Michael Bode, Carissa J. Klein

   - Published: January 27, 2015
   - DOI: 10.1371/journal.pbio.1002052


​h.possingham AT uq.edu.au
One of the examples deals with Biodiversity Conservation in Paraguay’s
Atlantic Forests
Abstract Conservation outcomes are principally achieved through the
protection of intact habitat or the restoration of degraded habitat.
Restoration is generally considered a lower priority action than protection
because protection is thought to provide superior outcomes, at lower costs,
without the time delay required for restoration. Yet while it is broadly
accepted that protected intact habitat safeguards more biodiversity and
generates greater ecosystem services per unit area than restored habitat,
conservation lacks a theory that can coherently compare the relative
outcomes of the two actions. We use a dynamic landscape model to integrate
these two actions into a unified conservation theory of protection and
restoration. Using nonlinear benefit functions, we show that both actions
are crucial components of a conservation strategy that seeks to optimise
either biodiversity conservation or ecosystem services provision. In
contrast to conservation orthodoxy, in some circumstances, restoration
should be strongly preferred to protection. The relative priority of
protection and restoration depends on their costs and also on the different
time lags that are inherent to both protection and restoration. We derive a
simple and easy-to-interpret heuristic that integrates these factors into a
single equation that applies equally to biodiversity conservation and
ecosystem service objectives. We use two examples to illustrate the theory:
bird conservation in tropical rainforests and coastal defence provided by
mangrove forests.​

​Open access download from:

http://www.plosbiology.org/article/fetchObject.action?uri=info:doi/10.1371/journal.pbio.1002052&representation=PDF 


-- 
Carlos Bosque
Dept. Biología de Organismos
Universidad Simón Bolívar, Caracas

http://scholar.google.co.ve/citations?user=ubbioYgAAAAJ&hl=en

 

*"Un país no investiga por ser rico, es rico porque investiga**"* J. C. Espín 

de Gear
Subject: NEOLIT: Biodiversity and Conservation 23 (8)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 15:26:19 -0500
Neoorners,



I have not seen in Neolit the paper shown below.



Manuel A. Plenge

Lima, Peru



Kobelkowsky-Vidrio, Tania, César A. Ríos-Muñoz, and Adolfo G.
Navarro-Sigüenza  2014.  Biodiversity and biogeography of the avifauna of
the Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico.  Biodiversity and Conservation, 23:
2087-2105.

E-mail: tkobel AT gmail.com

Abstract: The Sierra Madre Occidental (SMOc) is located in the boundary
between the Nearctic and Neotropical regions, area which has been
considered as a complex transition zone. We analysed biogeographic patterns
of its resident avifauna, including species richness, endemism, and biotic
regionalization by analysing presence-absence matrices of 148 species of
resident-terrestrial birds. We created the species richness maps by
overlapping potential distribution maps obtained for each species via
species distribution models (SDMs). To depict biogeographic patterns, we
used strict consensus cladograms from parsimony analyses of endemicity
(PAE) and phenograms from an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic
average clustering algorithm. The Pacific slope of the SMOc contains the
highest species richness, decreasing towards the northeast, and reflected
in endemic and endangered species richness patterns. The PAE resulted in
one area of endemism represented by the whole SMOc, outlining a divided
area in its Pacific slope. The cluster analyses divided the area into two.
One group towards the Pacific slope, delimited by the mountain ridge and
characterized by tropical vegetation types and Mexican-Mesoamerican
affinities; the other group is located towards the east and northeast,
characterized by arid and temperate types of vegetation and Nearctic
affinities. These results evidence a transition from a tropical to a
temperate composition of bird species. In this way the location for a
boundary between the Nearctic and the transition zone, for birds in this
part of Mexico, is restricted to these highest elevations.
Subject: Re: Atualidades Ornitológicas N° 182 Nov/Dec 2014
From: Frederik Brammer <frebram AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sat, 31 Jan 2015 08:49:13 -0200
This one was missing:

Page 24:
Tulaci Bhakti Faria Duarte, João Carlos de Castro Pena & Marcos Rodrigues:
Novo registro do cuitelão *Jacamaralcyon tridactyla* (Vieillot, 1817) em
fragmento florestal urbano de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais.

Regards,
Frederik


2015-01-30 11:31 GMT-02:00 Jeremy Minns :

> p. 4    Lílian Mariana Costa (lilian.mcosta AT gmail.com), Guilherme
> Henrique Silva de Freitas & Marcos Rodrigues. Ninho de ema *Rhea
> americana* em eucaliptal e comportamento de defesa do macho.
>
> p. 8    Cristiane da Silva Monte (cris.s.monte AT gmail.com), Alysson Guedes
> Coutinho, Ricardo S. Rosa & Alan Loures-Ribeiro. Utilização de materiais
> artificiais na construção do ninho de *Pitangus sulphuratus *(Linnaeus,
> 1766): um estudo de caso no estado da Paraíba, Brasil.
>
> p. 11   Gabriel S. Santos (ssantos.gabriel AT gmail.com). Distribuição e
> conservação do gavião-ripina (*Harpagus bidentatus*) (Accipitridae) no
> Espírito Santo, Brasil.
>
> p. 18   Cássio Cardoso Pereira (santosdangelo AT gmail.com), Fernanda de
> Fátima Santos Soares, Rúbia Santos Fonseca & Santos D’Ângelo Neto.
> Frugivoria e dispersão por aves das sementes de *Erythroxylum suberosum*
> A.St.-Hil. (Erythroxylaceae) no Cerrado brasileiro.
>
> p. 21   Michael Bruno (michaelbrunobio AT hotmail.com) & Sônia Aparecida
> Talamoni. Predação de *Artibeus lituratus *e *Artibeus planirostris 
*(Chiroptera: 

> Phyllostomidae) por *Asio clamator* (Strigiformes: Strigidae) em redes de
> neblina.
>
> p. 22   Francisco Mallet-Rodrigues (fmallet AT bol.com.br) & Simone
> Carvalho(. Registro de mutação isabel no anu-branco *Guira guira 
*(Cuculiformes: 

> Cuculidae).
>
> p. 23   Erli Schneider Costa (costaerli AT gmail.com), Adriana Rodrigues de
> Lira Pessôa, Juliana Silva Souza, Moacir Silva, João Paulo Machado Torres,
> Larissa Schmauder Teixeira da Cunha & Maria Alice S. Alves. Expansion of
> reproductive site of *Phalacrocorax atriceps* King, 1828
> (Phalacrocoracidae) in Admiralty Bay, King George Island, South Shetland
> Archipelago.
>
> P. 26   Fernando C. Straube & José Fernando Pacheco. Efemérides
> Biográficas da Ornitologia Brasileira (janeiro-fevereiro).
>
>
> *AOONLINE*Alexandre Luis Silva Teixeira & Flavio de Barros Molina. Coleção
> ornitológica em exposição do Museu de História Natural Professor Antonio
> Pergola, Atibaia, São Paulo .
>
> Bianca P. Vieira. Aves no Museu Homem do Sambaqui, Florianópolis, sul do
> Brasil .
>
> Maycon Ailton de Rezende, Marcelo Ferreira de Vasconcelos, Thiago Oliveira
> e Almeida & Thiago de Oliveira Souza.  Levantamento ornitológico do
> município de Carandaí, Minas Gerais, Brasil
> .
>
Subject: Atualidades Ornitolgicas N 182 Nov/Dec 2014
From: Jeremy Minns <jeremyminns AT UOL.COM.BR>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 11:31:41 -0200
p. 4    Llian Mariana Costa 
(lilian.mcosta AT gmail.com), Guilherme Henrique 
Silva de Freitas & Marcos Rodrigues. Ninho de ema 
Rhea americana em eucaliptal e comportamento de defesa do macho.

p. 8    Cristiane da Silva Monte 
(cris.s.monte AT gmail.com), Alysson Guedes 
Coutinho, Ricardo S. Rosa & Alan Loures-Ribeiro. 
Utilizao de materiais artificiais na construo 
do ninho de Pitangus sulphuratus (Linnaeus, 
1766): um estudo de caso no estado da Paraba, Brasil.

p. 11   Gabriel S. Santos 
(ssantos.gabriel AT gmail.com). Distribuio e 
conservao do gavio-ripina (Harpagus 
bidentatus) (Accipitridae) no Esprito Santo, Brasil.

p. 18   Cssio Cardoso Pereira 
(santosdangelo AT gmail.com), Fernanda de Ftima 
Santos Soares, Rbia Santos Fonseca & Santos 
Dngelo Neto. Frugivoria e disperso por aves 
das sementes de Erythroxylum suberosum A.St.-Hil. 
(Erythroxylaceae) no Cerrado brasileiro.

p. 21   Michael Bruno 
(michaelbrunobio AT hotmail.com) & Snia Aparecida 
Talamoni. Predao de Artibeus lituratus e 
Artibeus planirostris (Chiroptera: 
Phyllostomidae) por Asio clamator (Strigiformes: 
Strigidae) em redes de neblina.

p. 22   Francisco Mallet-Rodrigues 
(fmallet AT bol.com.br) & Simone Carvalho(. Registro 
de mutao isabel no anu-branco Guira guira (Cuculiformes: Cuculidae).

p. 23   Erli Schneider Costa 
(costaerli AT gmail.com), Adriana Rodrigues de Lira 
Pessa, Juliana Silva Souza, Moacir Silva, Joo 
Paulo Machado Torres, Larissa Schmauder Teixeira 
da Cunha & Maria Alice S. Alves. Expansion of 
reproductive site of Phalacrocorax atriceps King, 
1828 (Phalacrocoracidae) in Admiralty Bay, King 
George Island, South Shetland Archipelago.

P. 26   Fernando C. Straube & Jos Fernando 
Pacheco. Efemrides Biogrficas da Ornitologia Brasileira (janeiro-fevereiro).

AOONLINE
Alexandre Luis Silva Teixeira & Flavio de Barros 
Molina. 
Coleo 
ornitolgica em exposio do Museu de Histria 
Natural Professor Antonio Pergola, Atibaia, So Paulo.

Bianca P. Vieira. 
Aves 
no Museu Homem do Sambaqui, Florianpolis, sul do Brasil.

Maycon Ailton de Rezende, Marcelo Ferreira de 
Vasconcelos, Thiago Oliveira e Almeida & Thiago 
de Oliveira 
Souza. 
Levantamento 
ornitolgico do municpio de Caranda, Minas Gerais, Brasil. 
Subject: NEO-LIT: Journal of Biogeography
From: Huw Lloyd <H.Lloyd AT MMU.AC.UK>
Date: Fri, 30 Jan 2015 12:33:14 +0000
One Early View article of interest:

Benham, P. M., Cuervo, A. M., McGuire, J. A., Witt, C. C. (2014), Biogeography 
of the Andean metaltail hummingbirds: contrasting evolutionary histories of 
tree line and habitat-generalist clades. Journal of Biogeography. doi: 
10.1111/jbi.12452 


Email: E-mail: benham2 AT illinois.edu

Aim
To assess geographical and temporal patterns of diversification in Metallura 
hummingbirds, particularly with respect to topographical barriers and climatic 
variation between different populations. 


Location
Tropical Andes.

Methods
We estimated a multilocus phylogeny for all nine species of Metallura and 
evaluated phylogeographical patterns within Metallura tyrianthina using 
mitochondrial DNA sequences from across its range (n = 192). We tested 
mechanisms of diversification using climatic classification of sampling sites, 
coalescent-based dating, lineages-through-time plots and dispersal-vicariance 
analysis. 


Results
Metallura consists of two main clades: (1) the tree line specialists in the M. 
aeneocauda superspecies; and (2) a habitat-generalist clade that includes M. 
tyrianthina and M. iracunda. Metallura phoebe was recovered as sister to the 
tree line clade in some analyses. In both clades, there was marked genetic 
structure across topographical barriers and almost no structure between 
climatically distinct regions in the absence of barriers. The tree line clade 
exhibited deeper divergences in the Central Andes than elsewhere, and a 
south-to-north history of diversification, whereas the habitat-generalist clade 
showed deeper divergences in the Northern Andes and a history of southward 
expansion. A pure-birth model explained the steady net rate of diversification 
of Metallura hummingbirds through the Pliocene and the Pleistocene. 


Main conclusions
Isolation across topographical barriers best explained the genetic structure in 
M. tyrianthina. The two Metallura clades expanded from opposite ends of the 
Andes, leading to asynchronous divergence across common topographical barriers. 
Cycles of expansion followed by isolation may explain the preponderance of 
idiosyncratic area relationships that are typical of Andean clades. Geoclimatic 
dynamism during the Pleistocene caused Metallura and other Andean bird clades 
to undergo radical range shifts, including dispersal across topographical 
barriers, that became key to their diversification. 



Dr Huw Lloyd
Lecturer in Wildlife Ecology
Division of Biology and Conservation Ecology
School of Science and Environment
Manchester Metropolitan University
Chester Street, Manchester,
United Kingdom, M1 5GD
Telephone: +44161 247 1194
Email: h.lloyd AT mmu.ac.uk

Website: Conservation, Evolution and Behaviour Research Group
http://www.ceerec.mmu.ac.uk/ceb/

Office Hours: Wednesday 11am-12.30pm & Thursday 10am-11.30am

"Before acting on this email or opening any attachments you should read the 
Manchester Metropolitan University email disclaimer available on its website 
http://www.mmu.ac.uk/emaildisclaimer " 
Subject: NEOLIT "Behavior"
From: marcelo araya <marceloa27 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 28 Jan 2015 15:14:08 -0700
Hi all,

Some papers on Neotropical birds from “Behaviour” I missed from 2014:


Masaru, H., Emi, A., Manioru, W., & Masahiko, N. (2014). Colourful males
hold high quality territories but exhibit reduced paternal care in barn
swallows. Behaviour, 151(5), 591-612

The European barn swallow, Hirundo rustica rustica, is a model system of
female mate choice for indirect benefits. Its long tail, which is the
target of female mate choice, is positively related to the genetic quality
of males, whereas direct benefits in terms of territory quality and
paternal care are unimportant in the choice of long-tailed males. However,
the situation may differ in other subspecies where male ornaments other
than tail length are elaborate and appear to be the main target of female
choice. Here we studied whether throat colouration, a sexually selected
trait, provides direct benefits in terms of territory quality and parental
care in a population of Japanese barn swallows, H. r. gutturalis, which
have short tails and large throat patches. We compared dyads of males
occupying neighbouring territories to study the relationship between male
ornamentation and territory quality in our sparse population. Males with
higher quality territories had more colourful throat patches than males
with lower quality territories, indicating a positive relationship between
male throat colouration and the quality of their territory. In contrast,
male feeding rate decreased with increasing colourfulness of male throat
patch without confounding with female feeding rate. These results are
consistent with previous studies showing a positive association between
plumage colouration and testosterone levels. The trade-off between the two
direct benefits of mate choice, i.e., territory quality and paternal care,
can explain sexual selection for colourful throat patches rather than long
tails in our sparse outdoor population, a typical breeding habitat in
Japan, whereas it predicts a reverse pattern in dense indoor populations as
found in Europe.

email: perorobomusadiobe AT gmail.com


Grace, J. K., & Anderson, D. J. (2014). Personality correlates with
contextual plasticity in a free-living, long-lived seabird. *Behaviour*,
*151*(9), 1281-1311

Despite a rapid increase in animal personality research, critical gaps
remain. We have little knowledge of the long-term (as opposed to
short-term) consistency of personality and the relationships between
personality and behavioural flexibility in wild, free-living animals. This
study investigates personality (i.e., consistent inter-individual
differences in behaviour) and contextual plasticity (i.e., plasticity in
behaviour between contexts) of these traits in the Nazca booby (Sula
granti), a long-lived, free-living seabird. We tested birds for personality
in the field, during incubation, using a human intruder test, two novel
object tests, and a social stimulus test (mirror), and determined
repeatability of behavioural traits both within-season (short-term) and
between several years (long-term). We found high short- and long-term
repeatability of aggressive and anxietyrelated behaviours when confronted
with a nest intruder and novel objects, but lower repeatability during
social stimulation. Contextual plasticity was highly repeatable across
years for aggressive behaviours, and low for anxiety-related behaviours.
Plasticity did not correlate across behaviours into a 'meta-personality'
trait. Contextual plasticity in behavioural traits was highly correlated
with the expression of those traits, suggesting that individuals are able
to both react strongly and modify their behaviour depending on context,
perhaps due to consistent differences in individual quality. Model
selection exercises using structural equation models evaluated the
relationships between personality factors, indicating a behavioural
syndrome in which anxiety- or agitation-related behaviours covary strongly
and positively, and both covary weakly and negatively with aggression.

gracjk7 AT wfu.edu




Marcelo Araya-Salas
Ph.D. Candidate
Wright Behavior Lab
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Program
New Mexico State University
http://marceloarayasalas.weebly.com
Subject: NEOLIT Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology
From: marcelo araya <marceloa27 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 18:44:20 -0600
Hi all,

Some papers from “Behavioural Ecology and Sociobiology” from 2014 that I
have not reported.



Grunst, Andrea S., and Melissa L. Grunst. "Multiple sexual pigments,
assortative social pairing, and genetic paternity in the yellow warbler
(Setophaga petechia)." *Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology* 68.9 (2014):
1451-1463.

In socially monogamous species, extra-pair paternity may increase the
reproductive success of highly ornamented males, mediating the evolution of
sexual ornaments. However, ornaments may also attract social mates, and a
tradeoff between extra-pair paternity (EPP) and within-pair paternity (WPP)
may complicate mating strategies. Further, in many socially monogamous
species, females are also ornamented, and the relationship between female
ornamentation and patterns of EPP has been neglected. We investigated the
patterns of genetic paternity with respect to carotenoid- and melanin-based
pigmentation in yellow warblers (*Setophaga petechia*) of both sexes. We
asked whether males face tradeoffs between EPP and WPP, how paternity
patterns relate to carotenoid- versus melanin-based pigmentation, and
whether less EPP occurs in broods when males and females are assortatively
paired. Males faced a tradeoff between EPP and WPP. Moreover, non-additive
relationships existed between paternity patterns and the two pigment types
in both sexes. Males with high melanin coverage but dull carotenoid
pigmentation achieved EPP but lost WPP, whereas males with high levels of
both pigment types had high WPP but gained little EPP. A parallel pattern
occurred in females. Warblers paired assortatively by pigmentation and EPP
was less common in broods when the sexes were assortatively paired by
carotenoid pigmentation. Results suggest that the most colorful birds
obtain high quality social mates and advance reproductive success through
WPP, show that correlations can arise between female ornamentation and
patterns of EPP, and also uniquely suggest that social pairing patterns may
influence extra-pair mating strategies.

email: agrun001 AT ucr.edu



Beauchamp, Guy. "A field investigation of scrounging in semipalmated
sandpipers." *Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology* 68.9 (2014): 1473-1479.

Animals that forage in groups can produce their own food patches or
scrounge the food discoveries of their companions. Mean tactic payoffs are
expected to be the same at equilibrium for phenotypically equal foragers.
Scrounging is also typically viewed as a risk-averse foraging strategy that
provides a more even food intake rate over time. The occurrence of
scrounging and the payoffs from different foraging modes have rarely been
investigated in the field. Over two field seasons, I examined patch sharing
in semipalmated sandpipers (*Calidris pusilla*) foraging on minute food
items at the surface of the substrate. Birds could find patches on their
own, a producing event, or join the food patches discovered by others, a
scrounging event. I found that the average search time per patch did not
differ between producing and scrounging but that the average time spent
exploiting a patch was reduced nearly by half when scrounging. As a result,
the proportion of time spent exploiting a patch, a measure of foraging
payoffs, was significantly lower when scrounging. The variance in payoffs
was similar for producing and scrounging. When producing their own patches,
individuals that scrounged spent the same proportion of time exploiting a
patch as those that only produced. However, within the same individuals,
the search time for a scrounged patch was longer than the search time for a
produced patch. The results show unequal payoffs for producing and
scrounging in this system and suggest that low success in finding patches
elicited scrounging.

email: beauchamp AT umontreal.ca



Sicsú, Paula, et al. "Here comes the sun: multimodal displays are
associated with sunlight incidence." *Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology*
67.10 (2013): 1633-1642.

Conspicuousness of courtship signals in animals likely evolved to maximize
mate attraction while minimizing predator detection. It is assumed, though
largely unknown, that environmental and luminosity conditions affect the
detectability of ornaments and motor displays and could thus strongly
influence behavior. We combined visual models and behavioral observations
to test whether the multimodal display of the blue-black grassquit (*Volatinia
jacarina*) is influenced by environmental conditions, predicting that males
should display more often in moments with high sunlight incidence upon
their bodies. By displaying in such a context-dependent fashion, males
would be able to maximize conspicuousness of their iridescent blue-black
plumage and avoid displaying continuously, since the latter would involve
higher energetic investment. We recorded the rates of both complete
displays (leap with singing) as well as incomplete ones (singing while
perched) for males during repeated 30-min focal observations in varying
environmental situations in the field. We found that when bathed directly
in sunlight, males increased their rates of displays, tending to exhibit
more complete rather than incomplete displays in this condition and
suggesting a potential trade-off between display types. Our results suggest
that animals may adjust the timing and precise location of signal activity
to improve the efficiency or likelihood of detection of some signal
elements.

email: rhfmacedo AT unb.br



Yoon, Jongmin, et al. "Male's return rate, rather than territory fidelity
and breeding dispersal, explains geographic variation in song sharing in
two populations of an oscine passerine (Oreothlypis celata)." *Behavioral
Ecology and Sociobiology* 67.10 (2013): 1691-1697.


Males of some oscine passerines learn and share songs of neighboring males.
This process can lead to the formation of song pattern neighborhoods or
microhabitat song dialects. The degree to which song sharing occurs between
populations and the spatial scale over which neighboring males share songs,
however, can vary widely, and interpopulation comparisons have suggested
that song sharing is more common in residents than in migrants. Here, we
examine two populations of the orange-crowned warbler (*Oreothlypis celata*)
to quantify patterns of song sharing at the northern (long-distance
migrant) and southern (short-distance migrant) edges of the breeding
distribution and to test if return rate, territory fidelity, and breeding
dispersal explain the patterns found in the two populations. The southern
population (*O. celata sordida* breeding on Santa Catalina Island,
California; 33°N) had a higher annual return rate to their territories and
exhibited higher song sharing in neighborhoods than their counterparts (*O.
celata celata* breeding in Fairbanks, Alaska; 64°N). Year-to-year patterns
of territory fidelity and breeding dispersal distances were similar between
populations. Our results suggest that if migratory distance generally
covaries with the proportion of returning males, this could explain
different levels of song sharing between the short- and long-distance
migrants

email: cameron.ghalambor AT colostate.edu


Lessard, Andréanne, et al. "Individual and environmental determinants of
reproductive success in male tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)." *Behavioral
Ecology and Sociobiology* 68.5 (2014): 733-742.

Evaluating the contribution of individual and environmental determinants of
reproductive success is essential to improve our understanding of sexual
selection. In socially monogamous bird species with high rates of extrapair
paternity, traits or environmental contexts affecting the number of
within-pair young (WPY) produced by males can differ from those affecting
the number of extrapair young fathered (EPY). Here, we use a 4-year dataset
collected in contrasted environments to assess the factors affecting male
reproductive success in tree swallows (*Tachycineta bicolor*), a species
showing high levels of extrapair paternity. Our analyses revealed that the
number of WPY was higher under better environmental conditions, while the
number of EPY was mainly related to male characteristics. Males nesting in
more intensive agricultural areas had fewer WPY produced and a lower
reproductive success. Also, males breeding earlier in the season had more
WPY. The presence of parasites reduced males’ reproductive success, mainly
by reducing the number of EPY. The influence of male phenotype varied
according to population density: Tarsus length variation had a greater
effect on reproductive success at low population density than at high
density, while wing length was also positively related to the number of
EPY, more so at high than at low density. Altogether, our results suggest a
complex interplay between individual and environmental determinants of
reproductive success and imply that sexual selection dynamics varies
depending on environmental contexts.

email: dany.garant AT usherbrooke.ca



Klauke, Nadine, et al. "Food allocation rules vary with age and experience
in a cooperatively breeding parrot." *Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology*
68.6 (2014): 1037-1047.

Although it is known that parents can differ in their optimal resource
allocation to offspring in size-structured broods, the mechanisms
determining differences in allocation rules of carers are not yet
clarified. In cooperatively breeding species, breeders and non-reproductive
helpers often differ in their fitness payoffs of providing care and in
their breeding experience. Cooperative breeders thus provide an appropriate
system to examine two hypotheses originally proposed to explain differences
in food allocation among parents: (i) food allocation between carers
differs because of the distinct cost-benefit ratio of selective feeding (
*i.e.* breeders and helpers are expected to differ in food allocation) and
(ii) carers differ in their ability to feed selectively (*i.e.* differences
in food allocation are expected between experienced adults and
inexperienced yearlings). We compared feeding rates with which breeders,
old helpers and yearling helpers provisioned nestlings of different
hatching rank. The influence of experience upon food allocation was further
assessed by comparing food allocation of yearlings early and late during
nesting. We show that allocation rules differ between age classes because
breeders and old helpers fed the youngest chicks most, whereas yearlings
showed the opposite pattern. The role of experience was supported by the
fact that yearlings adjusted food allocation to that observed in
experienced adults during the breeding season. We thus suggest that food
allocation in El Oro parakeets depends either on differential skills of
adults to transfer food to the youngest chick or on their ability to
recognize nestling needs.

email: nadine.klauke AT biologie.uni-freiburg.de



Quinard, Aurélie, François-Xavier Dechaume-Moncharmont, and Frank Cézilly.
"Pairing patterns in relation to body size, genetic similarity and
multilocus heterozygosity in a tropical monogamous bird species." *Behavioral
Ecology and Sociobiology* 68.10 (2014): 1723-1731.

The relative influence of genetic and phenotypic quality on pairing status
and mating patterns in socially monogamous species remains poorly
documented. We studied social status and pairing patterns in relation to
genetic similarity and multilocus heterozygosity (MLH) estimates from 11
microsatellite markers, and both tarsus length and wing chord (as a measure
of competitive ability in territorial defence) in a socially monogamous
tropical bird species where individuals defend territories year-round,
alone or in pairs, the Zenaida dove, *Zenaida aurita*. Tarsus length and
wing chord did not differ between unpaired territorial birds and paired
ones in either sex, whereas paired females, but not paired males, tended to
be more heterozygous than unpaired ones. Among 84 pairs, we found no
evidence for assortative mating for tarsus length, wing chord, MLH or
genetic similarity. However, within pairs, male wing chord was positively
related to female MLH and female tarsus length was positively related to
male MLH, with no evidence for local effects, suggesting assortative mating
by individual quality. Although the observed pattern of mating in Zenaida
doves may be the product of mutual mate choice, further assessment of this
hypothesis requires direct investigation of both mating preference in each
sex and lifetime reproductive success in relation to body size and MLH.

frank.cezilly AT u-bourgogne.fr



Ramos, Alejandra G., et al. "Interactive effects of male and female age on
extra-pair paternity in a socially monogamous seabird." *Behavioral Ecology
and Sociobiology* 68.10 (2014): 1603-1609.

Females sometimes obtain older sires for their offspring through extra-pair
interactions, but how female age influences paternity is largely unexplored
and interactive effects across the age span of both sexes have not been
analyzed. To test whether female choice of sire age varies with female age
in the blue-footed booby (*Sula nebouxii*), we examined associations
between ages of both partners and the probability of extra-pair paternity
(EPP) in 350 broods of parents up to 22 years old in a single breeding
season. Extra-pair paternity enables a female to select an alternative sire
for her offspring and could function to avoid or achieve particular
combinations of parental ages. A male age × female age interaction revealed
that in young females (≤4 years), EPP decreased with increasing age of the
social partner, whereas in old females (≥8 years), it increased. Moreover,
sires of extra-pair (EP) chicks of young females paired to young males were
on average 6.33 years older than the females’ social partners. Since female
boobies control copulatory access, this pattern could imply that young
females choose old sires for their proven genetic quality and that old
females avoid very old males because matings with them may risk infertility
or genetic defects in offspring. Taking female age into account and
observing across the whole age span may be necessary for understanding
female age-based mate choice.

ramos.alejndra AT gmail.com



Bradley, R. J., et al. "Patterns and ecological predictors of age-related
performance in female North American barn swallows, Hirundo rustica
erythrogaster." *Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology* 68.11 (2014):
1883-1892.

Life history theory describes the optimization of important trade-offs
within an individual’s lifetime and predicts that an individual’s
reproductive performance (RP) will improve up until a point of senescence.
Despite abundant evidence for this pattern, relatively few studies consider
the mechanisms associated with age-related improvements in RP. In this
study, we aimed to describe patterns of age-related RP (seasonal fledgling
production) in female North American barn swallows (*Hirundo rustica
erythrogaster*) using a longitudinal data set to test multiple hypotheses
about the social, morphological, and ecological factors underlying this
prominent life history pattern. To address these objectives, we used
generalized linear mixed models in a three-step series of analyses in which
we assessed (1) patterns of female age-related RP; (2) the influence of age
on changes in social, morphological, and ecological factors; and (3)
whether the changes in RP were concomitant with changes in these factors.
We found that (1) females showed patterns of age-related reproduction, in
which performance increased in the first 2 years of breeding and decreased
thereafter, (2) female tail streamer length increased and the extent of
breast coloration increased then decreased significantly with age, and (3)
changes in morphological traits did not covary with changes in reproductive
performance over time. Our within-individual results highlight the
importance of considering explicit links between morphology and
reproductive performance that are not easily captured by population-level
analyses.

email:rbradley108 AT gmail.com


English, Willow B., et al. "Sex ratio varies with egg investment in the
red-necked phalarope (Phalaropus lobatus)." *Behavioral Ecology and
Sociobiology* 68.12 (2014): 1939-1949.

Fisher’s sex ratio theory predicts that on average parents should allocate
resources equally to the production of males and females. However, when the
cost/benefit ratio for producing males versus females differs, the theory
predicts that parents may bias production, typically through
underproduction of the sex with greater variation in fitness. We tested
theoretical predictions in the red-necked phalarope, a polyandrous
shorebird with sex-role reversal. Since females are larger and therefore
potentially more expensive to produce and may have greater variation in
reproductive success, we predicted from Fisher’s hypothesis a male bias in
population embryonic sex ratio, and from sex allocation theory, female
biases in the clutches of females allocating more resources to
reproduction. We measured eggs and chicks and sexed 535 offspring from 163
clutches laid over 6 years at two sites in Alaska. The embryonic sex ratio
of 51.1 M:48.9 F did not vary from parity. Clutch sex ratio (% male) was
positively correlated with clutch mean egg size, opposite to our
prediction. Within clutches, however, egg size did not differ by sex. Male
phalarope fitness may be more variable than previously thought, and/or
differential investment in eggs may affect the within-sex fitness of males
more than females. Eggs producing males were less dense than those
producing females, possibly indicating they contained more yolk relative to
albumen. Albumen contributes to chick structural size, while yolk supports
survivorship after hatch. Sex-specific chick growth strategies may affect
egg size and allocation patterns by female phalaropes and other birds.

dlank AT sfu.ca

Marcelo Araya-Salas
Ph.D. Candidate
Wright Behavior Lab
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology Program
New Mexico State University
http://marceloarayasalas.weebly.com
Subject: NEO-LIT: Environmental Conservation
From: Huw Lloyd <H.Lloyd AT MMU.AC.UK>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 13:15:11 +0000
Nothing specific to Neotropical birds published in 2014 - plenty of papers on 
environmental management/ecosystem services etc 


Dr Huw Lloyd
Lecturer in Wildlife Ecology
Division of Biology and Conservation Ecology
School of Science and Environment
Manchester Metropolitan University
Chester Street, Manchester,
United Kingdom, M1 5GD
Telephone: +44161 247 1194
Email: h.lloyd AT mmu.ac.uk

Website: Conservation, Evolution and Behaviour Research Group
http://www.ceerec.mmu.ac.uk/ceb/

Office Hours: Wednesday 11am-12.30pm & Thursday 10am-11.30am

"Before acting on this email or opening any attachments you should read the 
Manchester Metropolitan University email disclaimer available on its website 
http://www.mmu.ac.uk/emaildisclaimer " 
Subject: NEO-LIT: Biodiversity and Conservation
From: Huw Lloyd <H.Lloyd AT MMU.AC.UK>
Date: Mon, 26 Jan 2015 13:09:22 +0000
One paper of interest from Feb 2015 issue

Ferrer-Sanchez, Y. & Rodriguez-Estrella, R. (2015). Man-made environments 
relationships with island raptors: endemics do not cope with habitat changes, 
the case of the island of Cuba. Biodiversity and Conservation 24 (2): 407-425 

Email: estrella AT cibnor.mx

Abstract: Several studies conducted in neotropical islands have found that the 
intensity of human activity has altered the original structure and richness of 
bird communities, strongly affecting endemic species. Despite these effects, 
studies are limited, and lacking for raptors, in contrast to temperate and 
continental regions. During breeding and non-breeding seasons of 2012, roadside 
surveys and point counts were conducted in natural and human-transformed areas 
of the island of Cuba to determine whether or not raptors from an island show a 
pattern of ecological response to human activity similar to those observed in 
continental studies. Raptors showed strong variation in relation to habitat 
transformations, with lower richness, abundance, and density in the more 
extensively transformed areas. A total of 11 species was recorded, mostly in 
natural areas. Similar numbers of species were observed in coastal vegetation 
and cattle pasture habitat types within each zone. Nine species were detected 
in agriculture, while ten were found in forest habitat. A gradient of 
species-habitat was identified: Specialists/endemics tend to occur in natural 
areas, "intermediate species" in moderately modified areas and generalists in 
heavily modified areas. Generalists had higher abundances in anthropogenic 
areas, whereas specialists were found only in natural areas. Under insular 
conditions, land use changes can pose major threats for endemic and specialist 
raptors, seriously compromising their conservation. Endemic raptors do not cope 
well with habitat changes on the island, thus a rapid process of species 
impoverishment might be expected. Establishing a conservation program in Cuba 
is urgently needed. 



Dr Huw Lloyd
Lecturer in Wildlife Ecology
Division of Biology and Conservation Ecology
School of Science and Environment
Manchester Metropolitan University
Chester Street, Manchester,
United Kingdom, M1 5GD
Telephone: +44161 247 1194
Email: h.lloyd AT mmu.ac.uk

Website: Conservation, Evolution and Behaviour Research Group
http://www.ceerec.mmu.ac.uk/ceb/

Office Hours: Wednesday 11am-12.30pm & Thursday 10am-11.30am

"Before acting on this email or opening any attachments you should read the 
Manchester Metropolitan University email disclaimer available on its website 
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Subject: NEOLIT: Zootaxa 3914 (1)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Sun, 25 Jan 2015 10:38:21 -0500
Neoorners,



One paper in Zootaxa 3914 (1).



Manuel A. Plenge

Lima, Peru



Raposo, Marcos A.  José G. Tello, Edward C. Dickinson, and Guilherme R. R.
Brito  2015.  Remarks on the name *Cercomacra* Sclater, 1858 (Aves:
Thamnophilidae) and its type species.  3914*: *94-96.

E-mail: grrbrito AT yahoo.com.br

From the text: A recent molecular phylogeny of Cercomacra Sclater, 1858
found the genus to be polyphyletic (Tello et al. 2014). Two non-sister
clades in putative Cercomacra were uncovered: Cercomacra sensu stricto,
including Cercomacra manu Fitzpatrick & Willard, 1990, C. brasiliana
Hellmayr, 1905, C. cinerascens (Sclater, 1857), C. melanaria (Ménétries,
1835), C. ferdinandi Snethlage, 1928, C. carbonaria Sclater & Salvin, 1873
and C. nigricans Sclater, 1858; and Cercomacroides Tello & Raposo, 2014,
including Cercomacroides nigrescens (Cabanis & Heine, 1859), C. laeta
(Todd, 1920), C. parkeri (Graves, 1997), C. tyrannina (Sclater, 1855) and
C. serva (Sclater, 1858). This split required a prior re-examination of the
apparently difficult facts surrounding the name of the type species of
Cercomacra to ensure that the appropriate group would retain that name
leaving the balance to the new genus-group name, *Cercomacroides*.
Subject: NEOLIT: Molecular Biology and Evolution
From: Christopher Witt <cwitt AT UNM.EDU>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 21:36:20 +0000
Dear Neoorn,

Below are four papers from Molecular Biology and Evolution that I believe are 
likely to be of interest to Neotropical ornithologists and that have been 
published since my last update on this journal in February 2013. I provided 
links to pdf reprints for the first two papers. The best bet for obtaining pdf 
reprints of the 3rd and 4th papers would be to email the corresponding authors 
using the email address provided for each. 


best to all,

Chris Witt

--
Christopher C. Witt
Assoc. Prof. & Curator of Birds
Dept. of Biology & Museum of Southwestern Biology
University of New Mexico
Lab webpage: http://biology.unm.edu/Witt
Twitter:  AT MSBbirds
--

Gene turnover in the avian globin gene families and evolutionary changes in 
hemoglobin isoform expression 

Juan C. Opazo1,†, Federico G. Hoffmann2,3,†, Chandrasekhar Natarajan4, 
Christopher C. Witt5,6, Michael Berenbrink7 and Jay F. Storz4,* 

1Instituto de Ciencias Ambientales y Evolutivas, Facultad de Ciencias, 
Universidad Austral de Chile, Valdivia, Chile 

2Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Entomology, and Plant 
Pathology, Mississippi State University, Mississippi State, 39762, USA 

3Institute for Genomics, Biocomputing, and Biotechnology, Mississippi State 
University, Mississippi State, 39762, USA 

4School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 68588, USA 

5Department of Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 87131, USA
6Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, 
87131, USA 

7Institute of Integrative Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool, L69 7ZB, 
UK 

↵*Author for correspondence: Jay F. Storz, School of Biological Sciences, 
University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, 68588, USA, E-mail: 
jstorz2 AT unl.edu 

pdf available here: 
http://biology.unm.edu/Witt/pub_files/Opazo-etal-2014-MBE-Avian-globin-gene-family-evolution-expression-plus-Supplement.pdf 

Abstract
The apparent stasis in the evolution of avian chromosomes suggests that birds 
may have experienced relatively low rates of gene gain and loss in multigene 
families. To investigate this possibility and to explore the phenotypic 
consequences of variation in gene copy number, we examined evolutionary changes 
in the families of genes that encode the α- and β-type subunits of hemoglobin 
(Hb), the tetrameric α2β2 protein responsible for blood-O2 transport. A 
comparative genomic analysis of 52 bird species revealed that the size and 
membership composition of the α- and β-globin gene families have remained 
remarkably constant during ~100 million years of avian evolution. Most 
interspecific variation in gene content is attributable to multiple independent 
inactivations of the αD-globin gene, which encodes the α-chain subunit of a 
functionally distinct Hb isoform (HbD) that is expressed in both embryonic and 
definitive erythrocytes. Due to consistent differences in O2-binding properties 
between HbD and the major adult-expressed Hb isoform, HbA (which incorporates 
products of the αA-globin gene), recurrent losses of αD-globin contribute to 
among-species variation in blood-O2 affinity. Analysis of HbA/HbD expression 
levels in the red blood cells of 122 bird species revealed high variability 
among lineages and strong phylogenetic signal. In comparison with the 
homologous gene clusters in mammals, the low retention rate for 
lineage-specific gene duplicates in the avian globin gene clusters suggests 
that the developmental regulation of Hb synthesis in birds may be more highly 
conserved, with orthologous genes having similar stage-specific expression 
profiles and similar functional properties in disparate taxa. 


Integrating Evolutionary and Functional Tests of Adaptive Hypotheses: A Case 
Study of Altitudinal Differentiation in Hemoglobin Function in an Andean 
Sparrow, Zonotrichia capensis 

Zachary A. Cheviron*,1,2, Chandrasekhar Natarajan2, Joana Projecto-Garcia2, 
Douglas K. Eddy1, Jennifer Jones1, Matthew D. Carling3, Christopher C. Witt4,5, 
Hideaki Moriyama2, Roy E. Weber6, Angela Fago6 and Jay F. Storz*,2 

1Department of Animal Biology, School of Integrative Biology, University of 
Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 

2School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska, Lincoln
3Department of Zoology and Physiology, University of Wyoming
4Department of Biology, University of New Mexico
5Museum of Southwestern Biology, University of New Mexico
6Zoophysiology, Department of Bioscience, Aarhus University, Aarhus, Denmark
↵*Corresponding author: E-mail: 
cheviron AT illinois.edu; 
jstorz2 AT unl.edu. 

pdf available here: 
http://biology.unm.edu/Witt/pub_files/Cheviron-etal-2014-MBE-Andean_sparrow_hemoglobin-plus_supplements.pdf 

Abstract
In air-breathing vertebrates, the physiologically optimal blood-O2 affinity is 
jointly determined by the prevailing partial pressure of atmospheric O2, the 
efficacy of pulmonary O2 transfer, and internal metabolic demands. 
Consequently, genetic variation in the oxygenation properties of hemoglobin 
(Hb) may be subject to spatially varying selection in species with broad 
elevational distributions. Here we report the results of a combined functional 
and evolutionary analysis of Hb polymorphism in the rufous-collared sparrow 
(Zonotrichia capensis), a species that is continuously distributed across a 
steep elevational gradient on the Pacific slope of the Peruvian Andes. We 
integrated a population genomic analysis that included all postnatally 
expressed Hb genes with functional studies of naturally occurring Hb variants, 
as well as recombinant Hb (rHb) mutants that were engineered through 
site-directed mutagenesis. We identified three clinally varying amino acid 
polymorphisms: Two in the αA-globin gene, which encodes the α-chain subunits 
of the major HbA isoform, and one in the αD-globin gene, which encodes the 
α-chain subunits of the minor HbD isoform. We then constructed and 
experimentally tested single- and double-mutant rHbs representing each of the 
alternative αA-globin genotypes that predominate at different elevations. 
Although the locus-specific patterns of altitudinal differentiation suggested a 
history of spatially varying selection acting on Hb polymorphism, the 
experimental tests demonstrated that the observed amino acid mutations have no 
discernible effect on respiratory properties of the HbA or HbD isoforms. These 
results highlight the importance of experimentally validating the hypothesized 
effects of genetic changes in protein function to avoid the pitfalls of 
adaptive storytelling. 


Genomic Support for a Moa–Tinamou Clade and Adaptive Morphological 
Convergence in Flightless Ratites 

Allan J. Baker*,1,2, Oliver Haddrath1, John D. McPherson3 and Alison Cloutier2
1Department of Natural History, Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
2Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, 
Toronto, Ontario, Canada 

3Ontario Institute for Cancer Research, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
↵*Corresponding author: E-mail:  oliverh AT rom.on.ca
Abstract
One of the most startling discoveries in avian molecular phylogenetics is that 
the volant tinamous are embedded in the flightless ratites, but this topology 
remains controversial because recent morphological phylogenies place tinamous 
as the closest relative of a monophyletic ratite clade. Here, we integrate new 
phylogenomic sequences from 1,448 nuclear DNA loci totaling almost 1 million bp 
from the extinct little bush moa, Chilean tinamou, and emu with available 
sequences from ostrich, elegant crested tinamou, four neognaths, and the green 
anole. Phylogenetic analysis using standard homogeneous models and 
heterogeneous models robust to common topological artifacts recovered 
compelling support for ratite paraphyly with the little bush moa closest to 
tinamous within ratites. Ratite paraphyly was further corroborated by eight 
independent CR1 retroposon insertions. Analysis of morphological characters 
reinterpreted on a 27-gene paleognath topology indicates that many characters 
are convergent in the ratites, probably as the result of adaptation to a 
cursorial life style. 


Feather Development Genes and Associated Regulatory Innovation Predate the 
Origin of Dinosauria 

Craig B. Lowe1, Julia A. Clarke2, Allan J. Baker3, David Haussler4 and Scott V. 
Edwards*,5 

1Department of Developmental Biology and Howard Hughes Medical Institute, 
Stanford University, Stanford, CA 

2Department of Geological Sciences, University of Texas at Austin, Austin TX
3Department of Natural History, Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, and Department 
of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada 
(Deceased) 

4Center for Biomolecular Science and Engineering, University of California, 
Santa Cruz 

5Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Museum of Comparative 
Zoology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA 

↵*Corresponding author: 
sedwards AT fas.harvard.edu. 

Abstract
The evolution of avian feathers has recently been illuminated by fossils and 
the identification of genes involved in feather patterning and morphogenesis. 
However, molecular studies have focused mainly on protein-coding genes. Using 
comparative genomics and more than 600,000 conserved regulatory elements, we 
show that patterns of genome evolution in the vicinity of feather genes are 
consistent with a major role for regulatory innovation in the evolution of 
feathers. Rates of innovation at feather regulatory elements exhibit an 
extended period of innovation with peaks in the ancestors of amniotes and 
archosaurs. We estimate that 86% of such regulatory elements and 100% of the 
nonkeratin feather gene set were present prior to the origin of Dinosauria. On 
the branch leading to modern birds, we detect a strong signal of regulatory 
innovation near insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) 2 and 
IGFBP5, which have roles in body size reduction, and may represent a genomic 
signature for the miniaturization of dinosaurian body size preceding the origin 
of flight. 
Subject: NEOLIT: Revista de Biología Tropical 62 (2 & 4) & 63 (1)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 11:33:21 -0500
There was more text in a different format in Luis Sandoval’s e-mail. 
Apologies 

for this omission.



Manuel



*Vol 62. No. 4. 2014*

*Effect of temporal lakes on avifaunal composition at the Southeast of
Isthmus of Tehuantepec, Oaxaca, Mexico*

*Tamara Rioja-Paradela, Arturo Carrillo-Reyes, Eduardo Espinoza-Medinilla*

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v62i4.12994

*Abstract*

Oaxaca hosts one of the greatest biodiversity in México, occupying first
place in avian diversity compared to other regions of the country. However,
the area is undergoing serious problems such as high deforestation rates,
soil erosion and over exploitation and extinction of species. These factors
have all contributed to the current loss of biodiversity. Also, biological
inventories are still incomplete. One of the least explored sites is the
semiarid zone of Tehuantepec isthmus, around the locality of Santa Maria
del Mar, Oaxaca, México. The area includes floodable grasslands, mangrove
areas and dry forest, providing a range of potential habitats for different
species. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of temporal lakes on
spatial and temporal composition of the avifauna in Santa Maria del Mar, in
order to generate information regarding this group within the region and
the state, and to understand the importance of flood areas for resident and
transitory birds. We conducted 12 avifauna surveys between July 2006 and
June 2008, and established two transects of 2km length in each of four
habitat types (beach, grassland, dry forest, and mangrove). We found a
total of 75 species, corresponding to 16 orders and 30 families. Within an
area of 26km2, we significantly found 10.1% of the total number of bird
species recorded for the entire state, and 6.6% of the total reported in
Mexico. The families most represented were: Ardeidae, Laridae and
Scolopacidae. Over the entire study period, dry forest was the most diverse
habitat; followed by mangrove, grassland and the beach. Of all the species
recorded, 38.6% were found at the edge or in the temporal lakes. We found a
significant difference in species composition between seasons in the
grassland, but no difference in the other habitats. Our results showed a
significant effect of temporary lakes on avian diversity during the wet
season; it also demonstrated the importance of grassland conservation given
its relevance for presence of waterbirds. We suggested a continued and more
intense monitoring; and proposed the designation of the area as an
Important Conservation Bird Area (AICA).



*Vol 62. No 2. 2014*

*A distinctive avian assemblage (Aves: Passeriformes) in Western Darién,
Panama is uncovered through a disease surveillance program*

*Matthew J. Miller*

DOI:* http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v62i2.10493
 *

*Abstract*

Basic knowledge about the distribution of flora and fauna is lacking for
most tropical areas. Improving our knowledge of the tropical biota will
help address contemporary global problems, including emerging tropical
diseases. Less appreciated is the role that applied studies can have in
improving our understanding of basic biological patterns and processes in
the tropics. Here, I describe a novel avifauna assemblage uncovered in
Western Darién province in the Republic of Panama that was uncovered during
a vector-borne disease surveillance program. I compared the passerine bird
species composition at 16 sites using records from recent ornithological
expeditions sponsored by the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in
Central and Eastern Panama. Based on the results of a Mantel test,
geographic distance did not correlate with pairwise distinctiveness of
sites. Instead, based on an index of distinctiveness modified from the
Chao-Jaccard index, most sites were more or less similarly distinctive,
with one site, Aruza Abajo, significantly more distinctive than the rest. I
found that the distinctiveness of this site was due not only to the
presence of several rare and range-restricted taxa, but also to the absence
of taxa that are common elsewhere. This finding provides more evidence of
high species composition turnover (beta-diversity) in the Panamanian biota,
which appears to be driven by a combination of soil and climate differences
over narrow distances.
Subject: NEOLIT: Revista de Biología Tropical 62 (4) & 63 (1)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 11:12:44 -0500
For technical reasons Luis Sandoval cannot access NEOORN.  Herewith the
e-mail with his advice on the journal mentioned.

Manuel A. Plenge
Lima, Peru

Hello Neoorners
This is the list of paper for Revista de Biología Tropical volume 62 2014
and volume 63 2015. Papers can be downloaded here:
http://revistas.ucr.ac.cr/index.php/rbt/issue/archive
Vol 63, No 1. 2015
*Variación en el tamaño de los huevos en garzas (Aves: Ardeidae) que anidan
en la ciénaga de Birama, Cuba*
*Dennis Denis Ávila*

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v63i1.12993
*Abstract*
Las variaciones intranidada de la talla de los huevos de las aves responden
a numerosos factores ecológicos y de la historia evolutiva de las especies.
En las zancudas aunque se ha descrito una disminución de la talla con el
orden de puesta, los trabajos comparativos entre especies son escasos. En
este trabajo se describen los patrones de variación del tamaño de los
huevos de nueve especies de garzas (Aves: Ardeidae) nidificantes en la
ciénaga de Birama, Cuba. Los patrones se describen a partir de las
dimensiones de 3 142 huevos, pertenecientes a 1 875 nidos de *Butorides
virescens*, *Bubulcus ibis*, *Ardea alba*, *Nycticorax nycticorax*, *Nyctanassa
violacea* y cuatro especies de *Egretta*, tomados en la ciénaga de Birama,
Cuba, entre 1998 y 2006. Los huevos representaron entre el 4.9-10% del peso
adulto y tuvieron un coeficiente de variación del volumen entre el 6-9%. No
existió una relación general consistente entre especies entre el tamaño de
puesta y las dimensiones de los huevos. El volumen promedio del huevo
tiende a disminuir con el orden de puesta, pero no es estadísticamente
detectable en *Butorides* y *Bubulcus*. El último huevo fue entre un 0.2 y
un 15% menor que el primero, disminuyendo su volumen relativo con la talla
del primer huevo. La asimetría intranidada es menos marcada en *E. thula* y
prácticamente fluctuante alrededor de cero en *Bubulcus*. En general, la
talla del huevo solo puede predecir el orden de puesta para el último huevo
en nidadas mayores de dos con un 72.4% de confianza.

Vol 62. No. 4. 2014
*Application of the elliptic Fourier functions to the description of avian
egg shape*
*Dennis Denis Ávila*
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v62i4.12992
*Abstract*
Egg shape is difficult to quantify due to the lack of an exact formula to
describe its geometry. Here I described a simple algorithm to characterize
and compare egg shapes using Fourier functions. These functions can
delineate any closed contour and had been previously applied to describe
several biological objects. I described, step by step, the process of data
acquisition, processing and the use of the SHAPE software to extract
function coefficients in a study case. I compared egg shapes in three
birds’ species representing different reproductive strategies: Cuban
Parakeet (*Aratinga euops*), Royal Tern (*Thalasseus maximus*) and Cuban
Blackbird (*Dives atroviolaceus*). Using 73 digital pictures of eggs kept
in Cuban scientific collections, I calculated Fourier descriptors with 4,
6, 8, 16 and 20 harmonics. Descriptors were reduced by a Principal
Component Analysis and the scores of the eigenvalues that account for 90%
of variance were used in a Lineal Discriminant Function to analyze the
possibility to differentiate eggs according to its shapes. Using four
harmonics, the first five component accounted for 97% of shape variances;
more harmonics diluted the variance increasing to eight the number of
components needed to explain most of the variation. Convex polygons in the
discriminant space showed a clear separation between species, allowing
trustful discrimination (classification errors between 7-15%).
Misclassifications were related to specific egg shape variability between
species. In the study case, *A. euops* eggs were perfectly classified, but
for the other species, errors ranged from 5 to 29% of misclassifications,
in relation to the numbers or harmonics and components used. The proposed
algorithm, despite its apparent mathematical complexity, showed many
advantages to describe eggs shape allowing a deeper understanding of
factors related to this variable.


*Área de distribución geográfica potencial de las especies de aves
psitácidas de la Península de Yucatán, México*
*Alexis Herminio Plasencia Vázquez, Griselda Escalona Segura*
DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.15517/rbt.v62i4.13576
*Abstract*
La familia Psittacidae es una de las más amenazadas en México y los
hábitats donde se distribuyen desaparecen. En este estudio se caracterizó
la cobertura del suelo del área de distribución geográfica potencial de las
ocho especies de psitácidos presentes en la Península de Yucatán. Se
utilizó el algoritmo de Máxima Entropía (MaxEnt) y registros históricos de
las especies. Para validar externamente los modelos se utilizaron registros
de presencia y ausencia tomados en campo (2010-2012). Para caracterizar el
área de distribución se utilizó la carta de uso de suelo y vegetación Serie
IV de INEGI (2007-2010). Los modelos tuvieron un buen desempeño, de acuerdo
a los valores del área bajo la curva (AUC), que oscilaron entre 0.88-0.95
con los datos de entrenamiento y entre 0.82-0.91 con los de prueba. Se
localizó a la mayoría de las especies en los sitios donde los modelos
predecían presencia. Más del 76% del área de distribución geográfica
potencial de los psitácidos en la Península está ocupada por selva, excepto
para *Amazona oratrix*. La selva mediana subperennifolia es la mejor
representada en las áreas de distribución y de los usos de suelo el mejor
representado es el pecuario. La especies más afectadas dentro de la
Península son: *Amazona farinosa* y *A. oratrix*. La Reserva de la Biosfera
de Calakmul es la más importante para la protección de los psitácidos en la
Península. El conocimiento de las características de las áreas de
distribución es parte fundamental en el establecimiento de estrategias de
conservación de los psitácidos.
Subject: Cis and trans
From: Meena Madhav Haribal <mmh3 AT CORNELL.EDU>
Date: Fri, 23 Jan 2015 12:32:30 +0000
Chris wrote:

>> I'm aware of cis- and trans-Himalayan.  After hearing about the etymology
 of the Andean terms, I'm guessing the Himalayan ones are similarly rooted
 in a colonial past (?).<<<

 In this case is cis Himalayan Indian slopes or Chinese slopes? I bet it is 
Indian slopes as British (Europeans) considered is their side. For a German it 
would be Chinese side, at least that is closest to their side I suppose. 

 
And also it would be south and north of Himalaya and not east and west of the 
Himalaya. 


As chemist, I see molecules are different from land masses. They have 
substitutions on two adjacent carbon atoms either projecting in same direction 
or in opposite direction. So there is no confusion as to what is cis or trans. 
The isomers are also known as E (entgegen - going away) and Z (zusammen - 
together) isomers and that both E and Z are denoted in italiacs. 


So I agree with many that cis and trans terminology should be discarded to more 
understandable terms. 


Cheers
Meena

Meena Haribal
Boyce Thompson Institue
Ithaca NY 14850
42.429007,-76.47111
http://www.haribal.org/
http://meenaharibal.blogspot.com/
Ithaca area moths: https://plus.google.com/118047473426099383469/posts
Dragonfly book sample pages: http://www.haribal.org/dragonflies/samplebook.pdf




________________________________________
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: alanpp <alanpp AT BMI.NET>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 22:03:43 -0800
 

First, I have to apologize for the eye-wateringly bad font/style of
the presented material (features that were in no way evident as I put
material into my mailer). 

Second, I must clarify: When I used the
phrase "all the current and past avian names" -- I was in the grip of my
usual delusions of adequacy. In fact it applies ONLY to the period from
1758 until 1985 or so.. after that there is increasing likelihood that
there may be new names in synonomy I do not have in my dataset. 

Best,


Alan Peterson 

On 22.01.2015 21:14, alanpp wrote: 

> This horse is
now, I think, well whipped, and I add my support for avoiding _trans_-
and _cis_- as only confusion results. 
> 
> The discussion has been of
interest, and I can not refrain from adding a bit. 
> 
> The following
represent all the current and past avian names consisting of _trans_- or
_cis_- appended to a geographic token. (I do NOT include the huge number
of _transvaalensis_ like names for the obvious reason that that IS a
geographic region.) 
> 
> [The currently valid names will look a little
funny as they have the date, followed by the citation THEN the name and
author, but it is easy for meto produce them that way and I don't wish
to undertake the tedium of re-formatting them]. 
> 
> -trans names. 
>

> Current valid taxa (sorted by date of description)
> 
> 1855 PZS Pt23
no.285 p. 018 _Taraba major transandeanus_ (Sclater,PL)
> 1884
PZS["1883"] Pt4 p. 553 _Leptopogon superciliaris transandinus_ Berlepsch
& Taczanowski
> 1902 Orn.Monatsb. 10 no.006 p. 96 _Passer hispaniolensis
transcaspicus_ Tschusi
> 1906 Ibis p. 423 _Passer montanus
transcaucasicus_ Buturlin
> 1910 Mess.Orn. 1 no.003 p. 193 _Dendrocopos
syriacus transcaucasicus_ Buturlin
> 1916 Izv.Turk.Otd.Rus.Geogr.Obsht.
12 p. 228 _Fringilla coelebs transcaspia_ Zarudny
> 1951 Ark.Zool.(2) 1
p. 198 _Myrmotherula assimilis transamazonica_ Gyldenstolpe
> 1993
Russ.J.Orn. 2 no.003 p. 317 _Riparia diluta transbaykalica_ Goroshko
>

> Original combinations 
> 
> _Crypturellus variegatus transamazonicus_
Todd 1937
> _Dendrocopos major transcaspius Zarudny_ 1908
> _Dendrocopus
syriacus transcaucasicus_
> _Dryobates medius transcaucasicus_ Buturlin
1912
> _Lagopus mutus transbaicalicus_ Sserebrowsky 1926
> _Leptopogon
superciliaris transandinus_ Berlepsch & Taczanowski 1883
> _Monticola
cyanus transcaspicus_ Hartert
> _Motacilla alba transcaspica_ stresemann
1928
> _Myrmotherula assimilis transamazonicus_ Gyldenstolpe 1951
>
_Otocoris penicillata transcaspica_ Floricke 1898
> _Parus transcaspius_
Zarudny 1893
> _Passer hispaniolensis transcaspicus_ Tschudi 1902
>
_Passer montanus transcaucasicus_ Buturlin 1906
> _Philomela
transcaucasica_ Buturlin 1910
> _Phylloscopus borealis transbaicalicus_
Portenko 1939
> _Strix transatlantica_ Shaw 1809
> _Struthio
transcaucasicus_ Burchak-Abramovich & Vekua 1971
> _Tetraogallus
transcapasius_ Reichenow 1916
> _Thamnophilus transandeanus_ Sclater,PL
1855
> 
> cis - names
> 
> Current valid taxa
> 
> 1882 PZS Pt1 p. 025
_Cranioleuca curtata cisandina_ (Taczanowski)
> 1918
Bull.Am.Mus.Nat.Hist. 38 p. 295 _Junco hyemalis cismontanus_ Dwight
>
1919 Anz.Orn.Ges.Bayern Band1 no.001 p. 007 _Sitta europaea cisalpina_
Sachtleben
> 
> Original combinations
> 
> _Certhia familiaris
ciscaucasica_ Grote,H 1931 [Falco, xxvi, no.2 1930 (publishedJan., 1931)
p.22]
> _Cyanistes coeruleus ciscaucasicus_ Grote,H 1931 [Falco 26
no.2]
> _Erithacus rubecula ciscaucasicus_ Grote,H 1931
> _Fringilla
cisalpina_ Temminck 1820
> _Passer montanus ciscaucasicus_ Grote 1931
>
_Pyrgita cisalpina_ Brehm,CL 1831
> _Synallaxis cisandina_ Taczanowski
1882
> 
> As near as I can tell that constitutes the known universe of
cis- or trans- avian names (with the noted _transvaal_ exceptions as
well as all the "_transtiva_'s, _cisticola_'s, &c)
> 
> Best to all.
>

> Alan Peterson
> 
> On 22.01.2015 19:14, Alvaro Jaramillo wrote: 
>

>> I have not been following the discussion, but the Dark-eyed Junco
subspecies cismontanus comes to mind. It is east of the mountains in N
BC and Alberta. 
>> 
>> Alvaro 
>> 
>> Alvaro Jaramillo 
>> 
>>
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com 
>> 
>> www.alvarosadventures.com 
>> 
>>
FROM: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] ON BEHALF OF Chris Merkord
>> SENT:
Thursday, January 22, 2015 6:54 PM
>> TO: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
>>
SUBJECT: Re: [NEOORN-L] cis & trans 
>> 
>> Are there any other mountain
ranges in the world that have their own adjectives for describing
species distributions as being on one side or the other? 
>> 
>> I'm
aware of cis- and trans-Himalayan. After hearing about the etymology of
the Andean terms, I'm guessing the Himalayan ones are similarly rooted
in a colonial past (?). 
>> 
>> Also, after thinking about it, I now see
the relation between the biogeographic terms and the chemical ones. In
chemistry, cis-isomerism means two functional groups are on the same
side of a molecule, while trans- means two groups are on opposite sides
of a molecule. So in the biogeographical sense, I suppose someone might
consider a species' range as being on the "same" side of a mountain as
himself, or the opposite. Egocentrism at its finest! 
>> 
>> -- 
>> 
>>
Christopher L. Merkord, Ph.D. 
>> 
>> Postdoctoral Fellow, GSCE 
>> 
>>
South Dakota State University

 
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: alanpp <alanpp AT BMI.NET>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 21:14:24 -0800
 

This horse is now, I think, well whipped, and I add my support for
avoiding _trans_- and _cis_- as only confusion results. 

The discussion
has been of interest, and I can not refrain from adding a bit. 

The
following represent all the current and past avian names consisting of
_trans_- or _cis_- appended to a geographic token. (I do NOT include the
huge number of _transvaalensis_ like names for the obvious reason that
that IS a geographic region.) 

[The currently valid names will look a
little funny as they have the date, followed by the citation THEN the
name and author, but it is easy for meto produce them that way and I
don't wish to undertake the tedium of re-formatting them]. 

-trans
names. 

Current valid taxa (sorted by date of description)

1855 PZS
Pt23 no.285 p. 018 _Taraba major transandeanus_ (Sclater,PL)
1884
PZS["1883"] Pt4 p. 553 _Leptopogon superciliaris transandinus_ Berlepsch
& Taczanowski
1902 Orn.Monatsb. 10 no.006 p. 96 _Passer hispaniolensis
transcaspicus_ Tschusi
1906 Ibis p. 423 _Passer montanus
transcaucasicus_ Buturlin
1910 Mess.Orn. 1 no.003 p. 193 _Dendrocopos
syriacus transcaucasicus_ Buturlin
1916 Izv.Turk.Otd.Rus.Geogr.Obsht. 12
p. 228 _Fringilla coelebs transcaspia_ Zarudny
1951 Ark.Zool.(2) 1 p.
198 _Myrmotherula assimilis transamazonica_ Gyldenstolpe
1993
Russ.J.Orn. 2 no.003 p. 317 _Riparia diluta transbaykalica_
Goroshko

Original combinations 

_Crypturellus variegatus
transamazonicus_ Todd 1937
_Dendrocopos major transcaspius Zarudny_
1908
_Dendrocopus syriacus transcaucasicus_
_Dryobates medius
transcaucasicus_ Buturlin 1912
_Lagopus mutus transbaicalicus_
Sserebrowsky 1926
_Leptopogon superciliaris transandinus_ Berlepsch &
Taczanowski 1883
_Monticola cyanus transcaspicus_ Hartert
_Motacilla
alba transcaspica_ stresemann 1928
_Myrmotherula assimilis
transamazonicus_ Gyldenstolpe 1951
_Otocoris penicillata transcaspica_
Floricke 1898
_Parus transcaspius_ Zarudny 1893
_Passer hispaniolensis
transcaspicus_ Tschudi 1902
_Passer montanus transcaucasicus_ Buturlin
1906
_Philomela transcaucasica_ Buturlin 1910
_Phylloscopus borealis
transbaicalicus_ Portenko 1939
_Strix transatlantica_ Shaw
1809
_Struthio transcaucasicus_ Burchak-Abramovich & Vekua
1971
_Tetraogallus transcapasius_ Reichenow 1916
_Thamnophilus
transandeanus_ Sclater,PL 1855

cis - names

Current valid taxa

1882
PZS Pt1 p. 025 _Cranioleuca curtata cisandina_ (Taczanowski)
1918
Bull.Am.Mus.Nat.Hist. 38 p. 295 _Junco hyemalis cismontanus_ Dwight
1919
Anz.Orn.Ges.Bayern Band1 no.001 p. 007 _Sitta europaea cisalpina_
Sachtleben

Original combinations

_Certhia familiaris ciscaucasica_
Grote,H 1931 [Falco, xxvi, no.2 1930 (publishedJan., 1931)
p.22]
_Cyanistes coeruleus ciscaucasicus_ Grote,H 1931 [Falco 26
no.2]
_Erithacus rubecula ciscaucasicus_ Grote,H 1931
_Fringilla
cisalpina_ Temminck 1820
_Passer montanus ciscaucasicus_ Grote
1931
_Pyrgita cisalpina_ Brehm,CL 1831
_Synallaxis cisandina_
Taczanowski 1882

As near as I can tell that constitutes the known
universe of cis- or trans- avian names (with the noted _transvaal_
exceptions as well as all the "_transtiva_'s, _cisticola_'s, &c)

Best
to all.

Alan Peterson

On 22.01.2015 19:14, Alvaro Jaramillo wrote: 

>
I have not been following the discussion, but the Dark-eyed Junco
subspecies cismontanus comes to mind. It is east of the mountains in N
BC and Alberta. 
> 
> Alvaro 
> 
> Alvaro Jaramillo 
> 
>
alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com 
> 
> www.alvarosadventures.com 
> 
> FROM:
Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] ON BEHALF OF Chris Merkord
> SENT:
Thursday, January 22, 2015 6:54 PM
> TO: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
>
SUBJECT: Re: [NEOORN-L] cis & trans 
> 
> Are there any other mountain
ranges in the world that have their own adjectives for describing
species distributions as being on one side or the other? 
> 
> I'm aware
of cis- and trans-Himalayan. After hearing about the etymology of the
Andean terms, I'm guessing the Himalayan ones are similarly rooted in a
colonial past (?). 
> 
> Also, after thinking about it, I now see the
relation between the biogeographic terms and the chemical ones. In
chemistry, cis-isomerism means two functional groups are on the same
side of a molecule, while trans- means two groups are on opposite sides
of a molecule. So in the biogeographical sense, I suppose someone might
consider a species' range as being on the "same" side of a mountain as
himself, or the opposite. Egocentrism at its finest! 
> 
> -- 
> 
>
Christopher L. Merkord, Ph.D. 
> 
> Postdoctoral Fellow, GSCE 
> 
>
South Dakota State University

 
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: Alvaro Jaramillo <chucao AT COASTSIDE.NET>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 19:14:15 -0800
I have not been following the discussion, but the Dark-eyed Junco subspecies 
cismontanus comes to mind. It is east of the mountains in N BC and Alberta. 


 

Alvaro 

 

Alvaro Jaramillo

alvaro AT alvarosadventures.com

www.alvarosadventures.com

 

From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Chris Merkord 

Sent: Thursday, January 22, 2015 6:54 PM
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] cis & trans

 

Are there any other mountain ranges in the world that have their own adjectives 
for describing species distributions as being on one side or the other? 


 

I'm aware of cis- and trans-Himalayan. After hearing about the etymology of the 
Andean terms, I'm guessing the Himalayan ones are similarly rooted in a 
colonial past (?). 


 

Also, after thinking about it, I now see the relation between the biogeographic 
terms and the chemical ones. In chemistry, cis-isomerism means two functional 
groups are on the same side of a molecule, while trans- means two groups are on 
opposite sides of a molecule. So in the biogeographical sense, I suppose 
someone might consider a species' range as being on the "same" side of a 
mountain as himself, or the opposite. Egocentrism at its finest! 


 

-- 

Christopher L. Merkord, Ph.D.

Postdoctoral Fellow, GSCE

South Dakota State University
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: Chris Merkord <chris AT MERKORD.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 20:53:52 -0600
Are there any other mountain ranges in the world that have their own
adjectives for describing species distributions as being on one side or the
other?

I'm aware of cis- and trans-Himalayan.  After hearing about the etymology
of the Andean terms, I'm guessing the Himalayan ones are similarly rooted
in a colonial past (?).

Also, after thinking about it, I now see the relation between the
biogeographic terms and the chemical ones.  In chemistry, cis-isomerism
means two functional groups are on the same side of a molecule, while
trans- means two groups are on opposite sides of a molecule.  So in the
biogeographical sense, I suppose someone might consider a species' range as
being on the "same" side of a mountain as himself, or the opposite.
Egocentrism at its finest!

-- 
Christopher L. Merkord, Ph.D.
Postdoctoral Fellow, GSCE
South Dakota State University
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: de Ruben Dario <rubend46 AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 20:23:34 -0500
NEOORNERS,



Thanks for the interesting discussion. As a fellow South American, i would
suggest respectfully that it's important to avoid using this terms, not
only because it's unnecesary jargon, but it conveys a message of
colonialism.



Consider this: As Haffer was an european, his Cis-Andean side was the
lowlands in Amazonas, but for Chapman as an north american, of course it
was the Pacific (more close to him and most of his research). Haffer's 1967
suggestion that his  usage "seems preferable to that of Chapman" looks to
me like trying to impose his eurocentric view of the world. Note than in
this paper his suggestion comes as a footer, with no explanation of his
rationale at all (I'm not aware there's some scientific explanation given,
but i doubt it)



Because science should convey a representation of the world as accurate as
possible, I think this terms have no place nowadays and don't see the need
for any replacements. Something like "East of the andes, birds in the
Amazonian region evolved complex..." will probably work just as fine,
although that is a discussion for the more knowledgeable folks around here.



All the best,

Rubén Darío Palacio

Managing Director Fundación Ecotonos

www.ecotonos.org

2015-01-22 12:24 GMT-05:00 Reid Martin :

> Hello Diego and all,
> A most interesting discussion, and I thank those who have provided some
> context.  I'd be keen to see some discussion on potential replacement
> terms.  Someone suggested "East of Andes/West of Andes" - but at best these
> would make clumsy adjectives (and would need to be hyphenated, I think).
> Using "East Andean/West Andean" doesn't work, as many of the birds to which
> these terms are applied are not Andean taxa.
> Perhaps there is an obvious choice that escapes me at the moment.
> Regards,
> Martin
>
> ---
> Martin Reid
> San Antonio
> www.martinreid.com
>
>
>
>
>
> On Jan 22, 2015, at Jan 22, 7:42 AM, Diego Calderón Franco wrote:
>
>  Thanks everyone for such enlightening replies... it seems obvious that
> the usage is, grammatically-wise, arbitrary and not correct, but also
> Andres pointed out the reason behind it and seems to me that is pretty well
> fixed at least for "lowland" avifaunas in N South America...
> saludos
>
>
> El 22/01/15 a las 7:37, Stefan Kreft escribió:
>
> Hi Diego, and all,
>
> actually, Bill nailed it down when it comes to etymology. The origin of
> the terminology has its cause in the perspective of Europeans,
> predominating during the earlier periods of science, on the world.
> Cis-Andean = on this/"OUR" side of the Andes, trans-Andean = other side of
> the Andes. Look at how Portugal and Spain in the early 16th century
> (ruthlessly) "divided" Latin America between them. The Brazilian frontier
> roughly follows a circle with its centre in the Old World. Re
> cis-/trans-Andean, I cannot cite any reference I am afraid - but see below.
>
> Another forum has discussed this as well, and has tentatively come to the
> same conclusion: http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=274763.
>
> Andres is probably right in that Haffer (European!) made the terminology
> known more widely. However, Haffer didn't invent it - there are plenty of
> species with epithets "cisandinus", "cisandina", "cisandinum" that are
> older than Haffer's first works. E.g., *Synallaxis cisandina* (*Cranioleuca
> curtata cisandina) (*Taczanowski, 1882) (Or should it be the other way
> round? Well, you know what I mean.) Older usages, I think, always use
> cis-Andean = east of the Andes, trans-Andean = west of the Andes. At some
> point, it begins to mix up. I suppose Chilean scientists, for example,
> didn't want to be looked at as being "on the other side". Or terms just
> began to be confused. At any rate, wherever you are, the things around you
> are "on your side"!
>
> A different question is whether it seems recommendable to keep using those
> prefixes ... the historical reason for its origin fortunately is outdated
> ... but we shouldn't forget Latin terminology was once used as lingua
> franca (ha!) in science. Whether we want common English to replace it, is
> worth a discussion of its own.
>
> Fun thread ...
>
> Best wishes
> Stefan Kreft
>
>
> Am 22.01.2015 um 02:47 schrieb Eliot Miller:
>
> For what it's worth, my personal opinion about these terms has always been
> that it's unnecessary jargon. It doesn't really make sense given their
> definitions in organic chemistry, and it's liable to confuse readers (it
> continues to confuse me). It seems like it could just as well mean
> "distributed on only one side of the Andes" vs. "both sides." East of
> Andes/West of Andes seem a lot clearer to me. If you're wondering from a
> historical perspective, the answer by Andres is great, and clears things up
> for me too--thanks! But if you're wondering about it because you're
> thinking about using it, I vote don't do it.
>
> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 2:43 PM, Diego Calderón Franco <
> tocsdiegocalderon AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>  Andres,
>> as expected, you nailed it down!
>> gracias hermano,
>> d.
>>
>>
>> El 21/01/15 a las 17:22, Andres Cuervo escribió:
>>
>>  For Haffer, *cis-Andean* was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it was
>> more often the "Pacific/Chocó/Central American" side. Presumably, the
>> greater and more recent work of Haffer for lowland bird biogeography kind
>> of fixed the current usage of* cis-Andean* for referring to the
>> territory east of the range.
>>
>>  The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the
>> *generalization* that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the Andes
>> originated from Amazonia (Haffer's view point, perhaps)...
>>
>>  See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly this
>> one (and a quote):
>>
>>  Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of the
>> Andes. American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1:
>> <> America are designated in this paper as "trans-Andean" or "Pacific," and
>> those east of the Andes as "cis-Andean" or "Amazonian." Geographically
>> and historically (with respect to the evolution of the lowland bird
>> faunas) this usage seems preferable to that of Chapman (1917, 1926) who
>> sometimes referred to "cis-Andean" and "trans-Andean" in the opposite
>> sense>>
>>
>> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Calderón Franco <
>> tocsdiegocalderon AT gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>>  NEOORNERS,
>>> it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East
>>> of the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for
>>> those distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for example).
>>> Etymologically, CIS means "*on this side of*", while TRANS means "*across,
>>> on the far side, beyond*". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at
>>> least ornithology as far as I know) we use those relative terms in such
>>> way... were they developed by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas
>>> establishing the EAST (of the Andes) as the reference point?
>>> I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>>> thanks for your input,
>>> Diego.
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> Diego Calderon-Franco
>>> COLOMBIA Birding
>>> 
http://www.colombiabirding.comhttp://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiegohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 

>>>
>>>
>>
>> --
>> Diego Calderon-Franco
>> COLOMBIA Birding
>> 
http://www.colombiabirding.comhttp://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiegohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 

>>
>>
>
> --
>
> Stefan Kreft
> Free download:
> A Biodiversity Conservation Vision for the
> Biocorridor Amboró-Madidi (in 
Spanish)http://amboro-madidi.redesma.org/library/book_vision.pdf 

>
>
> --
> Diego Calderon-Franco
> COLOMBIA Birding
> 
http://www.colombiabirding.comhttp://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiegohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 

>
>
>


-- 
"Vive de acuerdo a la Naturaleza."  Lema estoico.
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: Reid Martin <upupa AT AIRMAIL.NET>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 11:24:03 -0600
Hello Diego and all,
A most interesting discussion, and I thank those who have provided some 
context. I'd be keen to see some discussion on potential replacement terms. 
Someone suggested "East of Andes/West of Andes" - but at best these would make 
clumsy adjectives (and would need to be hyphenated, I think). Using "East 
Andean/West Andean" doesn't work, as many of the birds to which these terms are 
applied are not Andean taxa. 

Perhaps there is an obvious choice that escapes me at the moment.
Regards,
Martin

---
Martin Reid
San Antonio
www.martinreid.com





On Jan 22, 2015, at Jan 22, 7:42 AM, Diego Caldern Franco wrote:

> Thanks everyone for such enlightening replies... it seems obvious that the 
usage is, grammatically-wise, arbitrary and not correct, but also Andres 
pointed out the reason behind it and seems to me that is pretty well fixed at 
least for "lowland" avifaunas in N South America... 

> saludos 
> 
> 
> El 22/01/15 a las 7:37, Stefan Kreft escribi:
>> Hi Diego, and all,
>> 
>> actually, Bill nailed it down when it comes to etymology. The origin of the 
terminology has its cause in the perspective of Europeans, predominating during 
the earlier periods of science, on the world. Cis-Andean = on this/"OUR" side 
of the Andes, trans-Andean = other side of the Andes. Look at how Portugal and 
Spain in the early 16th century (ruthlessly) "divided" Latin America between 
them. The Brazilian frontier roughly follows a circle with its centre in the 
Old World. Re cis-/trans-Andean, I cannot cite any reference I am afraid - but 
see below. 

>> 
>> Another forum has discussed this as well, and has tentatively come to the 
same conclusion: http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=274763. 

>> 
>> Andres is probably right in that Haffer (European!) made the terminology 
known more widely. However, Haffer didn't invent it - there are plenty of 
species with epithets "cisandinus", "cisandina", "cisandinum" that are older 
than Haffer's first works. E.g., Synallaxis cisandina (Cranioleuca curtata 
cisandina) (Taczanowski, 1882) (Or should it be the other way round? Well, you 
know what I mean.) Older usages, I think, always use cis-Andean = east of the 
Andes, trans-Andean = west of the Andes. At some point, it begins to mix up. I 
suppose Chilean scientists, for example, didn't want to be looked at as being 
"on the other side". Or terms just began to be confused. At any rate, wherever 
you are, the things around you are "on your side"! 

>> 
>> A different question is whether it seems recommendable to keep using those 
prefixes ... the historical reason for its origin fortunately is outdated ... 
but we shouldn't forget Latin terminology was once used as lingua franca (ha!) 
in science. Whether we want common English to replace it, is worth a discussion 
of its own. 

>> 
>> Fun thread ...
>> 
>> Best wishes
>> Stefan Kreft
>> 
>> 
>> Am 22.01.2015 um 02:47 schrieb Eliot Miller:
>>> For what it's worth, my personal opinion about these terms has always been 
that it's unnecessary jargon. It doesn't really make sense given their 
definitions in organic chemistry, and it's liable to confuse readers (it 
continues to confuse me). It seems like it could just as well mean "distributed 
on only one side of the Andes" vs. "both sides." East of Andes/West of Andes 
seem a lot clearer to me. If you're wondering from a historical perspective, 
the answer by Andres is great, and clears things up for me too--thanks! But if 
you're wondering about it because you're thinking about using it, I vote don't 
do it. 

>>> 
>>> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 2:43 PM, Diego Caldern Franco 
 wrote: 

>>> Andres,
>>> as expected, you nailed it down!
>>> gracias hermano,
>>> d.
>>> 
>>> 
>>> El 21/01/15 a las 17:22, Andres Cuervo escribi:
>>>> For Haffer, cis-Andean was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it was more 
often the "Pacific/Choc/Central American" side. Presumably, the greater and 
more recent work of Haffer for lowland bird biogeography kind of fixed the 
current usage of cis-Andean for referring to the territory east of the range. 

>>>> 
>>>> The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the *generalization* 
that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the Andes originated from Amazonia 
(Haffer's view point, perhaps)... 

>>>> 
>>>> See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly this one 
(and a quote): 

>>>> 
>>>> Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of the Andes. 
American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1: 

>>>> <> 

>>>> 
>>>> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Caldern Franco 
 wrote: 

>>>> NEOORNERS,
>>>> it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East of 
the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for those 
distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for example). 
Etymologically, CIS means "on this side of", while TRANS means "across, on the 
far side, beyond". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least ornithology as 
far as I know) we use those relative terms in such way... were they developed 
by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing the EAST (of the Andes) 
as the reference point? 

>>>> I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>>>> thanks for your input,
>>>> Diego. 
>>>> 
>>>> 
>>>> -- 
>>>> Diego Calderon-Franco
>>>> COLOMBIA Birding 
>>>> 
>>>> http://www.colombiabirding.com
>>>> http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
>>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
>>>> 
>>> 
>>> -- 
>>> Diego Calderon-Franco
>>> COLOMBIA Birding 
>>> 
>>> http://www.colombiabirding.com
>>> http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
>>> http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
>>> 
>> 
>> -- 
>>  
>> Stefan Kreft
>> Free download:
>> A Biodiversity Conservation Vision for the
>> Biocorridor Ambor-Madidi (in Spanish)
>> http://amboro-madidi.redesma.org/library/book_vision.pdf
> 
> -- 
> Diego Calderon-Franco
> COLOMBIA Birding 
> 
> http://www.colombiabirding.com
> http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
> http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
Subject: NEOLIT: Avances en Ciencias e Ingenierías 6 (2)
From: Manuel Plenge <plenge.manuel AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 12:15:41 -0500
Neoorners,



One paper in Avances en Ciencias e Ingenierías 6 (2).  Thanks to Juan
Freile for letting us know about this publication.  The PDF should be
requested from him at: jfreileo AT yahoo.com.



Manuel A. Plenge

Lima, Peru



Nilsson, Jonas, Juan F. Freile, Roger Ahlman, Dušan M. Brinkuizen, Paul J.
Greenfield, Alejandro Solano-Ugalde  2014.  Rare birds in Ecuador: second
annual report of the Committee of Ecuadorian Records in Ornithology (CERO).
 Avances en Ciencias e Ingenierías 6 (2): B38-B50.
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: Diego Caldern Franco <tocsdiegocalderon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 08:42:42 -0500
Thanks everyone for such enlightening replies... it seems obvious that 
the usage is, grammatically-wise, arbitrary and not correct, but also 
Andres pointed out the reason behind it and seems to me that is pretty 
well fixed at least for "lowland" avifaunas in N South America...
saludos


El 22/01/15 a las 7:37, Stefan Kreft escribi:
> Hi Diego, and all,
>
> actually, Bill nailed it down when it comes to etymology. The origin 
> of the terminology has its cause in the perspective of Europeans, 
> predominating during the earlier periods of science, on the world. 
> Cis-Andean = on this/"OUR" side of the Andes, trans-Andean = other 
> side of the Andes. Look at how Portugal and Spain in the early 16th 
> century (ruthlessly) "divided" Latin America between them. The 
> Brazilian frontier roughly follows a circle with its centre in the Old 
> World. Re cis-/trans-Andean, I cannot cite any reference I am afraid - 
> but see below.
>
> Another forum has discussed this as well, and has tentatively come to 
> the same conclusion: http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=274763.
>
> Andres is probably right in that Haffer (European!) made the 
> terminology known more widely. However, Haffer didn't invent it - 
> there are plenty of species with epithets "cisandinus", "cisandina", 
> "cisandinum" that are older than Haffer's first works. E.g., 
> /Synallaxis cisandina/ (/Cranioleuca curtata cisandina) (/Taczanowski, 
> 1882) (Or should it be the other way round? Well, you know what I 
> mean.) Older usages, I think, always use cis-Andean = east of the 
> Andes, trans-Andean = west of the Andes. At some point, it begins to 
> mix up. I suppose Chilean scientists, for example, didn't want to be 
> looked at as being "on the other side". Or terms just began to be 
> confused. At any rate, wherever you are, the things around you are "on 
> your side"!
>
> A different question is whether it seems recommendable to keep using 
> those prefixes ... the historical reason for its origin fortunately is 
> outdated ... but we shouldn't forget Latin terminology was once used 
> as lingua franca (ha!) in science. Whether we want common English to 
> replace it, is worth a discussion of its own.
>
> Fun thread ...
>
> Best wishes
> Stefan Kreft
>
>
> Am 22.01.2015 um 02:47 schrieb Eliot Miller:
>> For what it's worth, my personal opinion about these terms has always 
>> been that it's unnecessary jargon. It doesn't really make sense given 
>> their definitions in organic chemistry, and it's liable to confuse 
>> readers (it continues to confuse me). It seems like it could just as 
>> well mean "distributed on only one side of the Andes" vs. "both 
>> sides." East of Andes/West of Andes seem a lot clearer to me. If 
>> you're wondering from a historical perspective, the answer by Andres 
>> is great, and clears things up for me too--thanks! But if you're 
>> wondering about it because you're thinking about using it, I vote 
>> don't do it.
>>
>> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 2:43 PM, Diego Caldern Franco 
>> > wrote:
>>
>>     Andres,
>>     as expected, you nailed it down!
>>     gracias hermano,
>>     d.
>>
>>
>>     El 21/01/15 a las 17:22, Andres Cuervo escribi:
>>>     For Haffer, /cis-Andean/ was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it
>>>     was more often the "Pacific/Choc/Central American" side.
>>>     Presumably, the greater and more recent work of Haffer for
>>>     lowland bird biogeography kind of fixed the current usage
>>>     of/cis-Andean/ for referring to the territory east of the range.
>>>
>>>     The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the
>>>     *generalization* that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the
>>>     Andes originated from Amazonia (Haffer's view point, perhaps)...
>>>
>>>     See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly
>>>     this one (and a quote):
>>>
>>>     Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of
>>>     the Andes. American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1:
>>>     <>>     Central America are designated in this paper as "trans-Andean"
>>>     or "Pacific," and those east of the Andes as "cis-Andean" or
>>>     "Amazonian." Geographically and historically (with respect to
>>>     the evolution of the lowland bird faunas) this usage seems
>>>     preferable to that of Chapman (1917, 1926) who sometimes
>>>     referred to "cis-Andean" and "trans-Andean" in the opposite sense>>
>>>
>>>     On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Caldern Franco
>>>     >>     > wrote:
>>>
>>>         NEOORNERS,
>>>         it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa
>>>         distributed East of the Andes (Amazonian birds for example)
>>>         and the term Trans-Andean for those distributed West of the
>>>         Andes (Central American birds for example). Etymologically,
>>>         CIS means "/on this side of/", while TRANS means "/across,
>>>         on the far side, beyond/". So I am wondering WHY in biology
>>>         (or at least ornithology as far as I know) we use those
>>>         relative terms in such way... were they developed by
>>>         scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing the EAST
>>>         (of the Andes) as the reference point?
>>>         I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>>>         thanks for your input,
>>>         Diego.
>>>
>>>
>>>         -- 
>>>         Diego Calderon-Franco
>>>         COLOMBIA Birding
>>>
>>>         http://www.colombiabirding.com
>>>         http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
>>>         http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
>>>
>>>
>>
>>     -- 
>>     Diego Calderon-Franco
>>     COLOMBIA Birding
>>
>>     http://www.colombiabirding.com
>>     http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
>>     http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
>>
>>
>
> -- 
>   
> Stefan Kreft
> Free download:
> A Biodiversity Conservation Vision for the
> Biocorridor Ambor-Madidi (in Spanish)
> http://amboro-madidi.redesma.org/library/book_vision.pdf

-- 
Diego Calderon-Franco
COLOMBIA Birding

http://www.colombiabirding.com
http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
Subject: NEO-LIT: Journal of Biogeography
From: Huw Lloyd <H.Lloyd AT MMU.AC.UK>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 13:24:49 +0000
Here are the last of the 2014 papers for JBiogeog. Nothing of interest yet for 
2015 


Bryson, R. W., Chaves, J., Smith, B. T., Miller, M. J., Winker, K., Prez-Emn, 
J. L., Klicka, J. (2014), Diversification across the New World within the 
'blue' cardinalids (Aves: Cardinalidae). Journal of Biogeography, 41 (3): 
587-599. 


E-mail: brysonjr AT uw.edu

Aim
To examine the history of diversification of 'blue' cardinalids (Cardinalidae) 
across North and South America. 


Location
North America (including Middle America) and South America.

Methods
We collected 163 individuals of the 14 species of blue cardinalids and 
generated multilocus sequence data (3193 base pairs from one mitochondrial and 
three nuclear genes) to infer phylogeographical structure and reconstruct 
time-calibrated species trees. We then estimated the ancestral range at each 
divergence event and tested for temporal shifts in diversification rate. 


Results
Twenty-five lineages of blue cardinalids clustered into two major clades: one 
confined to North America, and a second concentrated in South America. Blue 
cardinalids probably originated in North America, but reconstructions were 
influenced by how migrant taxa were assigned to biogeographical regions. Most 
of the pre-Pleistocene divergences between extant taxa occurred in the North 
American clade, whereas most divergences in South America and adjacent Middle 
America occurred during the Pleistocene. Despite these differences, the rate of 
diversification for both clades has been similar and relatively constant over 
the past 10 million years, with little geographical exchange between North and 
South America outside the Panamanian isthmus region. 


Main conclusions
Our reconstruction of the diversification history of blue cardinalids indicates 
a role of both Neogene and Quaternary events in generating biotic diversity 
across North and South America. Although ancestral area reconstruction suggests 
a possible North American origin for blue cardinalids, the occurrence of 
seasonal migration in this group and their relatives limits inference. Our 
study highlights the importance of considering ecological and behavioural 
characteristics together with palaeogeological events in order to gain an 
understanding of the diversification history of widespread, mobile taxonomic 
groups. 



Pomara, L. Y., Ruokolainen, K., Young, K. R. (2014), Avian species composition 
across the Amazon River: the roles of dispersal limitation and environmental 
heterogeneity. Journal of Biogeography, 41 (4): 784-796 


E-mail: pomara AT wisc.edu

Aim
The roles of dispersal limitation and environmental heterogeneity in 
structuring tropical species composition can be better understood by accounting 
for dispersal barriers and possible niche differentiation effects. We make 
ecological and historical interpretations of dissimilarity in avian species 
composition across a riverine dispersal boundary in the light of environmental 
characteristics, species and subspecies range limits, and geographical 
distances. 


Location
Lowland rain forest, western Amazon River Basin, Peru.

Methods
We surveyed all birds and one plant family, collected soil samples and measured 
forest structural characteristics and fragmentation in surrounding landscapes, 
at sites to the north and south of the Amazon River flood plain. We used Mantel 
tests, multiple regression on distance matrices, indicator species analysis and 
ordination methods to assess the relationships among dissimilarities in species 
composition, geographical distance, position relative to the river and 
environmental characteristics. We examined compositional variation for all bird 
species, for only species without range limits between sites, and for species 
with and without subspecies limits at the Amazon River. 


Results
Dissimilarity in avian species composition across the river was large, despite 
a lack of environmental differences. Most of this dissimilarity was accounted 
for by species and subspecies range limits at the river. Plant species 
composition did not show any dissimilarity across the river. Plant species 
composition and forest fragmentation explained additional components of avian 
compositional dissimilarity not associated with the riverine boundary and 
involving different bird species. 


Main conclusions
The riverine dispersal boundary, floristic heterogeneity and forest 
fragmentation were associated with distinctive components of avian species 
compositional dissimilarity, collectively explaining three-quarters of the 
total dissimilarity among sites. Compositional dissimilarity was consistent 
with historical and continuing isolation of avian populations on opposite sides 
of the river, and may be partly driven by niche differentiation between 
subspecies. Geographical distance as a measure of dispersal limitation would 
not have accounted for these relationships. The use of rivers in 
biogeographical region delineation should address their variable importance for 
different taxa. 



Dr Huw Lloyd
Lecturer in Wildlife Ecology
Division of Biology and Conservation Ecology
School of Science and Environment
Manchester Metropolitan University
Chester Street, Manchester,
United Kingdom, M1 5GD
Telephone: +44161 247 1194
Email: h.lloyd AT mmu.ac.uk

Website: Conservation, Evolution and Behaviour Research Group
http://www.ceerec.mmu.ac.uk/ceb/

Office Hours: Wednesday 11am-12.30pm & Thursday 10am-11.30am

"Before acting on this email or opening any attachments you should read the 
Manchester Metropolitan University email disclaimer available on its website 
http://www.mmu.ac.uk/emaildisclaimer " 
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: Stefan Kreft <stefan_kreft AT GMX.DE>
Date: Thu, 22 Jan 2015 13:37:29 +0100
Hi Diego, and all,

actually, Bill nailed it down when it comes to etymology. The origin of 
the terminology has its cause in the perspective of Europeans, 
predominating during the earlier periods of science, on the world. 
Cis-Andean = on this/"OUR" side of the Andes, trans-Andean = other side 
of the Andes. Look at how Portugal and Spain in the early 16th century 
(ruthlessly) "divided" Latin America between them. The Brazilian 
frontier roughly follows a circle with its centre in the Old World. Re 
cis-/trans-Andean, I cannot cite any reference I am afraid - but see below.

Another forum has discussed this as well, and has tentatively come to 
the same conclusion: http://www.birdforum.net/showthread.php?t=274763.

Andres is probably right in that Haffer (European!) made the terminology 
known more widely. However, Haffer didn't invent it - there are plenty 
of species with epithets "cisandinus", "cisandina", "cisandinum" that 
are older than Haffer's first works. E.g., /Synallaxis cisandina/ 
(/Cranioleuca curtata cisandina) (/Taczanowski, 1882) (Or should it be 
the other way round? Well, you know what I mean.) Older usages, I think, 
always use cis-Andean = east of the Andes, trans-Andean = west of the 
Andes. At some point, it begins to mix up. I suppose Chilean scientists, 
for example, didn't want to be looked at as being "on the other side". 
Or terms just began to be confused. At any rate, wherever you are, the 
things around you are "on your side"!

A different question is whether it seems recommendable to keep using 
those prefixes ... the historical reason for its origin fortunately is 
outdated ... but we shouldn't forget Latin terminology was once used as 
lingua franca (ha!) in science. Whether we want common English to 
replace it, is worth a discussion of its own.

Fun thread ...

Best wishes
Stefan Kreft


Am 22.01.2015 um 02:47 schrieb Eliot Miller:
> For what it's worth, my personal opinion about these terms has always 
> been that it's unnecessary jargon. It doesn't really make sense given 
> their definitions in organic chemistry, and it's liable to confuse 
> readers (it continues to confuse me). It seems like it could just as 
> well mean "distributed on only one side of the Andes" vs. "both 
> sides." East of Andes/West of Andes seem a lot clearer to me. If 
> you're wondering from a historical perspective, the answer by Andres 
> is great, and clears things up for me too--thanks! But if you're 
> wondering about it because you're thinking about using it, I vote 
> don't do it.
>
> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 2:43 PM, Diego Caldern Franco 
> > wrote:
>
>     Andres,
>     as expected, you nailed it down!
>     gracias hermano,
>     d.
>
>
>     El 21/01/15 a las 17:22, Andres Cuervo escribi:
>>     For Haffer, /cis-Andean/ was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it
>>     was more often the "Pacific/Choc/Central American" side.
>>     Presumably, the greater and more recent work of Haffer for
>>     lowland bird biogeography kind of fixed the current usage
>>     of/cis-Andean/ for referring to the territory east of the range.
>>
>>     The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the
>>     *generalization* that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the
>>     Andes originated from Amazonia (Haffer's view point, perhaps)...
>>
>>     See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly
>>     this one (and a quote):
>>
>>     Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of
>>     the Andes. American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1:
>>     <>     Central America are designated in this paper as "trans-Andean" or
>>     "Pacific," and those east of the Andes as "cis-Andean" or
>>     "Amazonian." Geographically and historically (with respect to the
>>     evolution of the lowland bird faunas) this usage seems preferable
>>     to that of Chapman (1917, 1926) who sometimes referred to
>>     "cis-Andean" and "trans-Andean" in the opposite sense>>
>>
>>     On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Caldern Franco
>>     >     > wrote:
>>
>>         NEOORNERS,
>>         it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa
>>         distributed East of the Andes (Amazonian birds for example)
>>         and the term Trans-Andean for those distributed West of the
>>         Andes (Central American birds for example). Etymologically,
>>         CIS means "/on this side of/", while TRANS means "/across, on
>>         the far side, beyond/". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or
>>         at least ornithology as far as I know) we use those relative
>>         terms in such way... were they developed by scientist working
>>         on Cis-Andean areas establishing the EAST (of the Andes) as
>>         the reference point?
>>         I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>>         thanks for your input,
>>         Diego.
>>
>>
>>         -- 
>>         Diego Calderon-Franco
>>         COLOMBIA Birding
>>
>>         http://www.colombiabirding.com
>>         http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
>>         http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
>>
>>
>
>     -- 
>     Diego Calderon-Franco
>     COLOMBIA Birding
>
>     http://www.colombiabirding.com
>     http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
>     http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
>
>

-- 
  
Stefan Kreft
Free download:
A Biodiversity Conservation Vision for the
Biocorridor Ambor-Madidi (in Spanish)
http://amboro-madidi.redesma.org/library/book_vision.pdf
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: Eliot Miller <eliot.isaac AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:47:44 -0800
For what it's worth, my personal opinion about these terms has always been
that it's unnecessary jargon. It doesn't really make sense given their
definitions in organic chemistry, and it's liable to confuse readers (it
continues to confuse me). It seems like it could just as well mean
"distributed on only one side of the Andes" vs. "both sides." East of
Andes/West of Andes seem a lot clearer to me. If you're wondering from a
historical perspective, the answer by Andres is great, and clears things up
for me too--thanks! But if you're wondering about it because you're
thinking about using it, I vote don't do it.

On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 2:43 PM, Diego Caldern Franco <
tocsdiegocalderon AT gmail.com> wrote:

>  Andres,
> as expected, you nailed it down!
> gracias hermano,
> d.
>
>
> El 21/01/15 a las 17:22, Andres Cuervo escribi:
>
>  For Haffer, *cis-Andean* was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it was
> more often the "Pacific/Choc/Central American" side. Presumably, the
> greater and more recent work of Haffer for lowland bird biogeography kind
> of fixed the current usage of* cis-Andean* for referring to the territory
> east of the range.
>
>  The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the
> *generalization* that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the Andes
> originated from Amazonia (Haffer's view point, perhaps)...
>
>  See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly this one
> (and a quote):
>
>  Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of the
> Andes. American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1:
> < America are designated in this paper as "trans-Andean" or "Pacific," and
> those east of the Andes as "cis-Andean" or "Amazonian." Geographically
> and historically (with respect to the evolution of the lowland bird
> faunas) this usage seems preferable to that of Chapman (1917, 1926) who
> sometimes referred to "cis-Andean" and "trans-Andean" in the opposite
> sense>>
>
> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Caldern Franco <
> tocsdiegocalderon AT gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>  NEOORNERS,
>> it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East of
>> the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for those
>> distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for example).
>> Etymologically, CIS means "*on this side of*", while TRANS means "*across,
>> on the far side, beyond*". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least
>> ornithology as far as I know) we use those relative terms in such way...
>> were they developed by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing
>> the EAST (of the Andes) as the reference point?
>> I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>> thanks for your input,
>> Diego.
>>
>>
>> --
>> Diego Calderon-Franco
>> COLOMBIA Birding
>> 
http://www.colombiabirding.comhttp://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiegohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 

>>
>>
>
> --
> Diego Calderon-Franco
> COLOMBIA Birding
> 
http://www.colombiabirding.comhttp://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiegohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 

>
>
Subject: Neolit, Mexican Journals
From: Adolfo Gerardo Navarro Siguenza <adolfon AT CIENCIAS.UNAM.MX>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:54:37 -0600
Hola,

Please find 2014 relevant papers from Acta Zoológica Mexicana (n.s.) and
Revista Mexicana de Biodiversidad. Full texts available at web pages
indicated below.

Saludos

Adolfo

*REVISTA MEXICANA DE BIODIVERSIDAD*



Full texts at:  http://www.journals.unam.mx/index.php/bio/issue/archive



Vol 85, No 2 (2014)




ESTRUCTURA GENÉTICA POBLACIONAL DE LA FRAGATA COMÚN EN MÉXICO: UN ANÁLISIS
INTEGRATIVO DE LA INFLUENCIA DEL COMPORTAMIENTO REPRODUCTIVO Y DE LA
DISPERSIÓN SESGADA ENTRE SEXOS

Axayácatl Rocha-Olivares, Mónica González-Jaramillo

RESUMEN La fragata común (Fregata magnificens) es un ave marina monógama,
ampliamente distribuida, neotropical y pelágica, con bajos costos de vuelo,
alta capacidad de dispersión, dispersión sesgada por sexo y selección de
pareja por parte de la hembra. Aquí, adoptamos una aproximación integrativa
para evaluar la influencia del comportamiento la filopatria sesgada hacia
los machos, la selección de pareja por parte de las hembras y la distancia
geográfica como barreras no físicas para la dispersión, actuando en la
estructura genética de las fragatas comunes de las 4 colonias reproductivas
más grandes de México. Integramos observaciones ecológicas de dispersión,
producto de estudios de marcaje, análisis de marcadores genéticos heredados
maternal y biparentalmente, y modelos poblacionales de estructura de
grupos. Los datos de ADN mitocondrial (matrilineales) y de ADN polimórfico
amplificado al azar (biparentales)proporcionaron evidencia de la
diferenciación genética entre cuencas oceánicas, y entre las colonias
reproductivas del Pacífico oriental, así como de la ausencia de un patrón
genético de aislamiento por distancia. Nuestros resultados ecológicos,
genéticos y de modelaje son concordantes con los efectos esperados de
filopatria sesgada por sexo y de selección por parte de las hembras como
barreras no físicas para el entrecruzamiento, y sugieren que la distancia
geográfica no juega un papel significativo en la distinción genética de las
colonias reproductivas. La diferencia genética encontrada entre el Pacífico
oriental y el Caribe, así como entre las colonias reproductivas del
Pacífico, es relevante para los planes de manejo y las medidas de
conservación de la fragata común en la región.



EL JILGUERO DORADO (SICALIS FLAVEOLA) MODIFICA LA ESTRUCTURA DE SUS
VOCALIZACIONES PARA ADAPTARSE A HÁBITATS URBANOS (Argentina)

Evelina León, Adolfo Beltzer, Martín Quiroga

RESUMEN Los ecosistemas urbanos y suburbanos son áreas transformadas por
las actividades antrópicas que sustentan una importante diversidad
biológica. La alteración del campo acústico afecta la comunicación entre
animales, poniendo en riesgo la estabilidad de sus dinámicas poblacionales.
Cuando la comunicación acústica se realiza a distancia, como en el caso de
las aves, la señal que llega al receptor puede diferir de la emitida debido
a la degradación y contaminación acústica; por lo cual las especies deben
modificar sus vocalizaciones para comunicarse efectivamente. Se estudiaron
las vocalizaciones del jilguero dorado (Sicalis flaveola) en 2 sitios con
diferentes grados de contaminación acústica. El área con mayor
contaminación acústica registró trinos más breves con frecuencias, máximas
y mínimas, más elevadas; así como un preludio con frecuencias máximas más
bajas. Los datos constituyen el primer aporte a la estructura de la
vocalización del jilguero dorado en las áreas de estudio y brinda
evidencias sobre las modificaciones que sufren por la contaminación
acústica. Ninguna de las hipótesis explicativas conocidas contempla por sí
sola las modificaciones encontradas; lo que nos permite decir que esta
especie ajusta sus vocalizaciones a la contaminación acústica de diversas
maneras simultáneamente según las posibilidades intrínsecas de la especie.



Vol 85, No 3 (2014)




PATRONES ESPACIALES DE DISTRIBUCIÓN Y DIVERSIDAD DE LA AVIFAUNA EN LA
PROVINCIA DEL BALSAS

Marisol Castro-Torreblanca, Epifanio Blancas-Calva, Geovanni M.
Rodríguez-Mirón, David N. Espinosa-Organista

RESUMEN La provincia del Balsas ha sido delimitada como una unidad natural,
con base en sus taxones endémicos y variables ambientales. Es reconocida
como un centro de diversificación, endemismo y transición biogeográfica.
Sin embargo, existen elementos que permiten distinguir 2 componentes
bióticos diferentes al interior de la misma. En este estudio, analizamos
los patrones de distribución de la riqueza y diversidad β, de la avifauna
residente y total de la provincia del Balsas. Utilizamos 2 coeficientes de
disimilitud (1-Jclásico y 1-Jmod.). Se presentan 3 zonas con alta riqueza
de especies: 1) noreste; 2) oeste y 3) en el centro de la provincia del
Balsas. El patrón de diversidad β sugiere la existencia de 2 componentes
avifaunísticos, correspondientes a la sección oriental y occidental de la
provincia del Balsas. Esto concuerda con estudios de las tendencias de
distribución de otros taxones al interior de esta unidad biogeográfica, por
lo que se propone la división de la misma en 2 distritos faunísticos:
oriental y occidental.



INCREMENTO EN LA DISTRIBUCIÓN Y PRIMER REGISTRO DE ANIDACIÓN DE LA PALOMA
DE COLLAR (STREPTOPELIA DECAOCTO) EN LA PENÍNSULA DE BAJA CALIFORNIA, MÉXICO

Romeo Tinajero, Ricardo Rodríguez-Estrella

RESUMEN Documentamos diversos registros recientes de la paloma de collar
Streptopelia decaocto, especie exótica, invasora en diversos ranchos,
pueblos y ciudades de la península de Baja California. Nuestro primer
registro de la especie en Baja California Sur (BCS) lo tuvimos en el otoño
de 2008, y a partir de entonces registramos un incremento de la presencia
de esta especie en 64% de las localidades (N= 100). Presentamos los
primeros 2 registros de anidación de la especie en BCS, con lo que
confirmamos el establecimiento de la especie en el estado, con su expansión
a otras localidades del sur de la península. Discutimos y proponemos
algunas variables que han ayudado a su colonización.



ESCALAS ESPACIALES Y DIVERSIDAD BETA DE LOS VERTEBRADOS TERRESTRES EN MÉXICO

Leticia M. Ochoa-Ochoa, Mariana Munguía, Andrés Lira-Noriega, Víctor
Sánchez-Cordero, Oscar Flores-Villela, Adolfo Navarro-Sigüenza, Pilar
Rodríguez

RESUMEN Los patrones de diversidad son dependientes de la escala y la
diversidad beta no es la excepción. Se ha propuesto que México es
megadiverso por su alta diversidad beta, aunque existe poca información
sobre si dicha diversidad es dependiente de la escala espacial, regiones
geográficas y/o diferentes grupos taxonómicos. Aquí abordamos estas
preguntas de manera cuantitativa, con base en la hipótesis de
auto-similitud en el escalamiento de la diversidad. Utilizando áreas de
distribución de 2 513 especies de vertebrados terrestres mexicanos,
comparamos los patrones de diversidad beta de los 4 grupos taxonómicos, a
lo largo de 7 escalas espaciales (de ~10 km2 a 160 000 km2)y en 5 regiones
con diferentes características históricas y ambientales (Noroeste, Noreste,
Centro, Sur y la Península de Yucatán).



CLASIFICACIÓN JERÁRQUICA DE GREMIOS TRÓFICOS PARA AVES Y MAMÍFEROS DE
NORTEAMÉRICA

Constantino González-Salazar, Enrique Martínez-Meyer, Guadalupe
López-Santiago

RESUMEN La identificación y el análisis de gremios ecológicos han sido
fundamentales para entender los procesosque determinan la estructura y
organización de las comunidades. Sin embargo, revisando los estudios que
hanclasificado las especies en gremios, encontramos que tales
clasificaciones están basadas en diferentes criterios;como consecuencia,
una especie puede tener varias designaciones gremiales, limitando su
precisión y aplicabilidad.En este trabajo proponemos un esquema de
clasificación en gremios tróficos como primer paso para establecer
unaterminología común. Para ello, se consideraron 1 502 especies de aves y
mamíferos distribuidos en América del Norte(México, EUA y Canadá).



OBSERVACIONES DE LEUCISMO EN CUATRO ESPECIES DE AVES ACUÁTICAS EN GUERRERO
NEGRO, BAJA CALIFORNIA SUR, MÉXICO

Víctor Ayala-Pérez, Nallely Arce, Roberto Carmona

RESUMEN Se documenta la presencia de aberraciones de pigmentos de melaninas
en la coloración de las plumas en 4 especies acuáticas en Baja California
Sur: Podiceps nigricollis, Egretta rufescens, Puffinus opisthomelas y Larus
occidentalis. Estas observaciones representan los primeros registros de
leucismo en México para estas especies. La documentación de este tipo de
casos puede ayudar a entender la frecuencia de las aberraciones y su
variación entre los diferentes grupos de aves.



EL GÉNERO BASILINNA (AVES: TROCHILIDAE): UNA EVALUACIÓN BASADA EN EVIDENCIA
MOLECULAR E IMPLICACIONES PARA EL GÉNERO HYLOCHARIS

Blanca Estela Hernández-Baños, Luz Estela Zamudio-Beltrán, Luis Enrique
Eguiarte-Fruns, John Klicka, Jaime García-Moreno

RESUMEN Los colibríes son una de las familias de aves más diversa y las
relaciones filogenéticas dentro del grupo están empezando a entenderse
mejor gracias a estudios con datos moleculares. La mayoría de esos estudios
se ha enfocado a las relaciones filogenéticas de alto nivel dentro de la
familia y ahora también es necesario estudiar las relaciones entre y dentro
de los géneros con un enfoque semejante. En este estudio investigamos la
situación taxonómica del género Hylocharis, miembro del complejo de las
Esmeraldas, cuyas relaciones con otros géneros no están del todoclaras;
también investigamos la existencia del género Basilinna. Obtuvimos
secuencias mitocondriales (ND2: 537bp) y nucleares (intrón AK-5: 535 bp y
c-mos: 572 bp) para 6 de las 8 especies actualmente reconocidas, así como
para los grupos externos. Nuestros análisis, usando 3 métodos de inferencia
distintos (máxima parsimonia, máxima verosimilitud e inferencia bayesiana),
corroboran la existencia del género Basilinna conformado por 2 especies que
actualmente se asignan al género Hylocharis: leucotis y xantusi. Nuestro
estudio también sugiere que el género Hylocharis es parafilético e incluye
especies asignadas al género Amazilia.





Vol 85, No 4 (2014)




EL ESTUDIO DE LA BIODIVERSIDAD EN LA ERA DE LA SECUENCIACIÓN MASIVA

Ana E. Escalante, Lev Jardón Barbolla, Santiago Ramírez-Barahona, Luis E.
Eguiarte

RESUMEN Recientemente se han desarrollado nuevas tecnologías de
secuenciación masiva, conocidas como secuenciación de siguiente generación
(NGS, por sus siglas en inglés). Estas tecnologías permiten secuenciación
rápida, masiva y a bajo costo de regiones genómicas o genomas completos,
haciendo posible estudios genómicos de organismos no modelo y estudios
metagenómicos. Estas tecnologías prometen expandir las aproximaciones
moleculares de estudios ecológicos y evolutivos hacia asuntos relacionados
con conservación y manejo de la diversidad biológica ante retos como cambio
climático. Entre las plataformas NGS disponibles hay diferencias
fundamentales que resultan en diferente precisión en la determinación de
las secuencias, así como diferencias en la longitud de las mismas. Algunas
diferencias clave entre plataformas son los procedimientos para la
preparación de bibliotecas (cuando son necesarias) y el proceso de
secuenciación per se (e.g., pirosecuenciación, síntesis).



LA IMPORTANCIA DE LOS HÁBITATS RIPARIOS PARA LAS COMUNIDADES DE AVES EN UN
PAISAJE NEOTROPICAL ALTAMENTE MODIFICADO POR EL SER HUMANO [Colombia]

Moisés Elías Domínguez-López, Rubén Ortega-Álvarez

RESUMEN La intensificación de la agricultura y el desarrollo urbano son los
principales factores de degradación de los ecosistemas naturales,
particularmente en los países ricos en especies. En este estudio
determinamos la variación de las comunidades de aves entre sistemas
antropogénicos (i. e., potreros, cultivos, áreas urbanas) y riparios en un
paisaje altamente modificado por el ser humano al noroeste de Colombia.
Para ello, evaluamos las diferencias en la diversidad, estructura y
composición de las comunidades de aves de los sistemas estudiados.
Asimismo, analizamos la similitud entre los sistemas de acuerdo a la
preferencia de hábitat de las especies registradas. Nuestros resultados
muestran que los sistemas riparios juegan un papel fundamental en el
paisaje antropogénico, ya que mantienen comunidades de aves diversas y
complejas, alojan especies asociadas al interior de bosques y podrían estar
favoreciendo la prevalencia de comunidades de aves heterogéneas en los
sistemas adyacentes. Los potreros también exhibieron comunidades de aves
heterogéneas, lo cual pudo deberse a la presencia de árboles altos, una
alta cobertura arbustiva y la proximidad de los sistemas riparios. Pocas
especies fueron sobre-dominantes en los campos de cultivo y las áreas
urbanas puesto que estos sistemas presentan una estructura de la vegetación
simple, lo cual propicia que las comunidades de aves sean homogéneas y
dominadas por especies asociadas a sitios perturbados. Dado que
mundialmente la creciente población humana depende de los ecosistemas
agrícolas y urbanos, es imperante desarrollar actividades de manejo y
conservación asociadas a este tipo de sistemas, de tal manera que sea
posible conservar la vida silvestre y mejorar la calidad de vida del ser
humano.



ACTA ZOOLOGICA MEXICANA

Full texts at: http://www1.inecol.edu.mx/azm/contenido-ok.htm



Acta Zoológica Mexicana (n. s.) Vol. 30, No. 1 (2014)



Lira-Torres, I., Briones-Salas, M., Gómez de Anda, F. R., Ojeda-Ramírez, D.
& Peláez A., A. 2014. Uso y Aprovechamiento de Fauna Silvestre en la Selva
Zoque, México. Acta Zoológica Mexicana (n.s.), 30(1): 74-90.

RESUMEN. La cacería de subsistencia y la pérdida de hábitat son dos de las
principales actividadeshumanas que tienen un efecto negativo sobre la fauna
silvestre en las fronteras de colonización. En la presente investigación se
estudió el uso consuntivo que se da a la fauna silvestre en varias
comunidades de la Selva Zoque, México. Durante el año 2012 y principios del
2013 se realizó una serie de visitas a la región para conocer y listar la
riqueza de especies y usos que los habitantes hacen de ella, describir los
métodos de caza más utilizados, las especies preferidas y su frecuencia y/o
aprovechamiento. En total se cazaron 202 animales por 13 cazadores
participantes, el grupo biológico más utilizado es el de los mamíferos, N =
13 especies; las aves el segundo grupo, N = 4 especies y los reptiles el
menos aprovechado, N = 1 especies. El aprovechamiento de esta última clase
está orientado al uso alimenticio, y en menor grado, al artesanal, a
diferencia de los otros dos grupos, que en su mayoría tienen uso
alimentario, control, ornamental y medicinal. El total de biomasa obtenida
durante el estudio fue de 1900 kg. La biomasa aprovechada varió
significativamente entre especies (p > 0.001). La mayor producción de carne
se obtuvo a partir de: Pecari tajacu, Cuniculus paca, Dasypus novemcinctus,
Tapirus bairdii, Mazama temama y Tayassu pecari. La batida fue la técnica
más usada, también se identificaron las técnicas de espía o acecho en
sitios de alimentación, parcelas de trabajo y lampareo en áreas
conservadas. Los tipos de armas más empleadas fueron las escopetas calibre
0.12, 0.16, 0.20 y rifle 0.22. La cacería de subsistencia es una actividad
complementaria a las actividades agrícolas y ganaderas que las poblaciones
campesinas realizan en la Selva Zoque; sin embargo, es necesario continuar
realizando monitoreos para planear la sustentabilidad de ese recurso





López-Saut, E. G., Rodríguez-Estrella, R. & Chávez-Ramírez, F. 2014. ¿Son
las grullas indicadoras de la riqueza de especies de aves acuáticas en
humedales en el Altiplano Mexicano? Acta Zoológica Mexicana (n. s.), 30(2):
268-287.

Resumen. Los humedales son de los ecosistemas más productivos en el mundo y
contienen una alta diversidad de especies. A pesar de esto, se encuentran
amenazados por las actividades humanas que los modifican afectando su
función hasta la desaparición de algunos de ellos, particularmente aquellos
que se encuentran en zonas desérticas. Por lo anterior, es necesario
generar herramientas que sean simples pero confiables para evaluar la
calidad del humedal y su importancia para los grupos biológicos, con el fin
de detectar tendencias y proponer medidas de conservación. Un ejemplo es
utilizar bioindicadores que funcionen como indicadores de la riqueza de
especies aves acuáticas. La Grulla gris (Grus canadensis) depende de los
humedales en sus sitios invernales como refugio. Esta especie es
considerada una especie bajo protección en México. El objetivo de este
trabajo es analizar si puede ser un indicador de la riqueza de especies
acuáticas para una evaluación rápida del humedal. Aunque no se encontró una
correlación entre la presencia de las grullas y la riqueza de especies de
aves acuáticas, sí se encontraron diferencias en la composición de especies
y una mayor riqueza en los humedales donde están presentes las grullas. Los
humedales no tuvieron similitud en la composición de especies, por lo que
las grullas sirven de indicadoras para diferentes ensambles de aves
acuáticas. Al hacer un análisis propuesto para identificar especies
bioindicadoras, las grullas tienen un valor de 27.5 de un máximo de 32. Por
lo anterior las grullas pueden ser una especie indicadora de la riqueza de
especies acuáticas. Deben hacerse estudios a largo plazo y evaluar la
relación de las abundancias de las grullas con las abundancias de las aves
acuáticas para reforzar los resultados aquí presentados.

-- 


Dr. Adolfo G. Navarro-Sigüenza
Museo de Zoología
Departamento de Biología Evolutiva
Facultad de Ciencias
Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México
Apartado Postal 70-399, México D. F. 04510, México
Tel. (52-55) 56 22 54 35
Fax. (52-55) 56 22 48 28
E-mail: adolfon AT ciencias.unam.mx
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: Diego Calderón Franco <tocsdiegocalderon AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:43:54 -0500
Andres,
as expected, you nailed it down!
gracias hermano,
d.


El 21/01/15 a las 17:22, Andres Cuervo escribió:
> For Haffer, /cis-Andean/ was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it was 
> more often the "Pacific/Chocó/Central American" side. Presumably, the 
> greater and more recent work of Haffer for lowland bird biogeography 
> kind of fixed the current usage of/cis-Andean/ for referring to the 
> territory east of the range.
>
> The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the 
> *generalization* that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the Andes 
> originated from Amazonia (Haffer's view point, perhaps)...
>
> See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly this 
> one (and a quote):
>
> Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of the 
> Andes. American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1:
> < America are designated in this paper as "trans-Andean" or "Pacific," 
> and those east of the Andes as "cis-Andean" or "Amazonian." 
> Geographically and historically (with respect to the evolution of the 
> lowland bird faunas) this usage seems preferable to that of Chapman 
> (1917, 1926) who sometimes referred to "cis-Andean" and "trans-Andean" 
> in the opposite sense>>
>
> On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Calderón Franco 
> > wrote:
>
>     NEOORNERS,
>     it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed
>     East of the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term
>     Trans-Andean for those distributed West of the Andes (Central
>     American birds for example). Etymologically, CIS means "/on this
>     side of/", while TRANS means "/across, on the far side, beyond/".
>     So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least ornithology as far
>     as I know) we use those relative terms in such way... were they
>     developed by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing
>     the EAST (of the Andes) as the reference point?
>     I have not been able to find any reference about it...
>     thanks for your input,
>     Diego.
>
>
>     -- 
>     Diego Calderon-Franco
>     COLOMBIA Birding
>
>     http://www.colombiabirding.com
>     http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
>     http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
>
>

-- 
Diego Calderon-Franco
COLOMBIA Birding

http://www.colombiabirding.com
http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: Andres Cuervo <amcuervo AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 16:22:45 -0600
For Haffer, *cis-Andean* was the Amazonian side. For Chapman, it was more
often the "Pacific/Chocó/Central American" side. Presumably, the greater
and more recent work of Haffer for lowland bird biogeography kind of fixed
the current usage of* cis-Andean* for referring to the territory east of
the range.

The usage is arbitrary, though, and likely stems from the *generalization*
that the lowland avifauna on both sides of the Andes originated from
Amazonia (Haffer's view point, perhaps)...

See the various paper by Haffer published in 1967, particularly this one
(and a quote):

Haffer, J. (1967). Speciation in Colombian forest birds west of the Andes.
American Museum Novitates; no. 2294. p. 1:
<>

On Wed, Jan 21, 2015 at 3:47 PM, Diego Calderón Franco <
tocsdiegocalderon AT gmail.com> wrote:

>  NEOORNERS,
> it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East of
> the Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for those
> distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for example).
> Etymologically, CIS means "*on this side of*", while TRANS means "*across,
> on the far side, beyond*". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least
> ornithology as far as I know) we use those relative terms in such way...
> were they developed by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing
> the EAST (of the Andes) as the reference point?
> I have not been able to find any reference about it...
> thanks for your input,
> Diego.
>
>
> --
> Diego Calderon-Franco
> COLOMBIA Birding
> 
http://www.colombiabirding.comhttp://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiegohttp://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets 

>
>
Subject: Re: cis & trans
From: Bill Porteous <phaenostictus AT GMAIL.COM>
Date: Wed, 21 Jan 2015 17:03:17 -0500
My guess, for what it’s worth, is simply that the terms were coined from the 
perspective of the European naturalists and collectors who were the first to be 
active in South America. Julius Caesar used the terms trans-alpine and 
cis-alpine to describe Europe outside the Roman Empire. 


 

Cheers

 

Bill Porteous

 

From: Bulletin Board for Ornithologists working with Neotropical Birds 
[mailto:NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU] On Behalf Of Jacob Berv 

Sent: 21 January 2015 17:00
To: NEOORN-L AT LISTSERV.LSU.EDU
Subject: Re: [NEOORN-L] cis & trans

 

My guess is that the use of these terms was probably co-opted from chemistry - 
where it refers to the molecular chirality (one of the few things I remember 
from organic chemistry!). I think they are convenient terms that are context 
dependent. I personally don’t have a problem with using them as long as the 
meaning is clear. 


 

Jake

 

On Jan 21, 2015, at 4:47 PM, Diego Calderón Franco 
 > wrote: 


 

NEOORNERS,
it is traditional to use the term Cis-Andean for taxa distributed East of the 
Andes (Amazonian birds for example) and the term Trans-Andean for those 
distributed West of the Andes (Central American birds for example). 
Etymologically, CIS means "on this side of", while TRANS means "across, on the 
far side, beyond". So I am wondering WHY in biology (or at least ornithology as 
far as I know) we use those relative terms in such way... were they developed 
by scientist working on Cis-Andean areas establishing the EAST (of the Andes) 
as the reference point? 

I have not been able to find any reference about it...
thanks for your input,
Diego. 





-- 
Diego Calderon-Franco
COLOMBIA Birding 
 
http://www.colombiabirding.com  
http://www.youtube.com/user/COLOMBIABirdingDiego
http://www.flickr.com/photos/colombia_birding_diego/sets